Disability

Edited by Jami L. Anderson (University of Michigan - Flint)
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  1. The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability.Margrit Shildrick - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory:1-4.
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  2. Conceptualising Person-Centered Advance Care Planning for People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Multifaceted Theoretical Approach.Jacqueline M. McGinley & Victoria Knoke - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (3):244-258.
  3. When Caring Is Just and Justice is Caring: Justice and Mental Retardation.Eva Feder Kittay - 2001 - Public Culture 13 (3):557-580.
    Among the various human forms alluded to in the Hebrew prayer, mental retardation appears to be one of the most difficult to celebrate. It is the disability that other disabled persons do not want attributed to them. It is the disability for which prospective parents are most likely to use selective abortion (Wertz 2000). And it is the disability that prompted one of the most illustrious United States Supreme Court Justices to endorse forced sterilization, because "three generations of imbeciles are (...)
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  4. Renewing Medicine’s Basic Concepts: On Ambiguity.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 13 (1):8.
    I argue that the concept of normality in medical research and practice is inextricable from that of ambiguity. I do so in the context of Edmund Pellegrino's call for a renewed reflection on medicine’s basic concepts and by drawing on work in critical disability studies concerning Deafness and body integrity identity disorder. If medical practitioners and philosophers of medicine wish to improve their understanding of the meaning of medicine as well as its concrete practice, they should take seriously the import (...)
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  5. Disability, Disease, and Health Sufficiency.Sean Aas - 2016 - In Carina Fourie & Annette Rid (eds.), What is Enough?: Sufficiency, Justice, and Health. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter argues that standard accounts of health are ill-suited to constructing a plausible theory of health justice, particularly a sufficientarian theory. The problem in these accounts is revealed by their treatment of disability. Theorists of health justice need to define “health” more narrowly to capture the legitimate claims of people with disabilities. Following Ronald Amundson and Peter Hucklenbroich, this chapter proposes such a definition. Health, as defined in this chapter, is the absence of conditions that directly cause, or threaten (...)
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  6. Discrimination and Disability.Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. New York: Routledge.
  7. Special Supplement: The Disability Rights Critique of Prenatal Genetic Testing Reflections and Recommendations.Erik Parens & Adrienne Asch - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (5):S1.
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  8. Using Codes of Ethics for Disabled Children Who Communicate Non-Verbally – Some Challenges and Implications for Social Workers.Malcolm Carey & Katherine Anne Prynallt-Jones - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (1):78-83.
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  9. From the Crooked Timber of Humanity, Beautiful Things Should Be Made!Anita Silvers - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 10 (2):1-5.
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  10. Paying for Sex—Only for People with Disabilities?Brian D. Earp & Ole Martin Moen - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):54-56.
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  11. Is Disability Mere Difference?Greg Bognar - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):46-49.
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  12. Enhancement, Disability and the Riddle of the Relevant Circumstances.Hazem Zohny - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9).
    The welfarist account of enhancement and disability holds enhanced and disabled states on a spectrum: the former are biological or psychological states that increase the chances of a person leading a good life in the relevant set of circumstances, while the latter decrease those chances. Here, I focus on a particular issue raised by this account: what should we count as part of an individual’s relevant set of circumstances when thinking about enhanced and disabled states? Specifically, is social prejudice relevant (...)
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  13. This Nigger's Broken: Hyper‐Masculinity, the Buck, and the Role of Physical Disability in White Anxiety Toward the Black Male Body.Tommy J. Curry - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):321-343.
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  14. Parents with Disabilities.Adam Cureton - 2017 - In Leslie Francis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 407-427.
    Having and raising children is widely regarded as one of the most valuable projects a person can choose to undertake. Yet many disabled people find it difficult to share in this value because of obstacles that arise from widespread social attitudes about disability. A common assumption is that having a disability tends to make someone unfit to parent. This assumption may seem especially relevant as a factor in decisions about whether to allow, encourage and assist disabled people to reproduce and (...)
