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  1. Images, Dreams, Hallucinations, and Active, Imaginative Perception.Nigel J. T. Thomas - manuscript
    A comprehensive theory of the structure and cognitive function of the human imagination, and its relationship to perceptual experience, is developed, largely through a critique of the account propounded in Colin McGinn's Mindsight. McGinn eschews the highly deflationary (and unilluminating) views of imagination common amongst analytical philosophers, but fails to develop his own account satisfactorily because (owing to a scientifically outmoded understanding of visual perception) he draws an excessively sharp, qualitative distinction between imagination and perception (following Wittgenstein, Sartre, and others), (...)
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  2. Are There Epistemic Conditions Necessary for Demonstrative Thought?Michael Barkasi - forthcoming - Synthese:1-28.
    Starting with Gareth Evans, there’s an important tradition of theorizing about perception-based demonstrative thought which assigns necessary epistemic conditions to it. Its core idea is that demonstrative reference in thought is grounded in information links, understood as links which carry reliable information about their targets and which a subject exploits for demonstrative reference by tokening the mental files fed by these links. Perception, on these views, is not fundamental to perception-based demonstrative thought but is only the information link exploited in (...)
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  3. Enthusiasm and Platonic Furor in the Origins of Cartesian Science: The Olympian Dreams.Susana Gómez López - 2020 - Early Science and Medicine 25 (5):507-535.
    In the Olympica, the lost manuscript wherein Descartes described his famous three dreams, he wrote that on the night of Saint Martin in 1619 he felt asleep in a state of enthusiasm. He interpreted the dreams that ensued as the divine revelation of the principles of a new and admirable science. I here propose that the Olympica were a literary fiction devised by Descartes to legitimize his arrival on the philosophical scene by proposing the principles of a new science. The (...)
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  4. Imagination, Dreaming, and Hallucination.Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Imagination. London, UK: Taylor & Francis. pp. 149-62.
  5. Lucretius On Time and Its Perception.Pamela Zinn - 2016 - Kriterion - Journal of Philosophy 30 (2):125-151.
    This paper analyzes the ontology and epistemology of time in Lucretius’ De rerum natura. It uses the physiology of perception as well as epistemology to shed new light on the metaphysics. It presents an exegesis-based interpretation of the nature of time and of its perception, both arguing for and refining this interpretation by showing its explanatory power. The paper shows that Lucretius represents the perception of time or sensus temporis as a distinct sensory faculty, reconstructs how it emerges and operates, (...)
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  6. The Multidimensional Spectrum of Imagination: Images, Dreams, Hallucinations, and Active, Imaginative Perception.Nigel J. T. Thomas - 2014 - Humanities 3 (2):132-184.
    A theory of the structure and cognitive function of the human imagination that attempts to do justice to traditional intuitions about its psychological centrality is developed, largely through a detailed critique of the theory propounded by Colin McGinn. Like McGinn, I eschew the highly deflationary views of imagination, common amongst analytical philosophers, that treat it either as a conceptually incoherent notion, or as psychologically trivial. However, McGinn fails to develop his alternative account satisfactorily because (following Reid, Wittgenstein and Sartre) he (...)
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  7. Self-Interpretation of Student Dreams as a Tool for Personal Growth in General Education Classes.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2013 - In Paul Corrigan (ed.), General Education and University Curriculum Reform: An International Conference in Hong Kong. Hong Kong: CUHK and the Hong Kong America Centre. pp. 78-82.
    This chapter is based on a presentation I gave at a conference on General Education. It provides an overview of a course I teach on (Jungian) dream interpretation, focusing especially on the assessment criteria that make it possible to grade students' interpretations of their own dreams in a highly objective manner.
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  8. The Teleological Significance of Dreaming in Aristotle.Mor Segev - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 43:107-141.
    In his discussions of dreaming in the Parva Naturalia, Aristotle neither claims nor denies that dreams serve a natural purpose. Modern scholarship generally interprets dreaming as useless and teleologically irrelevant for him. I argue that Aristotle's teleology permits certain types of dream to have a natural role in end-directed processes. Dreams are left-overs from waking experience, but they may, like certain bodily residues, be used by nature, which does ‘nothing in vain’ and makes use of available resources, for the benefit (...)
