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  1. States of mind: a neuroscientist searches for the seat of consciousness. [REVIEW]Ned Block - 2024 - Science 384 (6696):629.
  2. Against an Epistemic Argument for Mineness.Shao-Pu Kang - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-18.
    When you have a conscious experience—such as feeling pain, watching the sunset, or thinking about your loved ones—are you aware of the experience as your own, even when you do not reflect on, think about, or attend to it? Let us say that an experience has “mineness” just in case its subject is aware of it as her own while she undergoes it. And let us call the view that all ordinary experiences have mineness “typicalism.” Recently, Guillot has offered a (...)
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  3. The New Hysteria: Borderline Personality Disorder and Epistemic Injustice.Natalie Dorfman & Joel Michael Reynolds - 2023 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 16 (2):162-181.
    The diagnostic category of borderline personality disorder (BPD) has come under increasing criticism in recent years. In this paper, we analyze the role and impact of epistemic injustice, specifically testimonial injustice, in relation to the diagnosis of BPD. We first offer a critical sociological and historical account, detailing and expanding a range of arguments that BPD is problematic nosologically. We then turn to explore the epistemic injustices that can result from a BPD diagnosis, showing how they can lead to experiences (...)
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  4. A Philosophy for the Science of Animal Consciousness.Walter Veit - 2023 - New York: Routledge.
    This book attempts to advance Donald Griffin's vision of the "final, crowning chapter of the Darwinian revolution" by developing a philosophy for the science of animal consciousness. It advocates a Darwinian bottom-up approach that treats consciousness as a complex, evolved, and multidimensional phenomenon in nature rather than a mysterious all-or-nothing property immune to the tools of science and restricted to a single species. -/- The so-called emergence of a science of consciousness in the 1990s has at best been a science (...)
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  5. Patients with Disorders of Consciousness: Are They Nonconscious, Unconscious, or Subconscious? Expanding the Discussion.Andrew And Alexander Fingelkurts - 2023 - Brain Sciences 13 (5):814.
    Unprecedented advancements in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC) have given rise to ethical questions about how to recognize and respect autonomy and a sense of agency of the personhood when those capacities are themselves disordered, as they typically are in patients with DoC. At the intersection of these questions rests the distinction between consciousness and unconsciousness. Indeed, evaluations of consciousness levels and capacity for recovery have a significant impact on decisions regarding whether to discontinue (...)
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  6. Aphantasia and Conscious Thought.Preston Lennon - 2023 - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Mind Vol. 3. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The sensory constraint on conscious thought says that if a thought is phenomenally conscious, its phenomenal properties must be reducible to some sensory phenomenal character. I argue that the burgeoning psychological literature on aphantasia, an impoverishment in the ability to generate mental imagery, provides a counterexample to the sensory constraint. The best explanation of aphantasics’ introspective reports, neuroimaging, and task performance is that some aphantasics have conscious thoughts without sensory mental imagery. This argument against the sensory constraint supports the existence (...)
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  7. Consciousness: critical concepts in psychology.Max Velmans (ed.) - 2018 - London and New York: Routledge.
    Volume 1. The Origins of psychology and the study of consciousness -- Volume 2. Cognitive and neuropsychological approaches to the study of consciousness Part 1 -- Volume 3. Cognitive and neuropsychological approaches to the study of consciousness Part 2 -- Volume 4. New directions: psychogenesis, transformations of consciousness and non-reductive, integrative theories.
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  8. Jahi McMath, a New Disorder of Consciousness.Calixto Machado - 2021 - Revista Latinoamericana de Bioética 21 (1).
    In this paper, I review the case of Jahi McMath, who was diagnosed with brain death. Nonetheless, ancillary tests performed nine months after the initial brain insult showed conservation of intracranial structures, EEG activity, and autonomic reactivity to the “Mother Talks” stimulus. She was clinically in an unarousable and unresponsive state, without evidence of self-awareness or awareness of the environment. However, the total absence of brainstem reflexes and partial responsiveness rejected the possibility of a coma. Jahi did not have uws (...)
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  9. What’s the Appropriate Target of Allocative Justification?Zara Anwarzai & Ricky Mouser - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (2-3):167-168.
    Building on work by Peterman, Aas, and Wasserman (2021), we modify their prospective benefit analysis to include only medically-relevant information about patients as persons without reference to their broader lives. Because patients (not their lives) must be treated equally, we argue that patients are the appropriate targets of allocative justification. We go on to challenge some of our current data-collection practices on this basis.
