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  1. The Affective Extension of ‘Family’ in the Context of Changing Elite Business Networks.Zografia Bika & Michael L. Frazer - forthcoming - Human Relations.
    Drawing on 49 oral-history interviews with Scottish family business owner-managers, six key-informant interviews, and secondary sources, this interdisciplinary study analyses the decline of kinship-based connections and the emergence of new kinds of elite networks around the 1980s. As the socioeconomic context changed rapidly during this time, cooperation built primarily around literal family ties could not survive unaltered. Instead of finding unity through bio-legal family connections, elite networks now came to redefine their ‘family businesses’ in terms of affectively loaded ‘family values’ (...)
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  2. Active Powers of the Human Mind.Ruth Boeker - forthcoming - In Scottish Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century, vol. 2. Oxford:
  3. Locke's Moral Psychology.Ruth Boeker - forthcoming - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. Routledge.
    In this chapter, I discuss Locke’s contributions to moral psychology. I begin by examining how we acquire moral ideas, according to Locke. Next, I ask what explains why we act morally. I address this question by showing how Locke reconciles hedonist views concerning moral motivation with his commitment to divine law theory. Then I turn to Shaftesbury’s criticism that Locke’s moral view is a self-interested moral theory that undermines virtue. In response to the criticism I draw attention to Locke’s Christian (...)
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  4. Teaching & Learning Guide For: Shaftesbury on Persons, Personal Identity and Character Development.Ruth Boeker - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (8).
  5. Shaftesbury on Liberty and Self-Mastery.Ruth Boeker - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):731-752.
    The aim of this paper is to show that Shaftesbury’s thinking about liberty is best understood in terms of self-mastery. To examine his understanding of liberty, I turn to a painting that he commissioned on the ancient theme of the choice of Hercules and the notes that he prepared for the artist. Questions of human choice are also present in the so-called story of an amour, which addresses the difficulties of controlling human passions. Jaffro distinguishes three notions of self-control that (...)
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  6. New Perspectives on Agency in Early Modern Philosophy.Ruth Boeker - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):625-630.
    This introductory article outlines the themes and aims of this special issue, which offers new perspectives on early modern debates about agency in two ways: First, it recovers writings on agency and liberty that have been widely neglected or that have received insufficient attention, including writings by Anne Conway, Henry More, Ralph Cudworth, William King, Gabrielle Suchon, Elizabeth Berkeley Burnet, Mary Astell, and Anthony Ashley Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury. Second, it reveals the richness of early modern debates about (...)
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  7. Shaftesbury on Persons, Personal Identity, and Character Development.Ruth Boeker - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (1):e12471.
    Shaftesbury’s major work Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times was one of the most influential English works in the eighteenth century. This paper focuses on his contributions to debates about persons and personal identity and shows that Shaftesbury regards metaphysical questions of personal identity as closely connected with normative questions of character development. I argue that he is willing to accept that persons are substances and that he takes their continued existence for granted. He sees the need to supplement metaphysical (...)
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  8. Silencing Theodicy with Enthusiasm: Aesthetic Experience as a Response to the Problem of Evil in Shaftesbury, Annie Dillard, and the Book of Job.John McAteer - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (5):788-795.
    The problem of evil is not only a logical problem about God's goodness but also an existential problem about the sense of God's presence, which the Biblical book of Job conceives as a problem of aesthetic experience. Thus, just as theism can be grounded in religious experience, atheism can be grounded in experience of evil. This phenomenon is illustrated by two contrasting literary descriptions of aesthetic experience by Jean-Paul Sartre and Annie Dillard. I illuminate both of these literary texts with (...)
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  9. How to Be a Moral Taste Theorist.John McAteer - 2016 - Essays in Philosophy 17 (1):05-21.
    In this paper, I attempt to recover an 18th Century approach to moral theory that can be called Moral Taste Theory. Through an exploration of 18th Century sources I define the characteristics of moral taste theory and to distinguish it from its closest rival, moral sense theory. In general a moral taste theorist holds that moral judgments are analogous to aesthetic judgments while a moral sense theorist holds that moral judgments are analogous to physical sense perception. Francis Hutcheson was a (...)
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  10. Shaftesbury, Stoicism, and Philosophy as a Way of Life.John Sellars - 2016 - Sophia 55 (3):395-408.
