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  1. added 2018-08-02
    Rethinking Nudge: Not One But Three Concepts.Philippe Mongin & Mikael Cozic - 2018 - Behavioural Public Policy 2:107-124.
    Nudge is a concept of policy intervention that originates in Thaler and Sunstein's (2008) popular eponymous book. Following their own hints, we distinguish three properties of nudge interventions: they redirect individual choices by only slightly altering choice conditions (here nudge 1), they use rationality failures instrumentally (here nudge 2), and they alleviate the unfavourable effects of these failures (here nudge 3). We explore each property in semantic detail and show that no entailment relation holds between them. This calls into question (...)
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  2. added 2018-03-17
    An Evolutionary Psychology Model of Ego, Risk, and Cognitive Dissonance.Baruch Feldman - manuscript
    I propose a novel model of the human ego (which I define as the tendency to measure one’s value based on extrinsic success rather than intrinsic aptitude or ability). I further propose the conjecture that ego so defined both is a non-adaptive by-product of evolutionary pressures, and has some evolutionary value as an adaptation (protecting self-interest). I explore ramifications of this model, including how it mediates individuals’ reactions to perceived and actual limits of their power, their ability to cope with (...)
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  3. added 2017-11-22
    Introduction to the Special Issue of Economics and Philosophy on Neuroeconomics.Giacomo Bonanno, Christian List, Bertil Tungodden & Peter Vallentyne - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):301-302.
    ABSTRACT The past fifteen years or so have witnessed considerable progress in our understanding of how the human brain works. One of the objectives of the fast-growing field of neuroscience is to deepen our knowledge of how the brain perceives and interacts with the external world. Advances in this direction have been made possible by progress in brain imaging techniques and by clinical data obtained from patients with localized brain lesions. A relatively new field within neuroscience is neuroeconomics, which focuses (...)
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  4. added 2017-07-04
    Openness to Argument: A Philosophical Examination of Marxism and Freudianism.Ray Scott Percival - 1992 - Dissertation, London School of Economics
    No evangelistic erroneous network of ideas can guarantee the satisfaction of these two demands : (1) propagate the network without revision and (2) completely insulate itself against losses in credibility and adherents through criticism. If a network of ideas is false, or inconsistent or fails to solve its intended problem, or unfeasible, or is too costly in terms of necessarily forsaken goals, its acceptability may be undermined given only true assumptions and valid arguments. People prefer to adopt ideologies that (i) (...)
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  5. added 2017-03-06
    Is Economic Rationality in the Head?Kevin Vallier - 2015 - Minds and Machines 25 (4):339-360.
    Many economic theorists hold that social institutions can lead otherwise irrational agents to approximate the predictions of traditional rational choice theory. But there is little consensus on how institutions do so. I defend an economic internalist account of the institution-actor relationship by explaining economic rationality as a feature of individuals whose decision-making is aided by institutional structures. This approach, known as the subjective transaction costs theory, represents apparently irrational behavior as a rational response to high subjective transaction costs of thinking (...)
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  6. added 2017-02-12
    Setting the Scientistic Cat Among the Humanist Pigeons Don Ross. Economic Theory and Cognitive Science: Microexplanation.A. Gouws - 2010 - South African Journal of Philosophy 29 (1).
    This is a review article of Ross (2005), a book which attempts to show the implications of cognitive science and economics for each other. Ross makes neoclassical economics central to the unification of the behavioural sciences, and defends its fundamental health against its critics. He locates the source of the empirical and conceptual problems besetting neoclassical economics in the mistaken assumption that the economic agents neoclassicism talks about refer directly to real, whole people. Ross argues that people are atypical as (...)
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  7. added 2017-02-02
    Don Ross Economic Theory and Cognitive Science: Microexplanation.Keith Dowding - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):569-573.
  8. added 2017-01-27
    Neuroeconomics, Identity Theory, and the Issue of Correlation.Giuseppe Lo Dico - unknown
  9. added 2017-01-17
    Constitutive Explanations in Neuroeconomics: Principles and a Case Study on Money.Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (4):374-395.
    So far, the methodological debate about neuroeconomics rarely refers to original methodological positions in the neurosciences. I confront one of the most influential ones, the constitutive explanations or mechanism approach, with methodological claims that directly relate the economic model of choice with neuronal embodiments, represented by Glimcher’s influential work. Constitutive explanations are composite and non-reductionist, therefore allow for recognizing complex causal interactions between basal neuronal phenomena and cognitive structures, also involving external symbolic media. I demonstrate the power of this methodology (...)
