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  1. The Hindi-Urdu NA and reasonable inference.Ahmad Jabbar - forthcoming - In Ahmad Jabbar & Pravaal Yadav (eds.), Proceedings of the 59th annual meeting of the Chicago Linguistic Society (CLS 59).
    This paper presents a study into the Hindi-Urdu 'na' as a sentence-final particle. Although also used as a topic marker and negation, 'na' occurs sentence-finally across clause-types. In light of the data, we think the following hypothesis offers the best fit: 'na' signals the speaker’s belief that the content of na’s containing clause is a reasonable inference, given what’s common ground. Notably, in addition to other clause-types, we explore na's distribution in exclamations and exclamatives. We link our work to recent (...)
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  2. Grounding with particles.Ahmad Jabbar & Veda Kanamarlapudi - forthcoming - In Ahmad Jabbar & Veda Kanamarlapudi (eds.), Proceedings of the 27th workshop on the Semantics and Pragmatics of Dialogue (SemDial 27).
    We focus on a sui generis grounding move in Hindi-Urdu dialogue, namely 'voh hi na'. 'Voh' is third person pronoun and can function as a propositional anaphor in dialogue. 'Hi' and 'na' are two discourse particles in Hindi-Urdu. A dataset consisting of minimal pairs of dialogues is presented to get a better sense of the move. Using dynamic models of discourse structure, we propose a semantics for 'voh hi na' in terms of its update effects.
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  3. Presuppositional fallacies.Fabrizio Macagno - forthcoming - Argumentation:1-32.
    Presuppositions are at the same time a crucial and almost neglected dimension of arguments and fallacies. Arguments involve different types of presuppositions, which can be used for manipulative purposes in distinct ways. However, what are presuppositions? What is their dialectical function? Why and how can they be dangerous? This paper intends to address these questions by developing the pragmatic approaches to presupposition from a dialectical perspective. The use of presuppositions will be analyzed in terms of presumptive conclusions concerning the interlocutor’s (...)
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  4. Reimagining Illocutionary Force.Lucy McDonald - forthcoming - The Philosophical Quarterly.
    Speech act theorists tend to hold that the illocutionary force of an utterance is determined by one interlocutor alone: either the speaker or the hearer. Yet experience tells us that the force of our utterances is not determined unilaterally. Rather, communication often feels collaborative. In this paper, I develop and defend a collaborative theory of illocutionary force, according to which the illocutionary force of an utterance is determined by an agreement reached by the speaker and the hearer. This theory, which (...)
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  5. A Problem for Generic Generalisations in Scientific Communication.Mark Bowker - 2023 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 40 (1):123-132.
    Generic generalisations like ‘Opioids are highly addictive’ are very useful in scientific communication, but they can often be interpreted in many different ways. Although this is not a problem when all interpretations provide the same answer to the question under discussion, a problem arises when a generic generalisation is used to answer a question other than that originally intended. In such cases, some interpretations of the generalisation might answer the question in a way that the original speaker would not endorse. (...)
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  6. Could the Environment Acquire its Own Discourse?Byron Kaldis - 2003 - History of the Human Sciences 16 (3):73-103.
    This article addresses the question as to whether it is logically possible to fashion a discourse exclusively for the natural environment. Could such a discourse emerge without colonization by other social spheres acting as proxy? The prospects appear to be rather bleak, for even in the case of two apparently non-human-directed or non-committal discourses, that of extensionist ethics and new sophisticated management (of environmental crises), the latent social-constructionism built into both renders them monistic discourses hegemonically mapping the territories of what (...)
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  7. Scientific Discourse in Sociohistorical Context: The Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 1675-1975 by Dwight Atkinson. [REVIEW]Alan Gross - 2001 - Isis 92:576-577.
  8. The making of memory: the politics of archives, libraries and museums in the construction of national consciousness.Richard Harvey Brown & Beth Davis-Brown - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (4):17-32.
    An archive is a repository - that is, a place or space in which materials of historic interest or social significance are stored and ordered. A national archive is the storing and ordering place of the collective memory of that nation or people(s). This article provides a brief his torical/theoretical introduction to the politics of the archive in late capi talist societies and discusses this politics of memory via the performance of ordinary daily activities of librarians and archivists. Some relevant (...)
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  9. The Discourses of Science by Marcello Pera; Clarissa Botsford. [REVIEW]Rose-Mary Sargent - 1996 - Isis 87:397-397.
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  10. Writing and 'scientific discourse' in sociology.Jacques Leenhardt - 1992 - History of the Human Sciences 5 (1):63-71.
    Is writing a human science? Certainly it is not science as such, despite much specialist knowledge about its strategies, developed by scholarly research going back many years. But what are called the human sciences are not ’sciences’ either; they have simply followed in the wake of the natural sciences and used the same word. And yet it is precisely here, in the equivocal area opened up by the statement ’writing as a human science’, that one of the fundamental questions concerning (...)
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  11. Problems of Discourse Theory.Robert Alexy - 1988 - Critica 20 (58):43-65.
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  12. The Emergence of Philological Discourse in the German States, 1770-1810.Robert Leventhal - 1986 - Isis 77:243-260.
  13. Talking History: Reflections on Discourse Analysis.Steven Shapin - 1984 - Isis 75:125-130.
  14. Some Questions about Language: A Theory about Human Discourse and Its Objects.Mortimer J. Adler - 1978 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 11 (2):143-145.
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  15. Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue: From the Art of Discourse to the Art of Reason by Walter J. Ong. [REVIEW]John Murdoch - 1961 - Isis 52:602-606.
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