    This paper examines Shaftesbury’s reflections on the nature of philosophy in his Askêmata notebooks, which draw heavily on the Roman Stoics Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. In what follows, I introduce the notebooks, outline Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy therein, compare it with his discussions of the nature of philosophy in his published works, and conclude by suggesting that Pierre Hadot’s conception of ‘philosophy as a way of life’ offers a helpful framework for thinking about Shaftesbury’s account of philosophy.
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  11. George Berkeley's Understanding of Beauty and His Polemic with Shaftesbury.Adam Grzelinski - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 209-226.
  12. Shaftesbury’s Place in the History of Moral Realism.T. H. Irwin - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (4):865-882.
    Whewell and ShaftesburyIn contemporary moral philosophy ‘moral realism’ refers to a position in the metaphysics of morality that is analogous to realism about ordinary objects, and to scientific realism about theoretical entities. It is a realist doctrine in contrast to non-cognitivism, constructivism, fictionalism, and nihilism about moral judgments and moral properties. But while these particular contrasts are characteristic of contemporary philosophy, realism itself is much older. Ross, Prichard, and Sidgwick, for instance, hold realist views in the metaphysics of morals, though (...)
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  13. Gewissen. Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven auf das 18. Jahrhundert.Katerina Mihaylova & Simon Bunke - 2015 - Würzburg, Deutschland: Königshausen & Neumann.
  14. Shaftesbury—An Important Forgotten Indirect Source of Kierkegaard’s Thought.Lydia B. Amir - 2014 - Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1):189-216.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook Jahrgang: 19 Heft: 1 Seiten: 189-216.
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  15. The British Aesthetic Tradition: From Shaftesbury to Wittgenstein by Timothy M. Costelloe.Theodore Gracyk - 2014 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):848-849.
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  16. Humor and the Good Life in Modern Philosophy: Shaftesbury, Hamann, Kierkegaard.Amir Lydia - 2014 - State University of New York Press,.
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  17. Pathologia, A Theory of the Passions.Laurent Jaffro, Christian Maurer & Alain Petit - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (2):221-240.
    The present article is an edition of the Pathologia (1706), a Latin manuscript on the passions by Anthony Ashley Cooper, the third Earl of Shaftesbury (1671–1713). There are two parts, i) an introduction with commentary (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2012.679795), and ii) an edition of the Latin text with an English translation (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2012.679796) . The Pathologia treats of a series of topics concerning moral psychology, ethics and philology, presenting a reconstruction of the Stoic theory of the emotions that is closely modelled on Cicero and (...)
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  18. Reading Shaftesbury's Pathologia: An Illustration and Defence of the Stoic Account of the Emotions.Christian Maurer & Laurent Jaffro - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (2):207-220.
    The present article is an edition of the Pathologia (1706), a Latin manuscript on the passions by Anthony Ashley Cooper, the third Earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713). There are two parts, i) an introduction with commentary (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2012.679795), and ii) an edition of the Latin text with an English translation (http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01916599.2012.679796) . The Pathologia treats of a series of topics concerning moral psychology, ethics and philology, presenting a reconstruction of the Stoic theory of the emotions that is closely modelled on Cicero and (...)
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  19. The Nature of Virtue.Dario Perinetti - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 333.
    This chapter examines the different answers that British moralists gave to the question ‘what does virtue consist in?’ Rather than as a royal road to present-day views in ethics, their answers are best understood when considered against the background of early modern natural law theories and their projected metaphysics of morals. The emerging ‘science of morality’ dealt with the metaphysical problem of determining what sort of thing virtue is. Considered from this vantage point, the British moralists struggled with the problem (...)
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  20. Second Characters or the Language of Forms.Benjamin Rand (ed.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Anthony Ashley Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury was an English philosopher and author. Originally published in 1914, this book presents the edited text of the sequel to Cooper's major work, Characteristics. An editorial introduction and detailed notes are included. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in Cooper's writings and philosophy.
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  21. Standard Edition: Complete Works, Correspondence and Posthumous Writings. [REVIEW]John Sellars - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):613-616.
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  22. Family Trees: Sympathy, Comparison, and the Proliferation.Amy M. Schmitter - 2012 - In Martin Pickavé & Lisa Shapiro (eds.), Emotion and Cognitive Life in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 255.
  23. Le "Chartae Socraticae" di Shaftesbury. [REVIEW]Stefano Bacin - 2011 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 7 (3):696-697.
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  24. Environmental Aesthetics Beyond the Dialectics of Interest and Disinterest Deconstructing the Myth of Pristine Nature.Antony Fredriksson - 2011 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 22 (40-41).
