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  1. Intensive Animal Agriculture and Human Health.Jonathan Anomaly - 2019 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Animal Ethics. New York: Routledge.
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  2. Antibiotics and Animal Agriculture: The Need for Global Collective Action.Jonny Anomaly - 2018 - In Michael Selgelid (ed.), Ethics and Antimicrobial Resistance. New York: Springer.
  3. Review of Jessica Flanigan, Pharmaceutical Freedom. [REVIEW]Jonny Anomaly - 2018 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:x-y.
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  4. Ethics, Antibiotics, and Public Policy.Jonny Anomaly - 2017 - Georgetown Journal of Law and Public Policy 15 (2).
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  5. Collective Action and Individual Choice.Jonny Anomaly - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):752-756.
    Governments across the globe have squandered treasure and imprisoned millions of their own citizens by criminalising the use and sale of recreational drugs. But use of these drugs has remained relatively constant, and the primary victims are the users themselves. Meanwhile, antimicrobial drugs that once had the power to cure infections are losing their ability to do so, compromising the health of people around the world. The thesis of this essay is that policymakers should stop wasting resources trying to fight (...)
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  6. Combating Resistance: The Case for a Global Antibiotics Treaty.Jonny Anomaly - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):13-22.
  7. Review of Brad Spellberg, Rising Plague: The Global Threat From Deadly Bacteria and Our Dwindling Arsenal to Fight Them. [REVIEW]Jonny Anomaly - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (11):39-41.
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  8. Cognitive Self‐Enhancement as a Duty to Oneself: A Kantian Perspective.Katharina Bauer - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):36-58.
    Recently some bioethicists and neuroscientists have argued for an imperative of chemical cognitive enhancement. This imperative is usually based on consequentialist grounds. In this paper, the topic of cognitive self-enhancement is discussed from a Kantian point of view in order to shed new light on the controversial debate. With Kant, it is an imperfect duty to oneself to strive for perfecting one’s own natural and moral capacities beyond one’s natural condition, but there is no duty to enhance others. A Kantian (...)
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  9. Geographic Variations in Electronic Cigarette Advertisements on Twitter in the United States.Hongying Dai, Michael J. Deem & Jianqiang Hao - 2017 - International Journal of Public Health 62 (4):479-487.
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  10. Doping Is Bad In Sport Because Doping Is Bad For Sport.John William Devine - 2013 - Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh 43:41-43.
  11. Doping is a Threat to Sporting Excellence.John William Devine - 2011 - British Journal of Sports Medicine 45 (8):637-639.
    Savulescu et al have argued that the risk to athletes' welfare provides the only legitimate ground for restricting the use of performance enhancing drugs in sport. In this paper, it is argued that the idea of `sport', properly understood, provides further reason to impose such restrictions. A `balance of excellences' argument is proposed whereby doping is considered objectionable on account of its disrupting the relation between the excellences around which sporting competition is organised. We have reason to restrict the use (...)
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  12. Drugs: Mode of Action, Prevalence and Reasons for Use.Michael Herbert - 2006 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 11 (3):4.
    Herbert, Michael Several children are experiencing behavioural and psychological problems at a younger age, due to the harms inflicted by illicit drug use. Professor Patrick McGorry of Orygen Youth Health, an organisation helping teenagers with mental health problems, believes that many young people experiment with drugs recreationally and for fun, but the situation gets worse once it becomes necessary as a relief from their problems.
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  13. A Problem for Achieving Informed Choice.Adam la Caze - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (4):255-265.
    Most agree that, if all else is equal, patients should be provided with enough information about proposed medical therapies to allow them to make an informed decision about what, if anything, they wish to receive. This is the principle of informed choice; it is closely related to the notion of informed consent. Contemporary clinical trials are analysed according to classical statistics. This paper puts forward the argument that classical statistics does not provide the right sort of information for informing choice. (...)
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  14. On Treating Athletes with Banned Substances: The Relationship Between Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Hypopituitarism, and Hormone Replacement Therapy.Sarah Malanowski & Nicholas Baima - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (1):27-38.
    Until recently, the problem of traumatic brain injury in sports and the problem of performance enhancement via hormone replacement have not been seen as related issues. However, recent evidence suggests that these two problems may actually interact in complex and previously underappreciated ways. A body of recent research has shown that traumatic brain injuries, at all ranges of severity, have a negative effect upon pituitary function, which results in diminished levels of several endogenous hormones, such as growth hormone and gonadotropin. (...)
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  15. 'Cosmetic Neurology' and the Moral Complicity Argument.A. Ravelingien, J. Braeckman, L. Crevits, D. De Ridder & E. Mortier - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (3):151-162.
    Over the past decades, mood enhancement effects of various drugs and neuromodulation technologies have been proclaimed. If one day highly effective methods for significantly altering and elevating one’s mood are available, it is conceivable that the demand for them will be considerable. One urgent concern will then be what role physicians should play in providing such services. The concern can be extended from literature on controversial demands for aesthetic surgery. According to Margaret Little, physicians should be aware that certain aesthetic (...)
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  16. Homeopathy and Medical Ethics.David Shaw - 2011 - Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies 16 (1):17-21.
    Homeopathy has been the subject of intense academic, media and public debate in recent months. Those opposed to the practice, which treats like with like by using ultra-dilute remedies, argue that it is an ineffective non-treatment that is not supported by evidence and should not be funded on the National Health Service. Its proponents claim that it is effective (although they disagree about whether it is more effective than placebo) and argue its use is appropriate for certain conditions. This paper (...)
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  17. Prescribing Placebos Ethically: The Appeal of Negatively Informed Consent.David Shaw - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (2):97-99.
    Kihlbom has recently argued that a system of seeking negatively informed consent might be preferable in some cases to the ubiquitous informed consent model. Although this theory is perhaps not powerful enough to supplant informed consent in most settings, it lends strength to Evans’ and Hungin’s proposal that it can be ethical to prescribe placebos rather than "active" drugs. This paper presents an argument for using negatively informed consent for the specific purpose of authorising the use of placebos in clinical (...)
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  18. Minimizing Harm Via Psychological Intervention: Response to Glannon.Joshua Shepherd - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):662-663.
    In a recent discussion, Walter Glannon discusses a number of ways we might try to minimize harm to patients who experience intraoperative awareness. In this response I direct attention to a possibility that deserves further attention. It might be that a kind of psychological intervention – namely, informing patients of the possibility of intraoperative awareness and of what to expect in such a case – would constitute a unique way to respect patient autonomy, as well as minimize the harm that (...)
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  19. Drogues : ordre et désordres. Revue Mouvements n° 86.Anna C. Zielinska & Noé Le Blanc (eds.) - 2017 - Paris: Découverte.
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