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  1. Ecofeminism: Toward Global Justice and Planetary Health.Greta Gaard & Lori Gruen - unknown - Society and Nature 2 (1):1-35.
  2. The power and the promise of ecofeminism, revisited.Karen Warren - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.
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  3. The Animals We Eat: Between Attention and Ironic Detachment.S. Caprioglio Panizza - 2022 - Journal of Animal Ethics 12 (1):32-50.
    This article engages with two fundamental attitudes toward animals who are used for human consumption: attention and ironic detachment. Taken as polarities linked with animal consumption and the refusal thereof, I discuss how these two attitudes are shaped and manifested during moments of encounter with the animals in question. Starting from a striking photograph from the Lychee and Dog Meat Festival in China, I explore the embodiment of these attitudes in the “gaze” of human participants during the encounter with animals (...)
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  4. Planetary activism at the end of the world: Feminist and posthumanist imaginaries beyond Man.Sanna Karkulehto, Aino-Kaisa Koistinen & Nóra Ugron - 2022 - European Journal of Women's Studies 29 (4):577-592.
    We are currently experiencing a planetary crisis that will lead, if worst comes to worst, to the end of the entire world as we know it. Several feminist scholars have suggested that if the Earth is to stay livable for humans and nonhumans alike, the ways in which many human beings – particularly in the wealthy parts of the world, infested with Eurocentrism, colonialism, neoliberalism, and capitalism – inhabit this planet requires radical, ethical, and political transformation. In this article, we (...)
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  5. Horizons of Difference: Rethinking Space, Place and Identity with Irigaray.Ruthanne Kim, Yvette Russell & Brenda Sharp - 2022 - Albany, NY, USA: The State University of New York Press.
    Horizons of Difference offers twelve original essays inspired by Luce Irigaray's complex, nuanced critique of Western philosophy, culture, and metaphysics, and her call to rethink our relationship to ourselves and the world through sexuate difference. Contributors engage urgent topics in a range of fields, including trans feminist theory, feminist legal theory, film studies, critical race theory, social-political theory, philosophy of religion, environmental ethics, philosophical aesthetics, and critical pedagogy. In so doing, they aim to push the scope of Irigaray's work beyond (...)
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  6. Daoist Ecofeminism as a New Democracy: An Analysis of Patriarchy in Contemporary China and a Tentative Solution.Jing Liu - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (2):276-292.
    The pain caused by the patriarchal totalitarianism of different modern political regimes is felt by everyone in our time: poverty, unemployment, high exploitation of both nature and humans, systematic oppression, persecution and domination, and pollution that threatens human existence. This article analyzes the different forms of patriarchy in contemporary China and explores a feminist way out. The first part examines how modern patriarchy unfolds itself through the land-enclosure movement that has caused serious pollution in China. I will show that the (...)
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  7. Horizons of Difference.Yvette Russell & Brenda Sharp - 2022 - Albany, NY, USA: The State University of New York.
    Horizons of Difference offers twelve original essays inspired by Luce Irigaray's complex, nuanced critique of Western philosophy, culture, and metaphysics, and her call to rethink our relationship to ourselves and the world through sexuate difference. Contributors engage urgent topics in a range of fields, including trans feminist theory, feminist legal theory, film studies, critical race theory, social-political theory, philosophy of religion, environmental ethics, philosophical aesthetics, and critical pedagogy. In so doing, they aim to push the scope of Irigaray's work beyond (...)
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  8. Ecofeminism in Film Adaptations of Lesia Ukrainka’s Forest Song.Anastassiya Andrianova - 2021 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 8:46-67.
    This article off ers a pioneering ecofeminist study of Viktor Ivchenko’s Lisova pisnia and Yurii Illienko’s Lisova pisnia. Mavka, two Soviet Ukrainian film adaptations of Lesia Ukrainka’s eponymous fairy-drama. It focuses on the interrelated depiction of gender and nature along with the drama’s ideological and material aspects: androcentrism and deforestation. The production of both fi lms coincides with, and arguably refl ects, what Marko Pavlyshyn describes as “the emergence of a conservationist consciousness” in the USSR in the 1960s. The article’s (...)