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  15. You Didn't Build That: Equality and Productivity in a Complex Society.Sean Aas - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    This paper argues for Serious Distributive Egalitarianism – the view that some material inequalities are seriously objectionable as such; not merely, say, because such inequalities tend to generate inequalities in status. Social justice requires equality, I argue, because basic social institutions produce important goods and are produced in turn by the relevantly equal contributions of all those that comply with them. E.g., basic social institutions make it much easier to produce cooperatively than it would be in their absence; therefore, these (...)
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  16. The Matter of Disability.David T. Mitchell & Sharon L. Snyder - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):487-492.
    By ruling out questions of impairment from the social critique of disability, Disability Studies analyses establish a limit point in the field. Of course the setting of “limits” enables possibilities in multiple directions as well as fortifies boundaries of refusal. For instance, impairment becomes in DS simultaneously a productive refusal to interpret disabled bodies as inferior to non-disabled bodies and a bar to thinking through more active engagements with disability as materiality. Disability materiality such as conditions produced by ecological toxicities (...)
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  17. Disability and Depression.A. Cvetkovich & A. Wilkerson - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):497-503.
    Here, Ann Cvetkovich, interviewed by Abby Wilkerson, brings Cvetkovich’s influential cultural studies analysis of depression explicitly into conversation with disability studies. Cvetkovich understands “feeling bad” as a defining affective state under neoliberalism. Drawing on a distinctive historical/cultural archive, she challenges the atomism of the neoliberal medical model that frames depression and affective distress more generally as the result of faulty brain chemistry—individual organisms gone awry. Instead, she traces these common experiences to sociopolitical phenomena ranging from current neoliberal demands for productivity (...)
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  18. Artificial Companions: Empathy and Vulnerability Mirroring in Human-Robot Relations.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2010 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 4 (3).
    Under what conditions can robots become companions and what are the ethical issues that might arise in human-robot companionship relations? I argue that the possibility and future of robots as companions depends on the robot’s capacity to be a recipient of human empathy, and that one necessary condition for this to happen is that the robot mirrors human vulnerabilities. For the purpose of these arguments, I make a distinction between empathy-as-cognition and empathy-as-feeling, connecting the latter to the moral sentiment tradition (...)
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  19. Disability, Depression, Diagnosis, and Harm: Reflections on Two Personal Scenarios.G. Thomas Couser - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities.
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  20. Equality of Opportunity, Disability, and Stigma.Jeffrey M. Brown - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:175-181.
  21. Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability.Andria Bianchi - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:107-121.
    Respect for autonomy grounds common ethical judgments about why people should be allowed to make decisions for themselves. Under this assumption, it is concerning that a number of feminist conceptions of autonomy present challenges for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper explores some of the most philosophically influential feminist accounts of autonomy and demonstrates how these accounts exclude persons with intellectual disabilities. As a possible solution to these accounts, Laura Davy’s inclusive design approach is presented, which is a revised conception (...)
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  22. Bottlenecks, Disability, and Preference-Formation.Joseph Fishkin - 2016 - Social Philosophy Today 32:189-197.
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  23. Child Visual Discourse: The Use of Language, Gestures, and Vocalizations by Deaf Preschoolers1.Piotr Tomaszewski - 2008 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 39 (1):9-18.
    Child visual discourse: The use of language, gestures, and vocalizations by deaf preschoolers1 This exploratory study examined the linguistic activity and conversational skills of deaf preschoolers by observing child-child dyads in free-play situations. Deaf child of deaf parents - deaf child of deaf parents pairs were compared with deaf child of hearing parents - deaf child of hearing parents pairs. Children from the two groups were videotaped during dyadic peer interactions in a naturalistic play situation. The findings indicated that deaf (...)
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  24. Supercrips Versus the Pitiful Handicapped: Reception of Disabling Images by Disabled Audience Members.Amit Kama - 2004 - Communications 29 (4):447-466.
    Thirty Israeli disabled people were asked to describe their most memorable interactions with mass mediated images of disability as part of a tentative endeavor to delve into their reception patterns. Two stereotypes are discussed in this paper, namely the supercrip and the pitiful disabled. The interviewees seek examples to corroborate their belief that physical, social, and cultural obstacles can be overcome. Highly regarded supercrips embody one example as ‘regular’ people are especially coveted. Well-known, successful disabled people are put on a (...)