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  10. Is the biological adaptiveness of delusions doomed?Eugenia Lancellotta - 2022 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 13 (1):47-63.
    Delusions are usually considered as harmful and dysfunctional beliefs, one of the primary symptoms of a psychiatric illness and the mark of madness in popular culture. However, in recent times a much more positive role has been advocated for delusions. More specifically, it has been argued that delusions might be an answer to a problem rather than problems in themselves. By delivering psychological and epistemic benefits, delusions would allow people who face severe biological or psychological difficulties to survive in their (...)
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  11. Expressing experience: the promise and perils of the phenomenological interview.Elizabeth Pienkos, Borut Škodlar & Louis Sass - 2021 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (1):53-71.
    This paper outlines several of the challenges that are inherent in any attempt to communicate subjective experience to others, particularly in the context of a clinical interview. It presents the phenomenological interview as a way of effectively responding to these challenges, which may be especially important when attempting to understand the profound experiential transformations that take place in schizophrenia. Features of language experience in schizophrenia—including changes in interpersonal orientation, a sense of the arbitrariness of language, and a desire for faithful (...)
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  12. Disabilities and wellbeing: The bad and the neutral.Joshua Shepherd - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford University Press, Usa.
    This chapter argues for a normative distinction between disabilities that are inherently negative with respect to wellbeing and disabilities that are inherently neutral with respect to wellbeing. First, after clarifying terms I discuss recent arguments according to which possession of a disability is inherently neutral with respect to wellbeing. I note that though these arguments are compelling, they are only intended to cover certain disabilities, and in fact there exists a broad class regarding which they do not apply. In section (...)
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  13. Reintroducing Consciousness in Psychopathology: Review of the Literature and Conceptual Framework. [REVIEW]Gert Ouwersloot, Jan Derksen & Gerrit Glas - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Alterations in consciousness are among the most common transdiagnostic psychopathological symptoms. Therefore clinical practice would benefit from a clear conceptual framework that guides the recognition, comprehension, and treatment of consciousness disorders. However, contemporary psychopathology lacks such a framework. We describe how pathology of consciousness is currently being addressed in clinical psychology and psychiatry so far, and how the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Edition (ICD-10) refer to this subject. A (...)
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  14. The minimal self hypothesis.Timothy Lane - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 85:103029.
    For millennia self has been conjectured to be necessary for consciousness. But scant empirical evidence has been adduced to support this hypothesis. Inconsistent explications of “self” and failure to design apt experiments have impeded progress. Advocates of phenomenological psychiatry, however, have helped explicate “self,” and employed it to explain some psychopathological symptoms. In those studies, “self” is understood in a minimalist sense, sheer “for-me-ness.” Unfortunately, explication of the “minimal self” (MS) has relied on conceptual analysis, and applications to psychopathology have (...)
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  15. Blackout of my nights: Contentless, timeless and selfless report from the night in patients with central hypersomnias.Emma Chabani, Marie Charlotte Vionnet, Romy Beauté, Smaranda Leu-Semenescu, Pauline Dodet & Isabelle Arnulf - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 81:102931.
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  16. Delusions and theories of belief.Michael H. Connors & Peter W. Halligan - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 81:102935.
  17. Cotard syndrome, self-awareness, and I-concepts.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2020 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 1 (1):1-20.
    Various psychopathologies of self-awareness, such as somatoparaphrenia and thought insertion in schizophrenia, might seem to threaten the viability of the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness since it requires a HOT about one’s own mental state to accompany every conscious state. The HOT theory of consciousness says that what makes a mental state a conscious mental state is that there is a HOT to the effect that “I am in mental state M.” I have argued in previous work that a (...)
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  18. Somebody is home.Timothy Joseph Lane - 2020 - Cognitive Neuropsychology 37 (3-4):193-196.
    Invited Commentary On: Graziano, M. S. A., Guterstam, A., Bio, B. J., Wilterson, A. I. (2019). Toward a standard model of consciousness: Reconciling the attention schema, global workspace, higher order thought, and illusionist theories. Cognitive Neuropsychology.
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  19. Disturbed Consciousness: New Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness.Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.) - 2015 - MIT Press.
    In Disturbed Consciousness, philosophers and other scholars examine various psychopathologies in light of specific philosophical theories of consciousness. The contributing authors—some of them discussing or defending their own theoretical work—consider not only how a theory of consciousness can account for a specific psychopathological condition but also how the characteristics of a psychopathology might challenge such a theory. Thus one essay defends the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness against the charge that it cannot account for somatoparaphrenia (a delusion in which (...)