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  9. Environmental violence and postnatural oceans: Low trophic theory in the registers of feminist posthumanities.Cecilia Åsberg & Marietta Radomska - 2021 - In M. Husso, S. Karkulehto, T. Saresma, A. Laitila, J. Eilola & H. Siltala (eds.), Violence, Gender and Affect: Interpersonal, Institutional and Ideological Practices. London, UK: pp. 265-285.
    Environmental violence takes form of both ‘spectacular’ events, like ecological disasters usually recognised by the general public, and ‘slow violence’, a type of violence that occurs gradually, out of sight and on a long-term scale. Planetary seas and oceans, loaded with cultural meanings of that which ‘hides’ and ‘allows to forget’, are the spaces where such attritional violence unfolds unseen and ‘out of mind’. Simultaneously, conventional concepts of nature and culture, as dichotomous entities, become obsolete. We all inhabit and embody (...)
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  10. The Ability System and Decolonial Resistance: The Case of the Victorian Invalid.Rachel Cicoria - 2021 - Journal of World Philosophies 6 (2):45-60.
    Determinations of ability/disability are rooted in coloniality, specifically in categorizations of race, gender, and animality as they bear on social formations. I elucidate this rootedness by weaving the “coloniality of ability” into María Lugones’ accounts of the coloniality of gender and the colonial-modern system as founded on the “human-nonhuman” difference. This enables me to reveal an “ability system” based on the “ability-bestiality” difference and delineate with more specificity liminal sites of oppression and resistance across the heterogeneous socialities of coloniality-modernity. From (...)
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  11. Nancy Fraser, Iris Marion Young, and the Intersections of Justice: Equality, Recognition, Participation, and Third Wave Feminism.Gary Dorrien - 2021 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 42 (3):5-34.
    The call to struggle for social justice mobilizes progressive institutions, movements, and traditions that share nothing else. Progressives lacking any other ideological, religious, political, or cultural basis of commonality join together to make gains toward social justice, sometimes registering the historic limitations of this term by renaming it "eco-justice" or eco-social justice. The idea of social justice arose in the socialist and labor union movements of the mid-nineteenth century and was appropriated in Catholic and Protestant social teaching. Essentially it was (...)
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  12. Methodologies of Kelp: On Feminist Posthumanities, Transversal Knowledge Production and Multispecies Ethics in an Age of Entanglement.Cecilia Åsberg, Janna Holmstedt & Marietta Radomska - 2020 - In N. Cahoon H. Mehti (ed.), The Kelp Congress. Svolvær, Norway: pp. 11-23.
    We take kelp as material entities immersed in a multitude of relations with other creatures (for whom kelp serves as both nourishment and shelter) and inorganic elements of the milieu it resides in, on the one hand, and as a figuration: a material-semiotic “map of contestable worlds” that encompasses entangled threads of “knowledge, practice and power” (Haraway 1997, 11) in its local and global sense, on the other. While drawing on our field notes from the congress and feminist posthumanities and (...)
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  13. Sympathy for Cecil: gender, trophy hunting, and the western environmental imaginary.Eric S. Godoy - 2020 - Journal of Political Ecology 27 (1):759-774.
    This article draws from political ecology and ecofeminism to examine sympathy, expressed by record-breaking donations from North Americans, for the death of Cecil the Lion. The overlapping normative critique offered by these two perspectives together demonstrates how sympathy is disclosive of power relations. Sympathy reveals, relies upon, and reinforces different forms of gender, racial, and neocolonial domination; especially when western sympathy remains ignorant of the power relations, including their politics and histories, that shape attitudes toward non-human animals and grant them (...)
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  14. Caring for More Than Humans: Ecofeminism and Care Ethics in Conversation.Tove Pettersen - 2020 - In Odin Lysaker (ed.), Between Closeness and Evil. Oslo, Norge: pp. 183-213.
    Over the last four decades, both ecofeminism and care ethics have profoundly theorized the link between oppression and what is viewed as Others, such as women, non-human animals and nature. After uncovering and analyzing some important commonalities and differences between these two branches of feminist ethical theories and their critiques of dominant Western philosophy and ethics, Tove Pettersen also identifies some clear thematic and methodological overlaps with Arne Johan Vetlesen’s philosophy. She explores three topics in particular where ecofeminism and care (...)