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  9. Via Platonica zum Unbewussten. Platon und Freud (pdf: Inhaltszerzeichnis, Vegetti Vorwort, Einleitung).Marco Solinas - 2012 - Turia + Kant.
    Solinas’ Studie untersucht den Einfluss von Platons Anschauungen von Traum, Wunsch und Wahn auf den jungen Freud. Anhand der Untersuchung einiger zeitgenössischer kulturwissenschaftlicher Arbeiten, die bereits in die ersten Ausgabe der Traumdeutung Eingang fanden, wird Freuds nachhaltige Vertrautheit mit den platonischen Lehren erläutert und seine damit einhergehende direkte Textkenntnis der thematisch relevanten Stellen aus Platons Staat aufgezeigt. Die strukturelle Analogie von Freud’schem und platonischem Seelenbegriff wird inhaltlich am Traum als »Königsweg zum Unbewussten«, in dem von Freud selbst angesprochenen Verhältnis von (...)
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  10. La riscoperta della via regia. Freud lettore di Platone.Marco Solinas - 2012 - Psicoterapia E Scienze Umane (4):539-568.
    Starting with the reference to “Plato’s dictum” that Freud added in the second last page of the first edition of The Interpretation of Dreams, the author explains the convergences between the conception of dreams expounded by Plato in the Republic and Freud’s fundamental insights. The analysis of bibliographic sources used by Freud, and of his interests, allow than to suppose not only that Freud omitted to acknowledge the Plato’s theoretical genealogy of “the Via Regia to the unconscious”, but also the (...)
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  11. A Replication of the 5–7day Dream-Lag Effect with Comparison of Dreams to Future Events as Control for Baseline Matching. [REVIEW]Mark Blagrove, Josie Henley-Einion, Amanda Barnett, Darren Edwards & C. Heidi Seage - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):384-391.
    The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams , a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. Baseline matching (...)
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  12. Dreaming and Waking Experiences in Schizophrenia: How Should the (Dis)Continuity Hypotheses Be Approached Empirically?Valdas Noreika - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):349-352.
    A number of differences between the dreams of schizophrenia patients and those of healthy participants have been linked to changes in waking life that schizophrenia may cause. This way, the “continuity hypothesis” has become a standard way to relate dreaming and waking experiences in schizophrenia. Nevertheless, some of the findings in dream literature are not compatible with the continuity hypothesis and suggest some other ways how dream content and waking experiences could interact. Conceptually, the continuity hypothesis could be sharpened into (...)
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  13. 心理学入门 [Xin Li Xue Ru Men] / Chinese translation of Dreams of Wholeness.Stephen R. Palmquist - 2010 - Guilin: Guangxi Normal University Press.
    Published as Book Two of the Philopsychy Trilogy; translated by Zhai Pengxiao.
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  14. Neurobiology of Conscious and Unconscious Processes During Waking and Sleep.Claude Gottesmann - 2009 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 15 (2).
    Waking mind functioning comprises conscious and unconscious processes, with the latter being experimentally demonstrated by parapraxes and recent findings showing the active suppression of unwanted memories. According to psychoanalytic theory, these repression phenomena involve an unconscious censorship process. Today, neurobiological results show that this process seems to occur during waking rather than during the dreaming sleep stage.
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  15. The Phantom Limb in Dreams☆.Peter Brugger - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1272-1278.
    Mulder and colleagues [Mulder, T., Hochstenbach, J., Dijkstra, P. U., Geertzen, J. H. B. . Born to adapt, but not in your dreams. Consciousness and Cognition, 17, 1266–1271.] report that a majority of amputees continue to experience a normally-limbed body during their night dreams. They interprete this observation as a failure of the body schema to adapt to the new body shape. The present note does not question this interpretation, but points to the already existing literature on the phenomenology of (...)
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  16. The Impact of September 11 on Dreaming☆.Kelly Bulkeley & Tracey L. Kahan - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1248-1256.
    This study focuses on a set of dreams related to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and their aftermath, using content analysis and cognitive psychology to explore the interweaving of external public catastrophe and internal psychological processes. The study tests several recent claims in contemporary dream research, including the central image theory of Hartmann [Hartmann, E., & Basile, R. . Dream imagery becomes more intense after 9/11/01. Dreaming, 13, 61–66; Hartmann, E., & Brezler, T. . A systematic change in dreams (...)
