This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
116 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 116
  1. Robert Merrihew Adams (1991). An Anti-Molinist Argument. Philosophical Perspectives 5:343-353.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. Leslie Armour (1988). Newman, Arnold & the Problem of Particular Providence. Religious Studies 24 (2):173 - 187.
    It has often been suggested – recently again by Michael Goulder in a debate with John Hick – that what traditionally was called the problem of ‘particular providence’, the problem of God's selective interference in the ongoing affairs of the world, is so acute as to render any form of rational theism impossible. In the same debate Hick argues for a ‘minimalist’ position which allows divine intervention only in the form of a general, radiated, goodness and benevolence on which human (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Anthony D. Baker (2016). Divine Courtesy: Providence and Human Language in Shakespeare's History Plays. Heythrop Journal 57 (5):753-769.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. David J. Bartholomew (2008). God, Chance, and Purpose: Can God Have It Both Ways? Cambridge University Press.
    The thesis of this book is that chance is neither unreal nor non-existent but an integral part of God's creation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5. D. Basinger (2000). Divine Providence: The Molinist Account. Philosophical Review 109 (2):274-276.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. David Basinger (1991). Middle Knowledge and Divine Control: Some Clarifications. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (3):129 - 139.
    What then have we discovered? The general issue under discussion, remember, is whether it is advantageous or disadvantageous for the theist to affirm MK, especially as this form of knowledge relates to God's control over earthly affairs. As we have seen, both proponents and opponents of MK have claimed that this form of knowledge gives God significant power over earthly affairs, including control over the (indeterministically) free choices of humans.We have seen, though, that such a contention is dubious. There are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. David Basinger (1979). Human Freedom and Divine Providence: Some New Thoughts on an Old Problem. Religious Studies 15 (4):491 - 510.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Lawrence C. Becker (1972). Foreknowledge and Predestination. Mind 81 (321):138-141.
  9. Christopher J. Berry (1977). On the Meaning of Progress and Providence in the Fourth Century. Heythrop Journal 18 (3):257–270.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Marc E. Bobro (2008). Leibniz on Concurrence and Efficient Causation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):317-338.
    Leibniz defends concurrentism, the view that both God and created substances are causally responsible for changes in the states of created substances. Interpretive problems, however, arise in determining just what causal role each plays. Some recent work has been revisionist, greatly downplaying the causal role played by created substances—arguing instead that according to Leibniz only God has productive causal power. Though bearing some causal responsibility for changes in their perceptual states, created substances are not efficient causes of such changes. This (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. T. Ryan Byerly (2015). Do God's Beliefs About the Future Depend on the Future? Journal of Analytic Theology 3:124-9.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. T. Ryan Byerly (2014). The Mechanics of Divine Foreknowledge and Providence: A Time-Ordering Account. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Carlos A. Casanova (2016). Is There Divine Providence According To Aristotle? Nova et Vetera 14 (1):199-226.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Caleb Cohoe (2014). God, Causality, and Petitionary Prayer. Faith and Philosophy 31 (1):24-45.
    Many maintain that petitionary prayer is pointless. I argue that the theist can defend petitionary prayer by giving a general account of how divine and creaturely causation can be compatible and complementary, based on the claim that the goodness of something depends on its cause. I use Thomas Aquinas’s metaphysical framework to give an account that explains why a world with creaturely causation better reflects God’s goodness than a world in which God brought all things about immediately. In such a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Jason Colwell (2000). Chaos and Providence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 48 (3):131-138.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. Benjamin S. Cordry (2009). Divine Hiddenness and Belief de Re. Religious Studies 45 (1):1-19.
    In this paper I argue that Poston and Dougherty's attempt to undermine the problem of divine hiddenness by using the notion of belief de re is problematic at best. They hold that individuals who appear to be unbelievers (because they are de dicto unbelievers) may actually be de re believers. I construct a set of conditions on ascribing belief de re to show that it is prima facie implausible to claim that seemingly inculpable and apparent unbelievers are really de re (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. Steven B. Cowan (2003). The Grounding Objection to Middle Knowledge Revisited. Religious Studies 39 (1):93-102.