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  15. Nature, Gender and Technology: The Ontological Foundations of Shiva’s Ecofeminist Philosophy.Gregory Morgan Swer - 2020 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 12 (2):1-14.
    This paper addresses the generally neglected topic of Vandana Shiva’s ontology. It is argued that there is a significant ontological component to Shiva’s ecofeminist philosophy and that this ontology underpins her ecological and feminist views. Shiva’s ontology provides a standpoint from which she can critique dichotomous ontologies of domination and oppression, and from which she can identify life-sustaining modes of existence. It is argued that this ontology is implicit in most of her works and is best grasped through the analysis (...)
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  16. Book Review: Jones, Clint. Ecological Reflections on Post-Capitalist Society (2018). [REVIEW]Tiffany Montoya - 2019 - The North Meridian Review 1.
  17. The Seeds of Violence: Ecofeminism, Technology, and Ecofeminist Philosophy of Technology.Gregory Morgan Swer - 2019 - In Janina Loh & Mark Coeckelbergh (ed.), Feminist Philosophy of Technology (Volume 2 - Techno:Phil - Aktuelle Herausforderungen der Technikphilosophie). Berlin: pp. 247-264.
    Ecofeminist philosophy is a development of feminist philosophy that addresses the intersection of sexism and environmental issues. Coined by Francoise d’Eaubonne, the term “ecofeminism” refers to a diverse collection of feminist thought that shares the conviction that the present environmental crisis is due not solely to the anthropomorphic nature of dominant conceptualisations of human-nature relations, with their emphasis on notion of mastery and control, but also to their androcentric nature. Ecofeminists hold that there is a strong connection between the oppression (...)
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  18. Ekofeminisme dalam Antroposen: Relevankah?: Kritik terhadap Gagasan Ekofeminisme.Ni Nyoman Oktaria Asmarani - 2018 - BALAIRUNG: Jurnal Multidisipliner Mahasiswa Indonesia 1 (1):126-143.
    Sikap kritis terhadap krisis ekologi yang berdampak buruk pada perempuan telah dimulai oleh Francoise d’Eaubonne dalam bukunya La Feminsme au la Mort (1974). Inilah awal terminologi ekofeminisme diperkenalkan. d’Eaubonne mengungkapkan adanya keterkaitan yang erat antara penindasan terhadap perempuan dan penindasan terhadap alam yang berakar pada kultur patriarki. Dalam sistem ini, perempuan menempati konstruksi posisi yang sama dengan alam yaitu sebagai objek, bukan subjek. Ekofeminisme kemudian lahir untuk memecahkan masalah kehidupan manusia dengan alam yang berangkat dari pengalaman perempuan dan menjadikannya sebagai (...)
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  19. From Cyborgs to Companion Species: Affinity and Solidarity in Donna Haraway’s Feminist Theory.Tomohiro Inokuchi - 2017 - In Applied Ethics: The Past, Present and Future of Applied Ethics. pp. 50-58.
    The purpose of this paper is to clarify the transition and its meaning of the central figure used by Donna J. Haraway. Along with her achievement in primatology and gender, her prior manifesto about cyborgs, in which she utilized the image of hybrids from science fiction as a tool for analyzing actual women, has received significant attention and has made her an essential researcher in feminist science studies. On the other hand, her recent concern has led her to publish another (...)
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  20. Eros After Nature.Chandler D. Rogers - 2016 - Soundings: An Interdisciplinary Journal 99 (3):223-245.
    On ground shared by environmental hermeneutics, critical social theory, and environmentally minded feminism, this article attempts to conciliate between the nearly antithetical ethical viewpoints of environmental philosophers David Abram and Steven Vogel. It will demonstrate first that Abram’s linguistic arguments for extending ethical considerability to nonhuman nature succumb to two of Vogel’s debilitating critiques, which it labels the social constructivist critique and the discourse ethics critique, and secondly that Abram fails to guard against the problem of human-human oppression. The article (...)
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  21. Gender Justice and Development: Vulnerability and Empowerment.Eric Palmer (ed.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    Vulnerability and empowerment are central concepts of contemporary development theory and ethics. Vulnerability associated with human interdependence is a wellspring of values in care ethics, while vulnerability arising from social problems demands remedy, of which empowerment is frequently the just form. Development planners and aid providers focus upon improving the wellbeing of the most vulnerable – especially women – by empowering them economically, socially and politically. -/- Both vulnerability and empowerment are considered in this volume. Jay Drydyk argues that empowerment (...)