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  17. Psiche: Platone e Freud. Desiderio, Sogno, Mania, Eros (pdf: indice, prefazione Vegetti, introduzione, capitolo I).Marco Solinas - 2008 - Firenze University Press.
    Psiche sets up a close-knit comparison between the psychology of Plato's Republic and Freud's psychoanalysis. Convergences and divergences are discussed in relation both to the Platonic conception of the oneiric emergence of repressed desires that prefigures the main path of Freud's subconscious, to the analysis of the psychopathologies related to these theoretical formulations and to the two diagnostic and therapeutic approaches adopted. Another crucial theme is the Platonic eros - the examination of which is also extended to the Symposium and (...)
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  18. Dreams and Dreaming in Disorders of Sleep.Sanford Auerbach - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 1--221.
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  19. The New Science of Dreaming.D. Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.) - 2007 - Praeger Publishers.
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  20. Personality and Dreaming.M. Blagrove - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 2--115.
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  21. Sacred Sleep: Scientific Contributions to the Study of Religiously Significant Dreaming.Kelly Bulkeley - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 3--71.
  22. Neuroimaging of REM Sleep and Dreaming.Thien Thanh Dang Vu, Manuel Schabus, Martin Desseilles, Sophie Schwartz & Pierre Maquet - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers.
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  23. The Nature and Functions of Dreaming.Ernest Hartmann - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 171--192.
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  24. Drugs and Dreams.J. Allan Hobson - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 1--85.
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  25. Evolution and the Interpretation of (REM Sleep) Dreams.Alan T. Lloyd - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 3--249.
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  26. Is the Threat Simulation Theory Threatened by Recurrent Dreams?Sophie Desjardins & Antonio Zadra - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):470-474.
    Zadra, Desjardins, and Marcotte tested several predictions derived from the Threat Simulation Theory of dreaming in a large sample of recurrent dreams. In response to these findings, Valli and Revonsuo presented a commentary outlining alternate conceptualizations and explanations for the results obtained. We argue that many points raised by Valli and Revonsuo do not accurately reflect our main findings and at times present a biased assessment of the data. In this article, we provide necessary clarifications and responses to each one (...)
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  27. Repression and Dreaming: An Open Empirical Question.Schredl Michael - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):531-532.
    From the perspective of modern dream research, Freud's hypotheses regarding repression and dreaming are difficult to evaluate. Several studies indicate that it is possible to study these topics empirically, but it needs a lot more empirical evidence, at least in the area of dream research, before arriving at a unified theory of repression.
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  28. Music in Dreams.Valeria Uga, Maria Chiara Lemut, Chiara Zampi, Iole Zilli & Piero Salzarulo - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):351-357.
    Music in dreams is rarely reported in scientific literature, while the presence of musical themes in dreams of famous musicians is anecdotally reported. We did a systematic investigation to evaluate whether the occurrence of musical dreams could be related to musical competence and practice, and to explore specific features of dreamt pieces. Thirty-five professional musicians and thirty non-musicians filled out a questionnaire about the characteristics of their musical activity and a structured dream log on the awakening for 30 consecutive days. (...)
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  29. Philosophers Explore the Matrix.Christopher Grau (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The Matrix trilogy is unique among recent popular films in that it is constructed around important philosophical questions--classic questions which have fascinated philosophers and other thinkers for thousands of years. Editor Christopher Grau here presents a collection of new, intriguing essays about some of the powerful and ancient questions broached by The Matrix and its sequels, written by some of the most prominent and reputable philosophers working today. They provide intelligent, accessible, and thought-provoking examinations of the philosophical issues that support (...)
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  30. Old Wine (Most of It) in New Bottles: Where Are Dreams and What is the Memory?Ramon Greenberg - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):72-73.
    I discuss how the work in Walker's article adds to the considerable body of research on dreaming, sleep, and memory that appeared in the early days of modern sleep research. I also consider the issue of REM-independent and REM-dependent kinds of learning. This requires including emotional issues in our discussion, and therefore emphasizes the importance of studying and understanding dreams.
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  31. Fondasi Psikologi Perkembangan - Menyelami mimpi, mencapai kematangan diri / Indonesian translation of Dreams of Wholeness.Stephen R. Palmquist & Muhammad Shodiq - 2005 - Yogyakarta: Pustaka Pelajar.