    In this paper I want to scrutinize one of the key ideas within modern Western aesthetics. Beauty is often considered to derive from a virtuous disinterested attitude towards nature. This kind of view has been advocated by thinkers such as Shaftesbury and Kant in the beginning of the so-called aesthetic turn in philosophy. The problem with this view is that it presupposes that nature exists by itself before human intervention in a kind of ideal pristine state. My hypothesis is that (...)
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  25. Shaftesbury : cartas a un estudiante universitario.Ramón Imaz Franco - 2011 - Endoxa 27:337.
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  26. Shaftesbury.Michael Macomber - 2011 - Philosophical Forum 42 (3):301-301.
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  27. Shaftesbury.John McAteer - 2011 - In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Anthony Ashley Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713) was an English philosopher who profoundly influenced 18th century thought in Britain, France, and Germany, particularly in the areas of aesthetics, ethics, and religion.
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  28. “Imagination” e “moral sense”: un contributo alla teoria dell'immaginazione in Shaftesbury.Andrea Olivieri - 2011 - Aisthesis: Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 4 (2).
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  29. Sztuka. Dialog dedykowany milordowi Shaftesbury\'emu.L. ’abbé Charles Batteux - 2009 - Filo-Sofija 9 (9):199-208.
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  30. Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson: Contesting Diversity in the Enlightenment and Beyond. [REVIEW]James Delbourgo - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):459-461.
  31. Niematerialność sztuki w estetyce XVIII wieku. Rozważania Charlesa Batteux nad myślą lorda Shaftesbury\'ego.Kinga Kaśkiewicz - 2009 - Filo-Sofija 9 (9):73-82.
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  32. Anthony Ashley Cooper, conte di Shaftesbury, Scritti morali e politici.M. Quaranta - 2009 - Iride: Filosofia e Discussione Pubblica 22 (56):253.
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  33. Outward, Visible Propriety: Stoic Philosophy and Eighteenth-Century British Rhetorics.Lois Peters Agnew - 2008 - University of South Carolina Press.
    Introduction -- Stoic ethics and rhetoric -- Eighteenth-century common sense and sensus communis -- Taste and sensus communis -- Propriety, sympathy, and style fusing individual and social -- Victorian language theories and the decline of sensus communis.
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  34. Philosophy and Politeness, Moral Autonomy and Malleability in Shaftesbury's Characteristics.Joseph Chaves - 2008 - In Alexander John Dick & Christina Lupton (eds.), Theory and Practice in the Eighteenth Century: Writing Between Philosophy and Literature. Pickering & Chatto.
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  35. Earl Confiee.Richard Feldman - 2008 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Epistemology: An Anthology. Blackwell. pp. 310.
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  36. Lord Shaftesbury [Anthony Ashley Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury].Michael B. Gill - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Shaftesbury's philosophy combined a powerfully teleological approach, according to which all things are part of a harmonious cosmic order, with sharp observations of human nature (see section 2 below). Shaftesbury is often credited with originating the moral sense theory, although his own views of virtue are a mixture of rationalism and sentimentalism (section 3). While he argued that virtue leads to happiness (section 4), Shaftesbury was a fierce opponent of psychological and ethical egoism (section 5) and of the egoistic social (...)
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  37. Shaftesbury on the 'Natural Secretion' and Philosophical Personae.Laurent Jaffro - 2008 - Intellectual History Review 18 (3):349-359.
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  38. Shaftesbury: Emotionen Im Spiegel Reflexiver Neigung.Ursula Renz & Hilge Landweer - 2008 - In Ursula Renz & Hilge Landweer (eds.), Klassische Emotionstheorienclassical Emotion Theories. From Plato to Wittgenstein: Von Platon Bis Wittgenstein. Walter de Gruyter.
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  39. “A Rhetoric in Conduct”.M. Katherine Tillman - 2008 - Newman Studies Journal 5 (2):6-25.
    Newman’s explicit presentation of the ideal type, “the gentleman,” appears first and foremost in his Oratory papers of 1847 and 1848, and appears only secondarily, and then but partially, four and five years later in his Dublin Discourses of 1852. This essay traces lines of similarity and of difference between these successive portraits and distinguishes both from the attractive, better-known sketch Newman presents as Lord Shaftesbury’s, the “beau ideal” of the man of the world.