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  22. ‘More Crucial’ Matters: Reclaiming ‘Sustainability’ and Transcending The Rhetoric of ‘Choice’ through Ecofeminist Pedagogy. Pilgrim & Davis - 2015 - Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):123-139.
    I would say very simply that the function of the intellectual is this: to put at the disposal of others, to put in common, this greater set of critical analytical tools, to make those tools freely available, and this naturally demands being rooted in reality that is in movement, a reality in which the researcher herself puts certain choices into practice, in which she can deem some matters to be more crucial than others. And the hope is, depending on the (...)
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  23. Nilai Ekofeminisme dalam Tumpek Wariga sebagai Kearifan Lokal Bali dalam Melestarikan Alam.Ni Nyoman Oktaria Asmarani - 2014 - Jurnal Filsafat 24 (1).
    Tumpek Wariga, yang juga disebut Tumpek Bubuh, Tumpek Uduh, atau Tumpek Pengatag adalah salah satu kearifan lokal berwujud perayaan keagamaan masyarakat Hindu Bali. Upacara ini dilakukan dalam rangka pemujaan Tuhan dalam manifestasinya sebagai Dewa Sangkara sebagai dewa tumbuh-tumbuhan dalam kepercayaan Hindu Bali. Walaupun dalam kebudayaan Bali perempuan dan laki-laki dianggap setara dalam upaya pelestarian alam, perempuan tetap mendapatkan tugas untuk mempersiapkan prosesi upacara agama, seperti Tumpek Wariga ini. Hal ini terjadi sebab perempuan dianggap memiliki karakteristik seperti alam, mereka memiliki kedekatan (...)
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  24. Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice.Regina Cochrane - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature wrought via (...)
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  25. Climate Change, Ethics, and Human Security. Edited by Karen O'Brien, Asunción Lera ST. Clair and Berit Kristoffersen. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2010. [REVIEW]Victoria Davion - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):707-712.
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  26. Climate Change Science and Responsible Trust: A Situated Approach.Heidi Grasswick - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):541-557.
    I adopt a situated approach to the question of what would constitute responsible trust and/or distrust in climate change science, and I identify some of the major challenges for laypersons in their attempts to know well by placing their trust in climate change experts. I examine evidence that white males, as a group of relative privilege, are more likely to distrust the institutions of climate change science than are other demographic groups, and use this example to consider specific challenges facing (...)
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  27. Nature Ethics: An Ecofeminist Perspective. By Marti Kheel. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2008.Lori Gruen - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):713-715.
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  28. Only Resist: Feminist Ecological Citizenship and the Post‐politics of Climate Change.Sherilyn MacGregor - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):617-633.
    European political theorists have argued that contemporary imaginaries of climate change are symptomatic of a post-political condition. My aim in this essay is to consider what this analysis might mean for a feminist green politics and how those who believe in such a project might respond. Whereas much of the gender-focused scholarship on climate change is concerned with questions of differentiated vulnerabilities and gendered divisions of responsibility and risk, I want to interrogate the strategic, epistemological, and normative implications for ecological (...)
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  29. Topographies of Flesh: Women, Nonhuman Animals, and the Embodiment of Connection and Difference.Jennifer McWeeny - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):269-286.
    Because of risks of essentialism and homogenization, feminist theorists frequently avoid making precise ontological claims, especially in regard to specifying bodily connections and differences among women. However well-intentioned, this trend may actually run counter to the spirit of intersectionality by shifting feminists' attention away from embodiment, fostering oppressor-centric theories, and obscuring privilege within feminism. What feminism needs is not to turn from ontological specificity altogether, but to engage a new kind of ontological project that can account for the material complexity (...)
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  30. Empowering Women: A Labor Rights-Based Approach: Case Studies from East African Horticultural Farms. [REVIEW]Bénédicte Brahic & Susie Jacobs - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):601-619.
    This article discusses the hitherto little-studied question of women workers’ empowerment through access to labor rights in the east African export horticultural sector. It is based on the work carried out by Women Working Worldwide and its east African partners, drawing on primary research on cut-flower farms in Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Uganda. The focus in discussions of women’s empowerment has tended to be on individual actors rather than collective strategies. We argue that strategies such as action research, education, organization and (...)