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  32. The Threat Simulation Theory of the Evolutionary Function of Dreaming: Evidence From Dreams of Traumatized Children.Katja Valli, Antti Revonsuo, Outi Pälkäs, Kamaran Hassan Ismail, Karzan Jalal Ali & Raija-Leena Punamäki - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):188-218.
    The threat simulation theory of dreaming states that dream consciousness is essentially an ancient biological defence mechanism, evolutionarily selected for its capacity to repeatedly simulate threatening events. Threat simulation during dreaming rehearses the cognitive mechanisms required for efficient threat perception and threat avoidance, leading to increased probability of reproductive success during human evolution. One hypothesis drawn from TST is that real threatening events encountered by the individual during wakefulness should lead to an increased activation of the system, a threat simulation (...)
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  33. Virtual Reality and Dreams: Towards the Autistic Condition?Thorsten Botz-Borstein - 2004 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (2):1-10.
    The virtual annuls all suspension of time that could, through its tragic or stylistic character, confer to time an existential value. This condition is contrasted with time as it functions in dreams. On the grounds of these observations it is shown that there are resemblances between “autistic” symptoms and the virtual world.
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  34. Poor Recall of Eye-Movement Signals From Stage 2 Compared to REM Sleep: Implications for Models of Dreaming.Russell Conduit, Sheila Gillard Crewther & Grahame Coleman - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):484-500.
    An ongoing assumption made by sleep researchers is that since dreams are more often recalled on awakening from rapid eye movement sleep, dreams must occur more often during this stage of sleep. An alternative hypothesis is that cognition occurs throughout sleep, but the recall of this mentation differs on awakening. When a dream is not reported on awakening, there is no method of establishing whether it did not happen or was forgotten. The aim of the present study was to investigate (...)
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  35. Children's Dreaming and the Development of Consciousness. [REVIEW]Mauricio Infante & Lloyd A. Wells - 2004 - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 43 (12):1519-1520.
  36. Unterdrückung, Traum und Unbewusstes in Platons „Politeia“ und bei Freud.Marco Solinas - 2004 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 111 (1):90-112.
    The essay concerns the reconstruction of the repression of desires, with reference to the analysis of their oneiric emersions expounded in the Republic, in comparison with Freud’s conception. Plato’s concept of suppression according to which specific desires are enslaved, so that they can find satisfaction usually only in dreams seems consistent with Freud’s concept of remotion; therefore both the condition of the suppressed desires and the intrapsychic place of their enslavement seem to be interpretable in the light of Freud’s concept (...)
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  37. The Dream of Language: Wittgenstein's Concept of Dreams in the Context of Style and Lebensform.Thorsten Botz–Bornstein - 2003 - Philosophical Forum 34 (1):73-89.
  38. Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account.J. Allan Hobson - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.
    Consciousness can be studied only if subjective experience is documented and quantified, yet first-person accounts of the effects of brain injury on conscious experience are as rare as they are potentially useful. This report documents the alterations in waking, sleeping, and dreaming caused by a lateral medullary infarct. Total insomnia and the initial suppression of dreaming was followed by the gradual recovery of both functions. A visual hallucinosis during waking that was associated with the initial period of sleep and dream (...)
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  39. Emotion and Cognition: Feeling and Character Identification in Dreaming.David Kahn, Edward Pace-Schott & J. Allan Hobson - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):34-50.
    This study investigated the relationship between dream emotion and dream character identification. Thirty-five subjects provided 320 dream reports and answers to questions on characters that appeared in their dreams. We found that emotions are almost always evoked by our dream characters and that they are often used as a basis for identifying them. We found that affection and joy were commonly associated with known characters and were used to identify them even when these emotional attributes were inconsistent with those of (...)
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  40. Commentary on Professor Hobson’s First-Person Account of a Lateral Medullary Stroke : Affirmative Action for the Brainstem in Consciousness Studies?Douglas F. Watt - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):391-395.
  41. Dreams in Place.Ian Hacking - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (3):245–260.
  42. Review of Michel Jouvet, the Paradox of Sleep: The Story of Dreaming; and Patricia Cox Miller, Dreams in Late Antiquity. [REVIEW]John Sutton - 2001 - Journal of the History of the Neurosciences 10:355-358.
