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  1. The Legal Status of Unapproved Generic Drugs.Richard R. Abood - 1982 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 10 (1):24-28.
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  2. Pharmaceutical Drug Design Using Dynamic Connectionist Ensemble Networks.Ajith Abraham, Crina Grosan & Stefan Tigan - 2008 - In S. Iwata, Y. Oshawa, S. Tsumoto, N. Zhong, Y. Shi & L. Magnani (eds.), Communications and Discoveries From Multidisciplinary Data. Springer. pp. 221--231.
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  3. Psychotropic Medications and Direct-to-Consumer Advertising: Informative or Irresponsible?Natalie Achamallah - 2011 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 6:1-5.
    In 1997 the FDA relaxed restrictions on the practice of direct-to-consumer pharmaceutical advertising . The subsequent increase in advertisements aimed at potential patients had a signifi cant impact on rates of drug prescription. This paper gives a brief history of visual representations of mental illness used by DTCA and examines ethical concerns raised by DTCA, specifi cally for psychotropic medications. Issues discussed include overestimation of symptoms and over-prescription of unnecessary drugs, modifi cation of social perception and the perpetuation of stigma, (...)
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  4. The Changing Significance of Chance Experiments in Technological Development.Matthias Adam - manuscript
    Industrial drug design methodology has undergone remarkable changes in the recent history. Up to the 1970s, the screening of large numbers of randomly selected substances in biological test system was often a crucial step in the development of novel drugs. From the early 1980s, such ‘blind’ screening was increasingly rejected by many pharmaceutical researchers and gave way to ‘rational drug design’, a method that grounds the design of new drugs on a detailed mechanistic understanding of the drug action. Surprisingly, however, (...)
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  5. Integrating Research and Development: The Emergence of Rational Drug Design in the Pharmaceutical Industry.Matthias Adam - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 36 (3):513-537.
    Rational drug design is a method for developing new pharmaceuticals that typically involves the elucidation of fundamental physiological mechanisms. It thus combines the quest for a scientific understanding of natural phenomena with the design of useful technology and hence integrates epistemic and practical aims of research and development. Case studies of the rational design of the cardiovascular drugs propranolol, captopril and losartan provide insights into characteristics and conditions of this integration. Rational drug design became possible in the 1950s when theoretical (...)
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  6. Prescription Drug Labeling and “Over‐Warning”: The Disturbing Case of Diana Levine and Wyeth Pharmaceutical.Ronald J. Adams - 2010 - Business and Society Review 115 (2):231-248.
    ABSTRACTIn April of 2000, Diana Levine went to a clinic in Vermont suffering from a migraine headache. She was given the drug Demerol for the migraine symptoms and Phenergan for nausea. Complications with the administration of Phenergan ultimately resulted in Ms. Levine contracting gangrene, necessitating the amputation of her right arm. Ms. Levine sued the drug maker, Wyeth Pharmaceutical, in state court and prevailed. The lower court's decision was appealed by Wyeth to the state supreme court where the ruling was (...)
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  7. The Regulation of American Industry.W. Adams - 1958 - Diogenes 6 (24):65-81.
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  8. Ethical Relation Between Physicians and Pharmaceutical Industries in the Perspectives of Bangladesh.Shahinul Alam, Nahiduz Saman, Monsur Hallaj Hallaj, Jahangir Ul Alam & Shoaib Momen Majumder - 2015 - Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):1.
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  9. Data-Sharing Dilemmas: Allowing Pharmaceutical Company Access to Research Data.James Anderson & Toby Schonfeld - 2009 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 31 (3):17-19.
    Pharmaceutical companies can dramatically improve their understanding of how certain drugs work by having access to data from prospective research participants and those enrolled in clinical trials. Yet can data legitimately be used in ways that these individuals have not specifically authorized? In some cases it is ethically acceptable to share data with pharmaceutical companies even if there was no specific consent to do so by appealing to the principles of beneficence and respect for persons. These principles require us to (...)
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  10. Patent Funded Access to Medicines.Tom Andreassen - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):152-161.
    Instead of impeding access to essential medicines in developing countries, the essay explores why and how patents can serve as a source of funding for the much needed access to medicine. Instead of a weakening of patents, prolonged protection periods are suggested in circumstances where there is widespread lack of access. The revenues from extended patents are seen as a source of funding for drug donations to the least developed countries.
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  11. At Law: FDA's Compassion for Desperate Drug Companies.George J. Annas - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (1):35.
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  12. FDA's Compassion for Desperate Drug Companies.George J. Annas - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (1):35-37.
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  13. Substance Abuse Is a Disease of the Human Brain: Focus on Alcohol.Raymond Anton - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (4):735-744.