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  31. Locating Ecofeminism in Encounters with Food and Place.Chaone Mallory - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):171-189.
    This article explores the relationship between ecofeminism, food, and the philosophy of place. Using as example my own neighborhood in a racially integrated area of Philadelphia with a thriving local foods movement that nonetheless is nearly exclusively white and in which women are the invisible majority of purchasers, farmers, and preparers, the article examines what ecofeminism contributes to the discussion of racial, gendered, classed discrepancies regarding who does and does not participate in practices of locavorism and the local foods movement (...)
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  32. Domination and Consumption: an Examination of Veganism, Anarchism, and Ecofeminism.Ian Werkheiser - 2013 - Journal of Existential and Phenomenological Theory and Culture 8 (2):135-160.
    Anarchism provides a useful set of theoretical tools for understanding and resisting our culture’s treatment of non-human animals. However, some points of disagreement exist in anarchist discourse, such as the question of veganism. In this paper I will use the debate around veganism as a way of exploring the anarchist discourse on non-human animals, how that discourse can benefit more mainstream work on non-human animals, and how work coming out of mainstream environmental discourse, in particular the ecofeminist work of Val (...)
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  33. Thou Shall Not Harm All Living Beings: Feminism, Jainism, and Animals.Irina Aristarkhova - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):636-650.
    In this paper, I critically develop the Jain concept of nonharm as a feminist philosophical concept that calls for a change in our relation to living beings, specifically to animals. I build on the work of Josephine Donovan, Carol J. Adams, Jacques Derrida, Kelly Oliver, and Lori Gruen to argue for a change from an ethic of care and dialogue to an ethic of carefulness and nonpossession. I expand these discussions by considering the Jain philosophy of nonharm in relation to (...)
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  34. Ecofeminist Subjectivities: Chaucer's Talking Birds. [REVIEW]Isabel Davis - 2012 - The Medieval Review 4.
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  35. Sister species: Women, animals, and social justice. Edited by Lisa Kemmerer. Urbana, chicago, and springfield: University of illinois press, 2011. [REVIEW]Karen S. Emmerman - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):670-672.
  36. Marti Kheel Remembered (1948–2011).Lori Gruen - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):488-491.
  37. Invited symposium: Feminists encountering animals.Lori Gruen, Kari Weil, Kelly Oliver, Traci Warkentin, Stephanie Jenkins, Carrie Rohman, Emily Clark & Greta Gaard - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):492 - 526.
  38. Bitch, Bitch, Bitch: Personal Criticism, Feminist Theory, and Dog‐writing.Susan Mchugh - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):616-635.
    By the turn of the twenty-first century, women writing about electing to share their lives with female canines directly confront a strange sort of backlash. Even as their extensions of the feminist forms of personal criticism contribute to significant developments in theories of sex, gender, and species, they become targets of criticism as “indulgent” for focusing on their dogs. Comparing these elements in and around popular memoirs like Caroline Knapp's Pack of Two: The Intricate Bond between People and Dogs (1998) (...)
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  39. Planetary Love: Ecofeminist Perspectives on Globalization.Sam Mickey & Kimberly Carfore - 2012 - World Futures 68 (2):122 - 131.
    This article draws on three ecofeminist theorists (Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Val Plumwood, and Donna Haraway) in order to criticize the dominant model of globalization, which oppresses humans and the natural environment, and propose an alternative globalization grounded in planetary love. Rather than affirming or opposing the globalization, planetary love acknowledges its complicity with the neocolonial tendencies of globalization while aiming toward another globalization, a more just, peaceful, and sustainable globalization. In this context, love is characterized by non-coercive, mutually transformative contact, (...)
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  40. Ambivalence toward Animals and the Moral Community.Kelly Oliver - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  41. Disciplinary Becomings: Horizons of Knowledge in Animal Studies.Carrie Rohman - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  42. Species Trouble: Judith Butler, Mourning, and the Precarious Lives of Animals.James Stanescu - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):567-582.