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  20. The interoception and imagination loop in hypnotic phenomena.Alain Parra & Arnaud Rey - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 73:102765.
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  21. Development of synaesthetic consistency: Repeated autonomous engagement with graphemes and colours leads to consistent associations.Rebecca Ovalle Fresa & Nicolas Rothen - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 73:102764.
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  22. Depersonalization Disorder, Affective Processing and Predictive Coding.Philip Gerrans - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):401-418.
    A flood of new multidisciplinary work on the causes of depersonalization disorder provides a new way to think about the feeling that experiences “belong” to the self. In this paper I argue that this feeling, baptized “mineness” or “subjective presence” : 565–573, 2013) emerges from a multilevel interaction between emotional, affective and cognitive processing. The “self” to which experience is attributed is a predictive model made by the mind to explain the modulation of affect as the organism progresses through the (...)
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  23. What is it Like to Be Disconnected from the Body?: A Phenomenological Account of Disembodiment in Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder.S. Tanaka - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (5-6):239-262.
    So long as I maintain the ordinary modes of experience such as walking or eating, the body appears to me as something inseparable from myself. Through and with the body I act in the world, and through and from the body I perceive the world. However, this is not the case in the pathological condition known as depersonalization/ derealization disorder. People with DD frequently claim that their self is disconnected from the body and their bodily actions feel like those of (...)
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  24. Auditory Verbal Hallucinations: Social, but how?B. Alderson-Day & C. Fernyhough - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (7-8):163-194.
    Auditory verbal hallucinations are experiences of hearing voices in the absence of an external speaker. Standard explanatory models propose that AVH arise from misattributed verbal cognitions, but provide little account of how heard voices often have a distinct persona and agency. Here we review the argument that AVH have important social and agent-like properties and consider how different neurocognitive approaches to AVH can account for these elements, focusing on inner speech, memory, and predictive processing. We then evaluate the possible role (...)
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  25. Automaticity of pitch class-color synesthesia as revealed by a Stroop-like effect.Kosuke Itoh, Honami Sakata, Hironaka Igarashi & Tsutomu Nakada - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 71 (C):86-91.
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  26. Emotions associated with different textures during touch.Marina Iosifyan & Olga Korolkova - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 71:79-85.
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  27. Self-reported inner speech relates to phonological retrieval ability in people with aphasia.Mackenzie E. Fama, Mary P. Henderson, Sarah F. Snider, William Hayward, Rhonda B. Friedman & Peter E. Turkeltaub - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 71:18-29.
  28. Increased phantom recollection after sleep.Julia Macera & Agnès Daurat - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 66:101-114.
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  29. How do the body schema and the body image interact?Victor Pitron, Adrian Alsmith & Frédérique de Vignemont - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 65 (C):352-358.
  30. What phantom limbs are.Michael L. Anderson - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 64:216-226.
  31. Inducing dissociation and schizotypal experiences through “vision-deforming” glasses.S. B. Renard, R. J. C. Huntjens & G. H. M. Pijnenborg - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 65:209-215.
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  32. Possibilities of Misidentification.Lauren Ashwell - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):161-164.
    We seem to have a special, seemingly direct, relationship to our own thoughts that we do not have to the thoughts of others; I can become aware of my thoughts in a way that I cannot become aware of yours: through introspection. Those who have delusions of thought-insertion, however, claim not only to be aware of another's thoughts, but to have another's thoughts in their own mind. These thoughts, of course, cannot actually be someone else's thoughts. However, if we take (...)
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  33. The depersonalized brain: New evidence supporting a distinction between depersonalization and derealization from discrete patterns of autonomic suppression observed in a non-clinical sample.Hayley Dewe, Derrick G. Watson, Klaus Kessler & Jason J. Braithwaite - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 63:29-46.
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  34. How are the spatial characteristics of the body represented? A reply to Pitron & de Vignemont.Stephen Gadsby - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 62:163-168.
    In their article, Pitron and de Vignemont (2017) provide an insightful and well overdue discussion of the relationship between long-term body representation models and Alice in Wonderland syndrome. Here, I supplement their discussion with a number of observations. First, I present a cautionary note regarding the interpretation of experiential changes in body size as reflective of changes in the content of body representations. Second, I show how their evidence contradicts an alternative model of body representation arising from research into anorexia (...)
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  35. Synesthetic hallucinations induced by psychedelic drugs in a congenitally blind man.Sara Dell'Erba, David J. Brown & Michael J. Proulx - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 60:127-132.
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  36. Reality, Realness, and the Natural Attitude.Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):115-118.