    Alcohol and substance abuse are prevalent in our society. Advances in neuroscience have led to a clearer understanding of the effects of abused substances on the brain. Clues are now available regarding how a person goes from a “user” to being addicted based on brain chemistry, anatomy, and genetic risk. During this process the person loses at least partial, if not complete, control, over their compulsive substance use. This article attempts to put modern notions of alcohol and substance abuse and (...)
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  14. Contact with Pharmaceutical Representatives: Where Does Prudence Lead?Paul Appelbaum - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):11-13.
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  15. Is Marketing the Enemy of Pharmaceutical Innovation?Kalman Applbaum - 2009 - Hastings Center Report 39 (4):13-17.
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  16. Viagra Selfhood: Pharmaceutical Advertising and the Visual Formation of Swedish Masculinity. [REVIEW]Cecilia Åsberg & Ericka Johnson - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (2):144-157.
    Using material from the Pfizer sponsored website providing health information on erectile dysfunction to potential Swedish Viagra customers (www.potenslinjen.se), this article explores the public image of masculinity in relation to sexual health and the cultural techniques for creating pharmaceutical appeal. We zoom in on the targeted ideal users of Viagra, and the nationalized, racialized and sexualized identities they are assigned. As part of Pfizer’s marketing strategy of adjustments to fit the local consumer base, the ways in which Viagra is promoted (...)
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  17. Access to Essential Medicines: A Hobbesian Social Contract Approach.Richard E. Ashcroft - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (2):121–141.
    ABSTRACTMedicines that are vital for the saving and preserving of life in conditions of public health emergency or endemic serious disease are known as essential medicines. In many developing world settings such medicines may be unavailable, or unaffordably expensive for the majority of those in need of them. Furthermore, for many serious diseases these essential medicines are protected by patents that permit the patent‐holder to operate a monopoly on their manufacture and supply, and to price these medicines well above marginal (...)
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  18. Physician Pharmaceutical Industry Interaction: An Indian Outlook.Ganesh Athappan - 2007 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 17 (5):131-132.
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  19. Adherence to the Australian National Inpatient Medication Chart: The Efficacy of a Uniform National Drug Chart on Improving Prescription Error.Alp Atik - 2013 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):769-772.
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  20. Why Drug Policy Is So Harsh.James B. Bakalar & Lester Grinspoon - 1983 - Hastings Center Report 13 (4):34-39.
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  21. A Paradoxical Ethical Framework for Unpredictable Drug Shortages.Rebecca Bamford, C. D. Brewer, Bayly Bucknell, Heather DeGrote, Loren Fabry, Madeleine E. M. Hammerlund & Bryan M. Weisbrod - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):16 - 18.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 16-18, January 2012.
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  22. Review of Sonia Shah. The Body Hunters: How the Drug Industry Tests its Products on the World's Poorest Patients. [REVIEW]Jennifer S. Bard - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):52 – 53.
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  23. Review Essay / Public Decisions and Private Rights.Randy E. Barnett - 1984 - Criminal Justice Ethics 3 (2):50-62.
    John Kaplan, The Hardest Drug: Heroin and Public Policy Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1983, xi + 247 pp.
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  24. Access to Medicines and the Rhetoric of Responsibility.Christian Barry & Kate Raworth - 2002 - Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):57–70.
    In Africa fewer than 50,000 people—less than 2 percent of the people in need—currently receive ARV therapy. These facts have elicited strongly divergent reactions, and views about the appropriate response to this crisis have varied widely.
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  25. Pharmaceutical Company Corruption and the Moral Crisis in Medicine.Sharon Batt - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (4):10-13.
    A much-debated series of articles in the New England Journal of Medicine in May 2015 labeled the pharmaceutical industry's critics “pharmascolds.” Having followed the debate for two decades, I count myself among the scolds. The weight of the evidence overwhelmingly supports the claim that pharmaceutical policy no longer serves the public interest; the central questions now are how this happened and what to do about it. I approached three of the most recent books on the industry with these questions in (...)
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  26. Drugs and Justice: Seeking a Consistent, Coherent, Comprehensive View.Margaret P. Battin, Erik Luna, Arthur G. Lipman, Paul M. Gahlinger, Douglas E. Rollins, Jeanette C. Roberts & Troy L. Booher - 2008 - Oup Usa.
    This compact and innovative book tackles one of the central issues in drug policy: the lack of a coherent conceptual structure for thinking about drugs. Drugs generally fall into one of seven categories: prescription, over the counter, alternative medicine, common-use drugs like alcohol, tobacco and caffeine; religious-use, sports enhancement; and of course illegal street drugs like cocaine and marijuana. Our thinking and policies varies wildly from one to the other, with inconsistencies that derive more from cultural and social values than (...)