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  25. International Communication: A Dialogue of the Deaf?Majid Tehranian - 1983 - Communications 9 (2-3):261-280.
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  26. Disabled – Therefore, Unhealthy?Sean Aas - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (5):1259-1274.
    This paper argues that disabled people can be healthy. I argue, first, following the well-known ‘social model of disability’, that we should prefer a usage of ‘disabled’ which does not imply any kind of impairment that is essentially inconsistent with health. This is because one can be disabled only because limited by false social perception of impairment and one can be, if impaired, disabled not because of the impairment but rather only because of the social response to it. Second, I (...)
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  27. The Meaning of Living Close to a Person with Alzheimer Disease.Mette Bergman, Caroline Graff, Maria Eriksdotter, Kerstin S. Fugl-Meyer & Marja Schuster - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (3):341-349.
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  28. How to Develop a Phenomenological Model of Disability.Kristian Moltke Martiny - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (4):553-565.
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  29. A Feminist Contestation of Ableist Assumptions: Implications for Biomedical Ethics, Disability Theory, and Phenomenology.Christine Marie Wieseler - unknown
    This dissertation contributes to the development of philosophy of disability by drawing on disability studies, feminist philosophy, phenomenology, and philosophy of biology in order to contest epistemic and ontological assumptions about disability within biomedical ethics as well as within philosophical work on the body, demonstrating how philosophical inquiry is radically transformed when experiences of disability are taken seriously. In the first two chapters, I focus on epistemological and ontological concerns surrounding disability within biomedical ethics. Although disabled people and their advocates (...)
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  30. Autonomy, Sexuality, and Intellectual Disability in Advance.Andria Bianchi - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  31. Deaf Prove Deft in 'My Third Eye' [Review of the National Theater of the Deaf's Play "My Third Eye" at the Pabst Theater, Milwaukee WI].Curtis Carter - unknown
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  32. The Creation of Autism.Bonnie Evans - unknown
    Bonnie Evans on how autism became such an important psychological concept.
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  33. Three Aristotelian Accounts of Disease and Disability.Shane N. Glackin - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (3):311-326.
    The question of whether medical and psychiatric judgements involve a normative or evaluative component has been a source of wide and vehement disagreement. But among those who think such a component is involved, there is considerable further disagreement as to its nature. In this article, I consider several versions of Aristotelian normativism, as propounded by Christopher Megone, Michael Thompson and Philippa Foot, and Martha Nussbaum. The first two, I claim, can be persuasively rebutted by different modes of liberal pluralist challenge (...)
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  34. Bottlenecks, Disability, and Preference-Formation in Advance.Joseph Fishkin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
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  35. Freedom and Disability Rights: Dependence, Independence, and Interdependence.Inga Bostad & Halvor Hanisch - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (3):371-384.
    The increasing focus on disability rights—as found, for instance, in the U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities —challenges philosophical imaginaries. This article broadens the philosophical imaginary of freedom by exploring the relation of dependence, independence, and interdependence in the lives of people with disabilities. It argues that traditional concepts of freedom are rather insensitive to difference within humanity, and that the lives of people with severe disabilities challenge philosophers to argue and conceptualize freedom not only as independence (...)
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  36. Disability as Abject: Kristeva, Disability, and Resistance.Josh Dohmen - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):762-778.
    In this essay, I develop an account of disability exclusion that, though inspired by Julia Kristeva, diverges from her account in several important ways. I first offer a brief interpretation of Kristeva's essays “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity and … Vulnerability” and “A Tragedy and a Dream: Disability Revisited” and, using this interpretation, I assess certain criticisms of Kristeva's position made by Jan Grue in his “Rhetorics of Difference: Julia Kristeva and Disability.” I then argue that Kristeva's concept of abjection, especially as (...)
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  37. Embodied Storytellers:Disability Studies and Medical Humanities.Martha Stoddard Holmes - 2015 - Hastings Center Report 45 (2):11-15.