  37. Intimations of Immortality.Peter Fifield & Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):141-144.
    Young’s paper (2012) offers an interesting and fruitful extension to recent work on Cotard’s syndrome, and in particular, a philosophical investigation of how and why beliefs around death and non-existence frequently co-occur with beliefs around immortality. In this brief response, we discuss a few issues from the paper. Namely, the issue of Cotard delusion being a natural kind, the seeming paradox of death and immortality and its relation to wider culture and literature, and the utility of the concept of misplaced (...)
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  38. Effects of perceptual load and socially meaningful stimuli on crossmodal selective attention in Autism Spectrum Disorder and neurotypical samples.Ian Tyndall, Liam Ragless & Denis O'Hora - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 60:25-36.
  39. Authenticity, Insight and Impaired Decision-Making Capacity in Acquired Brain Injury.Gareth S. Owen, Fabian Freyenhagen & Wayne Martin - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (1):29-32.
    Thanks to Barton Palmer and John McMillan for these thoughtful commentaries. We found much to agree with and it is striking how so many of the issues relating to decision-making capacity assessment find resonances outside of an English jurisdiction. California and New Zealand are clearly grappling with a very similar set of issues and the commentaries speak to the international nature of these discussions.We will pick up on some main points the commentaries raise.As Palmer notes, DMC law is vulnerable to (...)
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  40. Locked to a wrong body: Eating disorders as the outcome of a primary disturbance in multisensory body integration.Giuseppe Riva & Santino Gaudio - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 59:57-59.
  41. Disturbances of consciousness in dementia with Lewy bodies associated with alteration in nicotinic receptor binding in the temporal cortex.Clive G. Ballard, Jennifer A. Court, Margaret Piggott, Mary Johnson, John O’Brien, Ian McKeith, Clive Holmes, Peter Lantos, Evelyn Jaros, Robert Perry & E. Perry - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):461-474.
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  42. Trauma and Belief.Julia Tanney - 2017 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 24 (4):351-353.
    We undergo a traumatic experience, such as a life-threatening accident or a brutal attack. We survive a period of relentless stress, perhaps because we are in a war zone and witness or commit atrocities. Raised by parents who are alcoholic or mentally ill, we endure traumatic experiences on a daily basis. Or, we are ignored, neglected, or treated as playthings by narcissistic parents, who themselves were ignored and neglected, and on and on through generations. To survive these experiences, perhaps we (...)
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  43. Enhanced accessibility of ignored neutral and negative items in nonclinical dissociative individuals.Chui-De Chiu - 2018 - Consciousness and Cognition 57 (C):74-83.
  44. Different patterns of recollection impairment in confabulation reveal different disorders of consciousness: A multiple case study.Valentina La Corte, Mara Serra, Nathalie George, Pascale Pradat-Diehl & Gianfranco Dalla Barba - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:396-406.
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  45. Maladaptive daydreaming: Evidence for an under-researched mental health disorder.Jayne Bigelsen, Jonathan M. Lehrfeld, Daniela S. Jopp & Eli Somer - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 42:254-266.
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  46. Giving meaning to illness: An investigation of self-defining memories in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.Virginie Voltzenlogel, Alexandra Ernst, Jérôme de Sèze, David Brassat, Liliann Manning & Fabrice Berna - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 45:200-209.
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  47. Introduction – Cognitive penetration and predictive coding. Pushing the debate forward with the recent achievements of cognitive science.Albert Newen, Francesco Marchi & Peter Brössel - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 47:1-5.
  48. Positive future-oriented fantasies and depressive symptoms: Indirect relationship through brooding.Natalia Macrynikola, Shama Goklani, Julia Slotnick & Regina Miranda - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 51:1-9.
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  49. Distorted body representations in anorexia nervosa.Stephen Gadsby - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 51:17-33.
    In this paper, I discuss empirical evidence regarding anorexic patients’ distorted body representations. I fit this evidence into a broader framework for understanding how the spatial content of the body is tracked and represented. This framework is motivated by O’Shaughnessy’s (1980) long-term body image hypothesis. This hypothesis posits a representation that tracks changes in the spatial content of the body and supplies this content to other body representations. I argue that a similar kind of body representation might exist and, in (...)
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  50. Transcranial parenchymal sonography in patients with Chronic Disorders of Consciousness: Association with neuroimaging data, and beyond.Antonino Chillura, Antonino Naro, Alberto Cacciola, Alessia Bramanti, Placido Bramanti & Rocco Salvatore Calabrò - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 52:32-38.
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