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  27. Narrowing the Gap.A. Bayley - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (1):51-53.
    Since 1981 AIDS has illuminated, like a roving searchlight, a series of ethical questions, which extend far beyond the apparently narrow limits of one disease. It has revealed, one by one, human attitudes and behaviours that were previously unquestioned, or unobserved - based on unidentified but shaky pre-suppositions.This commentary offers two contrasting perspectives on the problems facing developing countries. In the first part, I comment on the preceding article, from the perspective of a clinician who has worked for many years (...)
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  28. Drug Utilization Review: A Description of Use for a Medicaid Population (Maryland) 1986?1994.Richard D. Baylis - 1994 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 22 (3):247-251.
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  29. Collaborating with the Pharmaceutical Industry: An Aboriginal Perspective.Jack Beetson - 2011 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):326-328.
    Firstly I would like to acknowledge the Traditional Owners whose land we are meeting on today. I acknowledge that I stand before you on the shoulders of Indigenous Peoples globally, past and present that have been marginalised, had their knowledge exploited, and generally had their inherent native title rights ripped off for the financial and health benefit of others.
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  30. Drug Familiarization and Therapeutic Misconception Via Direct-to-Consumer Information.Jean-Christophe Bélisle-Pipon & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2015 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (2):259-267.
    Promotion of prescription drugs may appear to be severely limited in some jurisdictions due to restrictions on direct-to-consumer advertising. However, in most jurisdictions, strategies exist to raise consumer awareness about prescription drugs, notably through the deployment of direct-to-consumer information campaigns that encourage patients to seek help for particular medical conditions. In Canada, DTCI is presented by industry and regulated by Health Canada as being purely informational activities, but their design and integration in broader promotional campaigns raise very similar ethical concerns (...)
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  31. Consumer Believability of Information in Direct-to-Consumer (DTC) Advertising of Prescription Drugs.Richard F. Beltramini - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (4):333 - 343.
    Direct to consumer (DTC) advertising has attracted significant research attention, yet none has focused on empirical assessments of its overall impact on U.S. consumers nationally, and tying assessment to relevant behavioral outcomes. This paper addresses the ethical issue of DTC advertising providing a balance of product and risk information that is both understandable and believable, and contributes direction to those exploring this phenomenon.
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  32. Responding to Vulnerability: The Case of Injection Drug Use.Elizabeth Ben-Ishai - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):39-63.
    "Before they were 'junkies,' they were kids." The words appear on a poster, beneath a montage of photographs of children and the text: "Save Insite." Insite, located in Vancouver, Canada, is North America's first and only supervised injection facility (SIF). At Insite, people who use injection drugs can inject previously obtained drugs, such as heroin and cocaine, under medical supervision, using sterile equipment provided by this government-run facility. Opened under the auspices of a three-year exemption from federal drug laws in (...)
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  33. Canadian Pharmaceuticals.S. R. Benatar - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 34 (5):7-7.
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  34. Ethical Responsibilities in European Drug Research.P. N. Bennett & European Ethical Review Committee - 1990
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  35. Good Clinical Practice and Ethics in European Drug Research.P. N. Bennett, European Ethical Review Committee & European Foundation for Good Clinical Practice - 1994
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  36. Pharmaceutical Industry Influences on Physician Prescribing: Gifts, Quasi-Gifts, and Patient-Directed Gifts.Jeffrey T. Berger - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):56-57.
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  37. Sociomoral Development and Drug and Alcohol Abuse.Marvin W. Berkowitz, Nancy Guerra & Larry Nucci - 1991 - In William M. Kurtines & Jacob L. Gewirtz (eds.), Handbook of Moral Behavior and Development. L. Erlbaum. pp. 3--35.
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  38. Italian Drug Policy: Ethical Aims of Essential Assistance Levels. [REVIEW]Alessandra Bernardi & Renzo Pegoraro - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (4):279-286.
    In 2001 the Italian Government defined Essential Assistance Levels (LEA), which can be considered as an important step forward in the health care system. The Italian health care system would provide payment of essential and uniform aid services in order to safeguard many values such as human dignity, personal health, equal assistance and good health practices. The Ministry of Health has worked to rationalize the National Formulary and to define evaluation methods for drugs in order to choose what to reimburse (...)
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  39. Institutionalizing Dissent: A Proposal for an Adversarial System of Pharmaceutical Research.Justin Biddle - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (4):325-353.