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  38. Adrienne Asch:Memories of a Close Friend and Collaborator.David Wasserman - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (2):15-17.
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  39. One World: The Disabled in Society.Bridget Nuttgens - 1999 - New Blackfriars 80 (940):291-298.
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  40. A Review of “The Disability Studies Reader 4thed.”. [REVIEW]Donna Sayman - 2015 - Educational Studies: Journal of the American Educational Studies Association 51 (1):89-92.
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  41. A Development of a System Enables Character Input and PC Operation Via Voice for a Physically Disabled Person with a Speech Impediment.Toshimasa Tanioka, Hiroyuki Egashira, Mayumi Takata, Yasuhisa Okazaki, Kenzi Watanabe & Hiroki Kondo - 2008 - Transactions of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence 23:447-456.
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  42. A Measurement of the Language Ability of Deaf Children.Rudolf Pintner & Donald G. Paterson - 1916 - Psychological Review 23 (6):413-436.
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  43. Disability in the Ottoman Arab World, 1500–1800By Sara Scalenghe.Miri Shefer-Mossensohn - forthcoming - Journal of Islamic Studies:etv112.
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  44. Thinking Critically About Disability in Biomedical Ethics Courses.Christine Wieseler - 2015 - American Association of Philosophy Teachers Studies in Pedagogy 1:82-97.
    Several studies have shown that nondisabled people—especially healthcare professionals—tend to judge the quality of life of disabled people to be much lower than disabled people themselves report. In part, this is due to dominant narratives about disability. Teachers of biomedical ethics courses have the opportunity to help students to think critically about disability. This may involve interrogating our own assumptions, given the pervasiveness of ableism. This article is intended to facilitate reflection on narratives about disability. After discussing two readings that (...)
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  45. Development of a Prototype Tool for Measuring the Context of Care in Intellectual Disability Settings in the UK.Kay Mafuba, Stephen Roberts, Nasser Matoorianpour, Maria Cozens & Bob Gates - unknown
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  46. Transition to Adulthood for Young People with Intellectual Disability: The Experiences of Their Families.H. Leonard, K. -R. Foley, T. Pikora, J. Bourke, K. Wong, L. McPherson, N. Lennox & J. Downs - unknown
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  47. Offensive Beneficence.Adam Cureton - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (1):74--90.
    Simple acts of kindness that are performed sincerely and with evident good will can also, paradoxically, be perceived as deeply insulting by the people we succeed in benefiting. When we are moved to help someone out of genuine concern for her, when we have no intention to humiliate or embarrass her and when we succeed at benefiting her, how can our generosity be disparaging or demeaning to her? Yet, when the tables are turned, we sometimes find ourselves brusquely refusing assistance (...)
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  48. Just What Is the Disability Perspective on Disability?Tom Shakespeare - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):31-32.
    In the helpful article “Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology,” Joseph Stramondo adds to the critique of actually existing bioethics and explains why disability activists and scholars so often find fault with the arguments of bioethicists. He is careful not to stereotype either community—rightly, given that bioethicists endorse positions as disparate as utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, and feminist ethics, among others. Although Stramondo never explicitly mentions utilitarians or liberals, it seems probable that these are the main targets of his (...)
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  49. Warum Die Idee der Chancengleichheit Im Bildungswesen Sowie Die Konezeption von Behinderung Als Nachteil Fehlgeleitet Sind.Thomas Schramme - 2012 - In Ivo Wallilmann-Helmer (ed.), Chancengleichheit und Behinderung in der Bildung. Alber Verlag. pp. 123-138.
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  50. Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):22-30.
    The deeply entrenched, sometimes heated conflict between the disability movement and the profession of bioethics is well known and well documented. Critiques of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion are probably the most salient and most sophisticated of disability studies scholars’ engagements with bioethics, but there are many other topics over which disability activists and scholars have encountered the field of bioethics in an adversarial way, including health care rationing, growth-attenuation interventions, assisted reproduction technology, and physician-assisted suicide. The tension between the (...)
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