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  10. added 2016-06-18
    The Metaphysics of Scarcity.Ray Scott Percival - 1996 - The Critical Rationalist 1 (2):1 - 31.
    Natural resources are infinite. This is possible because humans can create theories whose potential goes beyond the limited imaginative capacity of the inventor. For instance, no number of people can work out all the economic potential of quantum theory. Economic Resources are created by an interaction of Karl Popper's Worlds 1, 2 and 3, the worlds of physics, psychology and the abstract products of the human mind, such as scientific theories. Knowledge such as scientific theories has unfathomable information content, is (...)
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  11. added 2016-03-11
    For a Few Neurons More: Tractability and Neurally Informed Economic Modelling.Matteo Colombo - 2015 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (4):713-736.
    There continues to be significant confusion about the goals, scope, and nature of modelling practice in neuroeconomics. This article aims to dispel some such confusion by using one of the most recent critiques of neuroeconomic modelling as a foil. The article argues for two claims. First, currently, for at least some economic model of choice behaviour, the benefits derivable from neurally informing an economic model do not involve special tractability costs. Second, modelling in neuroeconomics is best understood within Marr’s three-level (...)
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  12. added 2015-12-10
    Five Theses on Neuroeconomics.Roberto Fumagalli - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (1):77-96.
    Over the last decade, neuroeconomic research has attracted increasing attention by economic modellers and methodologists. In this paper, I examine five issues about neuroeconomic modelling and methodology that have recently been subject to considerable controversy. For each issue, I explicate and appraise prominent neuroeconomists' findings, focusing on those that are claimed to directly inform economic theorizing. Moreover, I assess often-made assertions concerning how neuroeconomic research putatively advances the economic modelling of choice. In doing so, I combine review and critical arguments (...)
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  13. added 2015-10-05
    When, and How, Should Cognitive Bias Matter to Law.Govind Persad - 2014 - Law and Ineq 32:31.
    Recent work in the behavioral sciences asserts that we are subject to a variety of cognitive biases. For example, we mourn losses more than we prize equivalently sized gains; we are more inclined to believe something if it matches our previous beliefs; and we even relate more warmly or coldly to others depending on whether the coffee cup we are holding is warm or cold. Drawing on this work, case law and legal scholarship have asserted that we have reason to (...)
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  14. added 2015-09-10
    Introspection, Revealed Preference and Neoclassical Economics: A Critical Response to Don Ross on the Robbins-Samuelson Argument Pattern.D. Wade Hands - 2008 - Journal of the History of Economic Thought 30:1-26.
    Abstract: Don Ross’ Economic Theory and Cognitive Science (2005) provides an elaborate philosophical defense of neoclassical economics. He argues that the central features of neoclassical theory are associated with what he calls the Robbins-Samuelson argument pattern and that it can be reconciled with recent developments in experimental and behavioral economics, as well as contemporary cognitive science. This paper argues that Ross’ Robbins-Samuelson argument pattern is not in the work of either Robbins or Samuelson and in many ways is in conflict (...)
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  15. added 2015-09-10
    What Economics is Not: An Economist's Response to Rosenberg.Douglas W. Hands - 1984 - Philosophy of Science 51 (3):495-503.
    Alexander Rosenberg (1983) has argued, contrary to his previous work in the philosophy of economics, that economics is not science, and it is merely mathematics. The following paper argues that Rosenberg fails to demonstrate either of these two claims. The questions of the predictive weakness of modern economics and the cognitive standing of abstract economic theory are discussed in detail.
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  16. added 2015-07-28
    Radical Contingency in Sharing Behavior and its Consequences.Todd Davies - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):821-821.
    The data of Henrich et al., when combined with other research, suggest that sharing behavior probably varies systematically across cultures, situations, and individuals. Economic policies founded on recognition of this “radical contingency” would, I argue, nurture economic pluralism rather than attempting to bring the world under one system.
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  17. added 2015-05-22
    Entrepreneurship: Alertness, Judgment and Conjecture.Danny Frederick - manuscript
    I criticise, from a critical rationalist perspective, Israel Kirzner's notion of entrepreneurial alertness and Matthew McCaffrey's endorsement of Joseph Salerno's rival account of entrepreneurial judgment.