    This review describes central difficulties in the interdisciplinary study of dreaming, summarizes Jouvet's account of his role in the history of modern dream science, queries his positive speculations on the semantics of dreaming, and suggests work for historians of neuroscience.
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  43. Sleep, Not Rem Sleep, is the Royal Road to Dreams.Alexander A. Borbély & Lutz Wittmann - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):911-912.
    The advent of functional imaging has reinforced the attempts to define dreaming as a sleep state-dependent phenomenon. PET scans revealed major differences between nonREM sleep and REM sleep. However, because dreaming occurs throughout sleep, the common features of the two sleep states, rather than the differences, could help define the prerequisite for the occurrence of dreams. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
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  44. How and Why the Brain Makes Dreams: A Report Card on Current Research on Dreaming.Rosalind Cartwright - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):914-916.
    The target articles in this volume address the three major questions about dreaming that have been most responsible for the delay in progress in this field over the past 25 years. These are: (1) Where in the brain is dreaming produced, given that dream reports can be elicited from sleep stages other than REM? (2) Do dream plots have any intrinsic meaning? (3) Does dreaming serve some specialized function? The answers offered here when added together support a new model of (...)
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  45. The Divorce of Rem Sleep and Dreaming.Anton Coenen - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):922-924.
    The validity of dream recall is discussed. What is the relation between the actual dream and its later reflection? Nielsen proposes differential sleep mentation, which is probably determined by dream accessibility. Solms argues that REM sleep and dreaming are double dissociable states. Dreaming occurs outside REM sleep when cerebral activation is high enough. That various active sleep states correlate with vivid dream reports implies that REM sleep and dreaming are single dissociable states. Vertes & Eastman reject that REM sleep is (...)
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  46. Mesolimbic Dopamine and the Neuropsychology of Dreaming: Some Caution and Reconsiderations.Fabrizio Doricchi & Cristiano Violani - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):930-931.
    New findings point to a role for mesolimbic DA circuits in the generation of dreaming. We disagree with Solms about these structures having an exclusive role in generating dreams. We review data suggesting that dreaming can be interrupted at different levels of processing and that anterior-subcortical lesions associated with dream cessation are unlikely to produce selective hypodopaminergic dynamic impairments. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  47. Dreaming is Not an Adaptation.Owen Flanagan - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):936-939.
    The five papers in this issue all deal with the proper evolutionary function of sleep and dreams, these being different. To establish that some trait of character is an adaptation in the strict biological sense requires a story about the fitness enhancing function it served when it evolved and possibly a story of how the maintenance of this function is fitness enhancing now. My aim is to evaluate the proposals put forward in these papers. My conclusion is that although sleep (...)
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  48. Dreaming Souls: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind: Sleep, Dreams, and the Evolution of the Conscious Mind.Owen Flanagan - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
    What, if anything, do dreams tell us about ourselves? What is the relationship between types of sleep and types of dreams? Does dreaming serve any purpose? Or are dreams simply meaningless mental noise--"unmusical fingers wandering over the piano keys"? With expertise in philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience, Owen Flanagan is uniquely qualified to answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, he provides both an accessible survey of the latest research on sleep and dreams and a compelling new theory about the nature (...)
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  49. Rem Mentation in Narcoleptics and Normals: An Empirical Test of Two Neurocognitive Theories.Roar Fosse - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):488-509.
    This study tested the two main neurocognitive models of dreaming by using cognitive data elicited from REM sleep in normals and narcoleptics. The two models were the ''activation-only'' view which holds that, in the context of sleep, overall activation of the brain is sufficient for consciousness to proceed in the manner of dreaming (e.g., Antrobus, 1991; Foulkes, 1993; Vogel, 1978); and the Activation, Input source, Modulation (AIM model), which predicts that not only brain activation level but also neurochemical modulatory systems (...)
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  50. The Dramaturgy of Dreams in Pleistocene Minds and Our Own.Keith Gunderson - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):946-947.
    The notion of simulation in dreaming of threat recognition and avoidance faces difficulties deriving from (1) some typical characteristics of dream artifacts (some “surreal,” some not) and (2) metaphysical issues involving the need for some representation in the theory of a perspective subject making use of the artifact. [Hobson et al.; Revonsuo].
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