    The Molinist doctrine that God has middle knowledge requires that God knows the truth-values of counterfactuals of freedom, propositions about what free agents would do in hypothetical circumstances. A well-known objection to middle knowledge, the grounding objection, contends that counterfactuals of freedom have no truth-value because there is no fact to the matter as to what an agent with libertarian freedom would do in counterfactual circumstances. Molinists, however, have offered responses to the grounding objection that they believe are adequate for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. Brian Davies (1999). Divine Providence. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 73 (4):646-650.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Myrto Dragona-Monachou (1994). Divine Providence in the Philosophy of the Empire. In Wolfgang Haase (ed.), Philosophie, Wissenschaften, Technik. Philosophie. De Gruyter. pp. 4417-4490.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. S. F. (2000). Peter Frick Divine Providence in Philo of Alexandria. (Texts and Studies in Ancient Judaism, 77). (Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 1999). Pp. XIII+220. DM 85 Hbk. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (1):123-125.
  21. Thomas Flint (1988). Two Accounts of Providence. In Thomas V. Morris (ed.), Divine and Human Action: Essays on the Metaphysics of Theism. Cornell University Press. pp. 147-181.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Thomas P. Flint (2008). Divine Providence. In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Ithaca: Oxford University Press.
    This article attempts to spell out more clearly the Thomist, the Openist, and the Molinist approaches to divine providence, and to indicate the strengths and weaknesses of these three positions. It begins by discussing both the traditional notion of divine providence and the libertarian picture of freedom. The article then argues that each theory of divine providence has its advantages and disadvantages. Each has had numerous able and creative defenders. As with most philosophical disputes, one can hardly expect this debate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23. Thomas P. Flint (1999). A New Anti-Anti-Molinist Argument. Religious Studies 35 (3):299-305.
    This paper argues that William Hasker's 'A new anti-Molinist argument' offers a fascinating but ultimately unsuccessful new instalment in his continuing campaign to discredit the picture of providence based on the theory of middle knowledge. It is first shown that Hasker's argument, though suffering from a seemingly irreparable logical gap, does nicely highlight a significant (and hitherto unduly underemphasized) point of contention between Molinists and anti-Molinists -- the question whether or not Molinists are committed to viewing counterfactuals of creaturely freedom (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Alfred J. Freddoso (1991). God's General Concurrence with Secondary Causes: Why Conservation is Not Enough. Philosophical Perspectives 5:553-585.
    After an exposition of some key concepts in scholastic ontology, this paper examines four arguments presented by Francisco Suarez for the thesis, commonly held by Christian Aristotelians, that God's causal contribution to effects occurring in the ordinary course of nature goes beyond His merely conserving created substances along with their active and passive causal powers. The postulation of a further causal contribution, known as God's general concurrence (or general concourse), can be viewed as an attempt to accommodate an element of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  25. Richard M. Gale (2000). Swinburne on Providence. Religious Studies 36 (2):209-219.
    My review of Swinburne's elaborate and ingenious higher-good type theodicy will begin with an examination of his argument for why the theist needs a theodicy in the first place. After a preliminary sketch of his theodicy and its crucial free-will plank, its rational-choice theoretic arguments will be critically scrutinized.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Robert K. Garcia (forthcoming). Tropes as Divine Acts: The Nature of Creaturely Properties in a World Sustained by God. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion.
    I aim to synthesize two issues within theistic metaphysics. The first concerns the metaphysics of creaturely properties and, more specifically, the nature of unshareable properties, or tropes. The second concerns the metaphysics of providence and, more specifically, the way in which God sustains creatures, or sustenance. I propose that creaturely properties, understood as what I call modifier tropes, are identical with divine acts of sustenance, understood as acts of property-conferral. I argue that this *theistic conferralism* is attractive because it integrates (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Peter Geach (1977). Providence and Evil. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    It is the assertion that the world is ruled by Divine Providence that gives rise to the problem of evil; if the world is planned in all its detail by a mind ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  28. Karl W. Giberson (ed.) (2016). Abraham's Dice: Chance and Providence in the Monotheistic Traditions. Oxford University Press USA.
    Most of us believe everything happens for a reason. Whether it is "God's will","karma", or "fate," we want to believe that nothing in the world, especially disasters and tragedies, is a random, meaningless event. But now, as never before, confident scientific assertions that the world embodies a profound contingency are challenging theological claims that God acts providentially in the world. The random and meandering path of evolution is widely used as an argument that God did not create life.Abraham's Dice explores (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Victor Gourevitch (2000). Rousseau on Providence. Review of Metaphysics 53 (3):565 - 611.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Jean-Noël Grandhomme (2011). La Congrégation Des Sœurs de la Divine Providence de Ribeauvillé Pendant la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, 1939-1945. Revue des Sciences Religieuses 85 (4):523-556.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Shawn Graves (forthcoming). God and Moral Perfection. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion.