    This article utilizes the work of Judith Butler in order to chart a queer and feminist animal studies, an animal studies that celebrates our shared embodied finitude. Butler's commentary on other animals remains dispersed and fragmented throughout books, lectures, and interviews over the course of the last several years. This work is critically synthesized in conjunction with her work on mourning and precarious lives. By developing an anti-anthropocentric understanding of mourning and precarious lives, this article hopes to create ontological, ethical, (...)
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  43. Must Every Animal Studies Scholar Be Vegan?Traci Warkentin - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):n/a-n/a.
  44. Sister Species: Women, Animals and Social Justice.Carol J. Adams - 2011 - University of Illinois Press.
    Sister Species: Women, Animals, and Social Justice addresses interconnections between speciesism, sexism, racism, and homophobia, clarifying why social justice activists in the twenty-first century must challenge intersecting forms of oppression. This anthology presents bold and gripping--sometimes horrifying--personal narratives from fourteen activists who have personally explored links of oppression between humans and animals, including such exploitative enterprises as cockfighting, factory farming, vivisection, and the bushmeat trade. Sister Species asks readers to rethink how they view "others," how they affect animals with their (...)
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  45. Frankenstein and Feminism: Contemplating The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein.Tanya Collings - 2011 - Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (1):66-68.
    Theodore Roszak's compelling parable, The Memoirs of Elizabeth Frankenstein, provides an (eco)-feminist view of the “Night of the Living Dead Model” and suggests that only the equal union of “masculine” and “feminine” energies will help us resolve the current eco-crisis. This article further explores the consequences of the highly masculinized post-Enlightenment rationalism as demonstrated in Roszak's novel. Although this article agrees that there is a dangerous imbalance between natural/spiritual and scientific/rational viewpoints, it also stresses that the extreme genderification of these (...)
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  46. Climate Change, Vulnerability, and Responsibility.Chris J. Cuomo - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):690-714.
    In this essay I present an overview of the problem of climate change, with attention to issues of interest to feminists, such as the differential responsibilities of nations and the disproportionate “vulnerabilities” of females, people of color, and the economically disadvantaged in relation to climate change. I agree with others that justice requires governments, corporations, and individuals to take full responsibility for histories of pollution, and for present and future greenhouse gas emissions. Nonetheless I worry that an overemphasis on household (...)
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  47. Women and Climate Change: A Case‐Study from Northeast Ghana.Trish Glazebrook - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):762-782.
    This paper argues that there is ethical and practical necessity for including women's needs, perspectives, and expertise in international climate change negotiations. I show that climate change contributes to women's hardships because of the conjunction of the feminization of poverty and environmental degradation caused by climate change. I then provide data I collected in Ghana to demonstrate effects of extreme weather events on women subsistence farmers and argue that women have knowledge to contribute to adaptation efforts. The final section surveys (...)
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  48. Fabbriche della vita. La critica ecofemminista alle tecniche riproduttive artificiali.Enrico Maestri - 2011 - Ragion Pratica: Rivista semestrale 37 (2):417-442.
    The technological control of female bodies and the bio-political control of artificial reproduction have become central issues within feminist philosophical thinking, becoming an obligatory point of reference toward deepening the conceptual, political, social and symbolic connection between women's bodies and assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs). In this essay, my attention will be focused primarily on eco-feminist theses that firmly oppose the diffusion of assisted reproductive technologies and the legitimization of «pregnancy contracts». According to the «resistance eco-feminists», (those against ARTs), the process (...)
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  49. Building Receptivity: Leopold's Land Ethic and Critical Feminist Interpretation.Kathryn J. Norlock - 2011 - Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture 5 (4):493-512.
    Aldo Leopold’s A Sand County Almanac emphasizes values of receptivity and perceptivity that appear to be mutually reinforcing, critical to an ecological conscience, and cultivatable through concrete and embodied experience. His priorities bear striking similarities to elements of the ethics of care elaborated by feminist philosophers, especially Nel Noddings, who notably recommended receptivity, direct and personal experience, and even shared Leopold’s attentiveness to joy and play as sources of moral motivation. These commonalities are so fundamental that ecofeminists can and should (...)
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  50. Distancias entre la ecología y la praxis ambiental: una lectura crítica desde el ecofeminismo.Paula Gabriela Núñez - 2011 - [San Carlos de Bariloche, Argentina?]: Universidad Nacional Río Negro, Sede Andina.
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