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  18. added 2015-03-21
    Reward, Emotion and Consumer Choice: From Neuroeconomics to Neurophilosophy.Gordon Robert Foxall - unknown
    Neuroeconomics has found no definitive role in the explanation of consumer choice and its undeveloped philosophical basis limits its attempt to explain economic behaviour. The nature of neuroeconomics is explored, especially with respect to what it reveals about the valuation of alternatives, choice and emotion. The tendency of human consumers to discount future rewards illustrates how behavioural and neuroscientific accounts of choice contribute to psychological explanations of choice and the issues this raises for both routine everyday choices and more extreme (...)
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  19. added 2014-09-25
    Human Behavior and Cognition in Evolutionary Economics.Richard R. Nelson - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):293-300.
    My brand of evolutionary economics recognizes, highlights, that modern economies are always in the process of changing, never fully at rest, with much of the energy coming from innovation. This perspective obviously draws a lot from Schumpeter. Continuing innovation, and the creative destruction that innovation engenders, is driving the system. There are winners and losers in the process, but generally the changes can be regarded as progress. The processes through which economic activity and performance evolve has a lot in common (...)
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  20. added 2014-09-25
    The Human Nature of the Economic Mind.Katherine Nelson - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (4):377-387.
    This paper provides a historical overview of cognitive psychology and computational theories in cognitive science. Critiques of the computational model are discussed. The perspective of the evolution of mind and brain provides an alternative model such as that presented by Merlin Donald in terms of the “Hybrid Mind.” This “naturalist” model is also consistent with what we know of cognitive development in childhood. It provides a better understanding of cognition in situated context than the computational alternatives and is a better (...)
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  21. added 2014-09-24
    Neuroeconomics: Hype or Hope?Caterina Marchionni & Jack Vromen - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):103-106.
    (2010). ‘Neuroeconomics: hype or hope?’. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 17, Neuroeconomics: Hype or Hope?, pp. 103-106. doi: 10.1080/13501781003756667.
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  22. added 2014-09-18
    Foundations of Neuroeconomic Analysis.Clement Levallois - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):81-84.
    Journal of Economic Methodology, Volume 19, Issue 1, Page 81-84, March 2012.
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  23. added 2014-09-18
    Friedman's Permanent Income Hypothesis as an Example of Diagnostic Reasoning.Maarten C. W. Janssen & Yao-Hua Tan - 1992 - Economics and Philosophy 8 (1):23.
    Many recent developments in artificial intelligence research are relevant for traditional issues in the philosophy of science. One of the developments in AI research we want to focus on in this article is diagnostic reasoning, which we consider to be of interest for the theory of explanation in general and for an understanding of explanatory arguments in economic science in particular. Usually, explanation is primarily discussed in terms of deductive inferences in classical logic. However, in recent AI research it is (...)
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  24. added 2014-09-16
    Økonomi Som En Videnskab Om Bevidstheden Og Interaktion.Michael Fast, Frederik Hertel & Woodrow Clark - unknown
    In understanding economics and the organisation of economics, the questions are what constituteeconomics and the thinking behind economics today? In short what is the field of economics? And in what ways can we connect to and understand this field of study? Of course, the answer to this depends upon the perspective chosen, in which one sees and thinks of economics from a particular philosophical and even political position and perspective. If one takes the perspective on economics from a qualitative paradigm (...)
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  25. added 2014-09-16
    Metaphysics of Money: A Special Case of Emerging Autonomy in Evolving Subsystems.Robert B. Glassman - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):186-187.
    There is “something more” to money, as this incisive review shows. The target article's shortcoming is its overextension of the “drug” metaphor as a blend of features that do not fit the rationalistic economics and behavioral psychologies summarized as tool theories, but this may be resolved by viewing money as a particular case of the more general evolutionary phenomenon of emergent subsystem autonomy. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  26. added 2014-09-15
    On the Surprising Finding That Expected Utility is Literally Computed in the Brain.Jack Vromen - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (1):17-36.
    Advocates of neuroeconomics sometimes argue that one of the most surprising findings in neuroeconomic studies is that expected utilities are literally computed in the brain. This claim is scrutinized closely in the paper. Not surprisingly, the tenability of the claim is shown to depend critically on what is meant by ?literal computation? and ?surprising?. It is argued that the findings do not show that expected utilities are literally computed, if by ?literal computation? we mean a particular kind of mental activity (...)
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  27. added 2014-09-15
    Where Economics and Neuroscience Might Meet.Jack Vromen - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):171-183.