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  40. Anthony Ashley Cooper Shaftesbury, \"List o entuzjazmie. Moraliści\", przeł. A. Grzeliński, Wydawnictwo Naukowe UMK, Toruń 2007, ss. 189. [REVIEW]Patrycja Dudzik - 2007 - Filo-Sofija 7 (1(7)).
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  41. Moral Rationalism Vs. Moral Sentimentalism: Is Morality More Like Math or Beauty?Michael B. Gill - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (1):16–30.
    One of the most significant disputes in early modern philosophy was between the moral rationalists and the moral sentimentalists. The moral rationalists — such as Ralph Cudworth, Samuel Clarke and John Balguy — held that morality originated in reason alone. The moral sentimentalists — such as Anthony Ashley Cooper, the third Earl of Shaftesbury, Francis Hutcheson and David Hume — held that morality originated at least partly in sentiment. In addition to arguments, the rationalists and sentimentalists developed rich analogies. The (...)
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  42. Innerer Sinn Und Moralisches Gefühl: Zur Bedeutung Eines Begriffspaares Bei Shaftesbury Und Hutcheson Sowie in Kants Vorkritischen Schriften.Helke Panknin - 2007 - Georg Olms.
  43. List o Entuzjazmie.Anthony Ashley Cooper Shaftesbury - 2007 - Wydawn. Nauk. Uniwersytetu Mikołaja Kopernika.
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  44. Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson: Contesting Diversity in the Enlightenment and Beyond.Daniel Carey - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Are human beings linked by a common nature, one that makes them see the world in the same moral way? Or are they fragmented by different cultural practices and values? These fundamental questions of our existence were debated in the Enlightenment by Locke, Shaftesbury, and Hutcheson. Daniel Carey provides an important new historical perspective on their discussion. At the same time, he explores the relationship between these founding arguments and contemporary disputes over cultural diversity and multiculturalism. Our own conflicting positions (...)
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  45. The British Moralists on Human Nature and the Birth of Secular Ethics.Michael B. Gill - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Uncovering the historical roots of naturalistic, secular contemporary ethics, in this volume Michael Gill shows how the British moralists of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries completed a Copernican revolution in moral philosophy. They effected a shift from thinking of morality as independent of human nature to thinking of it as part of human nature itself. He also shows how the British Moralists - sometimes inadvertently, sometimes by design - disengaged ethical thinking, first from distinctly Christian ideas and then from theistic (...)
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  46. Hutcheson's Divergence From Shaftesbury.Simon Grote - 2006 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (2):159-172.
    Contrary to the view that Francis Hutcheson attempted to expound, defend, and further develop the philosophical system described in Shaftesbury's Characteristics, some contemporaries of Hutcheson considered Hutcheson's differences from Shaftesbury to be at least as profound as the similarities. The clearest descriptions of those differences can be found in William Leechman's preface to Hutcheson's 1755 System of Moral Philosophy, and more elaborately in a review of Hutcheson's System, probably by Hugh Blair, published in the 1755 Edinburgh Review. Examining Shaftesbury's and (...)
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  47. Two Approaches to Self-Love: Hutcheson and Butler.Christian Maurer - 2006 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2):81-96.
    This paper contrasts Frankfurt’s characterisation of self-love as disinterested with the predominant 18th-century view on self-love as interested. Ttwo senses of the term ‘interest’ are distinguished to discuss two fundamentally different readings of the claim that self-love promotes the agent’s interest. This allows characterising two approaches to self-love, which are found in Hutcheson’s and in Bbutler’s writings. Hutcheson sees self-love as a source of hedonistic motives, which can be calm or passionate. Bbutler sees it as a general affection of rational (...)
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  48. Shaftesbury E Hobbes.Emilio Sergio - 2005 - Rivista di Filosofia 96 (3):405-426.
  49. Locke, Shaftesbury, and Innateness.Daniel Carey - 2004 - Locke Studies 4:13-45.
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  50. The Metaphysics of Disinterestedness: The Chinese Gardening Style and Shaftesbury's New Aesthetics1.Yu Liu - 2004 - The European Legacy 9 (2):195-212.
    Scholars of Shaftesbury generally consider his notion of disinterestedness as the beginning of modern aesthetics while connecting it questionably with a view of modernity as defined in terms of the segregation of truth, beauty, and goodness. To read Shaftesbury differently, it is necessary to look into the textual circumstances of his key aesthetic ideas. In particular, it is important to recognize his implicit use of Sir William Temple's discussion of the Chinese garden immediately before the few justly famous passages about (...)
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