    Many observers now acknowledge that there are serious problems with the way in which pharmaceutical research is currently practiced. These problems include the suppression of undesirable results, bias in the design of studies and in the interpretation of results, and neglect of diseases that afflict the poor in developing countries. These problems can be traced at least in part to the influence of commercial interests on research. In what follows, I will discuss some of the main deficiencies of current pharmaceutical (...)
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  40. Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma has Corrupted Healthcare by Peter Gøtzsche.Justin B. Biddle - 2016 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (2):40-43.
    From the title, Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma has Corrupted Healthcare, Peter Gøtzsche makes the thesis of his book very clear. Not only does the pharmaceutical industry contribute to detrimental health outcomes through biased research, deceptive marketing, and disease mongering, but the industry’s business model meets the criteria of an organized criminal operation. Gøtzsche argues for this in two parts. First, he defines organized crime by drawing upon the United States Organized Crime Control Act of 1970, the (...)
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  41. Filling in the Gaps: Priming and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler - 2015 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (2):193-230.
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  42. Feeling Is Believing: Evaluative Conditioning and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):271-279.
    A central goal in regulating direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals is to ensure that explicit drug claims are truthful. Yet imagery can also alter viewer attitudes, and the degree to which this occurs in DTCA is uncertain. Addressing this data gap, we provide evidence that positive feelings produced by images can promote favourable beliefs about pharmaceuticals. We had participants view a fictitious anti-influenza drug paired with unrelated images that elicited either positive, neutral or negative feelings. Participants who viewed positive images (...)
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  43. Ban the Sunset? Nonpropositional Content and Regulation of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):3-13.
    The risk that direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals (DTCA) may increase inappropriate medicine use is well recognized. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration addresses this concern by subjecting DTCA content to strict scrutiny. Its strictures are, however, heavily focused on the explicit claims made in commercials, what we term their ?propositional content.? Yet research in social psychology suggests advertising employs techniques to influence viewers via nonpropositional content, for example, images and music. We argue that one such technique, evaluative conditioning, is (...)
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  44. Developing Nations and the Compulsory License: Maximizing Access to Essential Medicines While Minimizing Investment Side Effects.Robert C. Bird - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37 (2):209-221.
    This manuscript addresses how developing countries can maximize access to essential medicines and minimize unwanted side-effects within the legal environment of a compulsory license regime. While compulsory licensing can play a role in improving public health, external social and political conditions must be considered in order to make licensing an effective practice.
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  45. Criminal Law, Policing Policy, and HIV Risk in Female Street Sex Workers and Injection Drug Users.Kim M. Blankenship & Stephen Koester - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 30 (4):548-559.
  46. War on Black Men: Arguments for the Legalization of Drugs.Walter E. Block & Violet Obioha - 2012 - Criminal Justice Ethics 31 (2):106-120.
    Abstract The leadership of the black community is concerned with welfare, with equality, with unemployment, with discrimination, with racism, with the pay gap, and with dozens of other such traditional issues. Oh, yes, they are also apprehensive about the use of addictive drugs. But, as we speak, young male members of this community are being incarcerated at frightful rates, and, even worse, are killing each other to boot. One would think that this latter issue would occupy the interest of black (...)
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  47. Between the Quack and the Fanatic: Movements in Our Self-Belief. [REVIEW]Jonathan Bolton - 2011 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):281-285.
    Separate from the question of whether our patients believe us as doctors is the question of whether we ourselves believe in our healing ‘performances’. Borrowing from Bernard Williams’ model of truth based on the two irreducible virtues of sincerity and accuracy, this article describes a spectrum of states of self-belief, from the quack who does not believe in his acts to the fanatic who does not ‘dis-believe’, with ranges of pious fraud and bad faith in between and on either side (...)
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  48. Ethical Issues Related to the Access to Orphan Drugs in Brazil: The Case of Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I.Raquel Boy, Ida V. D. Schwartz, Bárbara C. Krug, Luiz C. Santana-da-Silva, Carlos E. Steiner, Angelina X. Acosta, Erlane M. Ribeiro, Marcial F. Galera, Paulo G. C. Leivas & Marlene Braz - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):233-239.
    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is a rare lysosomal storage disorder treated with bone marrow transplantation or enzyme replacement therapy with laronidase, a high-cost orphan drug. Laronidase was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2003 and by the Brazilian National Health Surveillance Agency in 2005. Many Brazilian MPS I patients have been receiving laronidase despite the absence of a governmental policy regulating access to the drug. Epidemiological and treatment data concerning MPS I (...)
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  49. Corporate Crime in the Pharmaceutical Industry.John Braithwaite - 1984
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  50. Cheap Trinkets, Effective Marketing: Small Gifts From Drug Companies to Physicians.Allan S. Brett - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):52-54.
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