    Contrary to what is claimed by Gul and Pesendorfer (2008), in this paper I argue that neuroscience and economics can meet in ways that speak to the interests of economists. As Bernheim (2009) argues, economists seem to be primarily interested in novel models that link ?traditional? environmental variables (such as prices and taxes) to choice behavior in a more accurate way than existing models. Neuroscience might be helpful here, since especially computational neuroscience is also in the business of mapping environmental (...)
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  28. added 2014-09-15
    Against Simplicity and Cognitive Individualism.Nathaniel T. Wilcox - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):523-532.
    Neuroeconomics illustrates our deepening descent into the details of individual cognition. This descent is guided by the implicit assumption that is the important of neoclassical economics. I argue here that this assumption is neither obviously correct, nor of primary importance to human economies. In particular I suggest that the main genius of the human species lies with its ability to distribute cognition across individuals, and to incrementally accumulate physical and social cognitive artifacts that largely obviate the innate biological limitations of (...)
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  29. added 2014-09-15
    Comments on the Potential Significance of Neuroeconomics for Economic Theory.Ran Spiegler - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):515-521.
    In this short note I speculate about the various ways in which the study of neurological aspects of decision making could be fruitful for economic modelling.
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  30. added 2014-09-15
    Experiments as Exhibits and Experiments as Tests.Robert Sugden - 2005 - Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):291-302.
    Two roles of experiments in behavioural economics are distinguished ? experiments as exhibits and experiments as tests of theories. An exhibit is an experimental design which reliably induces a surprising regularity, typically combined with an informal hypothesis about the underlying causal mechanism. ?Deviation theories? ? generalisations of received theories which incorporate additional causal mechanisms ? are constructed so as to be consistent with known exhibits, and tested in new situations. The paper argues that the principles of good practice are different (...)
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  31. added 2014-09-15
    Intentionality and Economics.Allin Cottrell - 1995 - Economics and Philosophy 11 (1):159.
    In his recent book, Economics – Mathematical Politics or Science of Diminishing Returns, Alexander Rosenberg has offered a forceful critique of the scientific pretensions of economics. I am encouraged to note that in his JEL review, Wade Hands singles out Rosenberg's ‘important discussion of intentionality’ as one of the most significant aspects of the book. Encouraged, because this was exactly my impression, and Hands's judgment confirmed my intention to respond to Rosenberg's argument. I hope, however, to be able to disappoint (...)
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  32. added 2014-09-13
    Altruism as a Thick Concept.Michael Schefczyk & Mark Peacock - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):165-187.
    In this paper, we examine different forms of altruism. We commence by analysing the definition and, after clarifying its conditions for altruism, we argue that it is not in with everyday linguistic usage of the term. We therefore consider a definition, which we likewise refine, and argue that it better reflects ordinary language use. Both behavioural and psychological approaches define altruism descriptively and thus fail to capture an important aspect of altruism, namely its normative component. Altruism, we argue, is a, (...)
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  33. added 2014-09-12
    Estranged Parents and a Schizophrenic Child: Choice in Economics, Psychology and Neuroeconomics.Don Ross - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):217-231.
    Gul and Pesendorfer provide the best-known and most strident of a set of recent backlashes by economists against methodological revolutions promoted by some behavioural economists and neuroeconomists. Philosophers are likely to read these responses as merely reactionary, especially as their rhetoric goes beyond what their explicit argumentation validly supports. The present paper identifies the accurate insight on Gul and Pesendorfer's part that explains the impact of their philosophically ragged polemic. This centers on importantly different concepts of choice in the psychological (...)
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  34. added 2014-09-12
    Comments on Neuroeconomics.Ariel Rubinstein - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):485-494.
    Neuroeconomics is examined critically using data on the response times of subjects who were asked to express their preferences in the context of the Allais Paradox. Different patterns of choice are found among the fast and slow responders. This suggests that we try to identify types of economic agents by the time they take to make their choices. Nevertheless, it is argued that it is far from clear if and how neuroeconomics will change economics.
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  35. added 2014-09-12
    Two Styles of Neuroeconomics.Don Ross - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):473-483.
    I distinguish between two styles of research that are both called . Neurocellular economics (NE) uses the modelling techniques and mathematics of economics to model relatively encapsulated functional parts of brains. This approach rests upon the fact that brains are, like markets, massively distributed information-processing networks over which executive systems can exert only limited and imperfect governance. Harrison's (2008) deepest criticisms of neuroeconomics do not apply to NE. However, the more famous style of neuroeconomics is behavioural economics in the scanner. (...)