    One will be hard-pressed to find a morally perfect agent in this world. It’s not that there aren’t any morally good people. It just takes a lot to be morally perfect. However, theists claim that God is morally perfect. (Atheists claim that if God exists, God is morally perfect.) Perhaps they are mistaken. This chapter presents an argument for the conclusion that God is not morally perfect. The argument depends upon two things: (1) the nature of the concept of moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Rowan Grigg, The Lattice Milieu.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Johannes Grössl & Leigh Vicens (2014). Closing the Door on Limited-Risk Open Theism. Faith and Philosophy 31 (4):475-485.
    This paper argues against a version of open theism defended by Gregory Boyd, which we call “limited risk,” according to which God could guarantee at creation at least the fulfillment of His most central purpose for the world: that of having a “people for himself.” We show that such a view depends on the assumption that free human decisions can be “statistically determined” within certain percentage ranges, and that this assumption is inconsistent with open theists’ commitment to a libertarian conception (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Garrett Hardin (1980). Ecology and the Death of Providence. Zygon 15 (1):57-68.
  35. Charles A. Hart (1943). Divine Providence and the Problem of Evil. New Scholasticism 17 (1):68-69.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. William Hasker (2002). The Antinomies of Divine Providence. Philosophia-Christi 4 (2):361-375.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. William Hasker (1999). A New Anti-Molinist Argument. Religious Studies 35 (3):291-297.
    An argument is given showing that, on the assumptions of Molinism, human beings must bring about the truth of the counterfactuals of freedom that govern their actions. But, it is claimed, it is impossible for humans to do this, and so Molinism is involved in a contradiction. The Molinist must maintain, on the contrary, that we can indeed bring about the truth of counterfactuals of freedom about us. This question turns out to depend on whether the counterfactuals of freedom are, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. William Hasker (1999). Divine Providence. Faith and Philosophy 16 (2):248-253.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. William Hasker (1993). How Good/Bad is Middle Knowledge? A Reply to Basinger. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 33 (2):111 - 118.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Brian L. Hebblethwaite (1978). Providence and Divine Action. Religious Studies 14 (2):223 - 236.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Paul Helm (1999). Thomas P. Flint Divine Providence. (Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1998). Pp. XI+258. £35.00 Hbk. Religious Studies 35 (1):99-111.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Paul Helm (1993). The Providence of God. Intervarsity Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43. One trying to help (ed.) (1958). God's Plan for Humanity. Philadelphia: Dorrance.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. John Hick (2000). Richard Swinburne, Providence and the Problem of Evil. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (1):57-61.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Dewey J. Hoitenga Jr (1988). Predestination and Free Will. Faith and Philosophy 5 (4):463-466.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Arthur F. Holmes (1998). Reflections of Divine Providence. Faith and Philosophy 15 (2):147-150.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Michael A. Hoonhout (2002). Grounding Providence in the Theology of the Creator: The Exemplarity of Thomas Aquinas. Heythrop Journal 43 (1):1–19.
    Discussion of divine providence was traditionally grounded in the wisdom and benevolence of the Creator, until the impact of nominalism which narrowed the theological focus upon the absolute power and freedom of the divine will. An exemplary approach for discussing providence which predates nominalism and which has surprising contemporary relevance is the one developed by Thomas Aquinas in his Summa Theologiae. It is exemplary both for how it discusses providence and for what is says about it. Methodologically, Aquinas explains providence (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. David P. Hunt (2004). Providence, Foreknowledge, and Explanatory Loops: A Reply to Robinson. Religious Studies 40 (4):485-491.
    In a number of earlier papers I have attempted to defend the providential utility of simple foreknowledge as a via media between the accounts of divine providence offered by Molinists, on the one hand, and ‘open theists’, on the other. In the current issue of this journal, Michael Robinson argues that my response to one of the standard difficulties for simple foreknowledge – that its providential employment would generate explanatory loops – is inadequate. In the following paper I answer Robinson's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. David P. Hunt (2000). Thomas P. Flint, Divine Providence: The Molinist Account. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 47 (1):62-64.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. David P. Hunt (1993). Prescience and Providence. Faith and Philosophy 10 (3):428-438.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 116