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  36. added 2014-09-11
    From Cognitive Science to Cognitive Neuroscience to Neuroeconomics.Steven R. Quartz - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):459-471.
    As an emerging discipline, neuroeconomics faces considerable methodological and practical challenges. In this paper, I suggest that these challenges can be understood by exploring the similarities and dissimilarities between the emergence of neuroeconomics and the emergence of cognitive and computational neuroscience two decades ago. From these parallels, I suggest the major challenge facing theory formation in the neural and behavioural sciences is that of being under-constrained by data, making a detailed understanding of physical implementation necessary for theory construction in neuroeconomics. (...)
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  37. added 2014-09-09
    Neuroeconomics and the Economic Sciences.Kevin A. McCabe - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):345-368.
    Neuroeconomics is the newest of the economic sciences with a focus on how the embodied human brain interacts with its institutional and social environment to make economic decisions. This paper presents an overview of neuroeconomics methods and reviews a number of results in this emerging field of study.
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  38. added 2014-09-09
    The Affective Neuroeconomics of Social Brains: One Man's Cruelty is Another's Suffering.Jaak Panksepp - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):234-235.
    Cruelty does not emerge from a single emotional system of the brain. Its many cognitive aspects are intermeshed inextricably with the nature of negative affects ranging from fear to suffering. The rewards of cruelty may be counteracted by a variety of neurochemical factors as well as novel social policies.
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  39. added 2014-08-16
    Why Economics is Not a Science of Behaviour.Marek Hudík - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):147-162.
    The paper criticises psychologism, i.e. the idea that economics is a science of behaviour or that it must be rooted in such a science. The argument is based on Hayek and Popper's thesis that economics studies spontaneous order. First, it is argued that if economics is to retain its traditional distance from psychology, it has to abandon the notion that it is concerned with behaviour. Then it is shown that there is no simple one-way causation from the psychological to the (...)
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  40. added 2014-08-13
    Is Neuroeconomics Doomed by the Reverse Inference Fallacy?Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde - 2010 - Mind and Society 9 (2):229-249.
    Neuroeconomic studies are liable to fall into the reverse inference fallacy, a form of affirmation of the consequent. More generally neuroeconomics relies on two problematic steps, namely the inference from brain activities to the engagement of cognitive processes in experimental tasks, and the presupposition that such inferred cognitive processes are relevant to economic theorizing. The first step only constitutes the reverse inference fallacy proper and ways to correct it include a better sense of the neural response selectivity of the targeted (...)
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  41. added 2014-08-13
    The Use of Intentional Language in Scientific Articles in Finance.Gisèle Chevalier & Richard Hudson - 2001 - Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (2):203-228.
    Rosenberg claims that economics must use the 'intentional idiom' for its explanatory strategies. We examine whether scientific articles in financial economics do in fact ascribe propositional attitudes to economic agents. We look at articles in the Journal of Finance , volume 54 (1999), where we find a total of 250 502 words in 29 articles. The total number of ascriptions of the intentional states of belief, desire, expectation or preference to economic agents is 137, with 26 of 29 articles making (...)
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  42. added 2014-07-15
    Mechanika życia społecznego. Metodologiczne podstawy Davida Hume’a teorii pieniądza.Kawalec Pawel - 2011 - Przeglad Filozoficzny - Nowa Seria 80 (4):437-448.
    C. Howson’s probabilistic logic as a comprehensive methodological account of scientific inference, which avoids Hume’s inductive skepticism, is discussed against the background of the latter’s quantitative theory of money. Hume’s theory leads to two causal accounts that may appear to be contradictory. As the more general one suggests neutrality of money, while the more descriptive attributes causal influence to specie-flow mechanism of money. The former is grounded by a counterfactual reasoning. The discussion of recent examples of bayesian counterfactual models leads (...)
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  43. added 2014-05-20
    The Social Motivation Hypothesis for Prosocial Behavior.M. Nagatsu, M. Salmela & Marion Godman - 2014 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (5):563-587.
    Existing economic models of prosociality have been rather silent in terms of proximate psychological mechanisms. We nevertheless identify the psychologically most informed accounts and offer a critical discussion of their hypotheses for the proximate psychological explanations. Based on convergent evidence from several fields of research, we argue that there nevertheless is a more plausible alternative proximate account available: the social motivation hypothesis. The hypothesis represents a more basic explanation of the appeal of prosocial behavior, which is in terms of anticipated (...)
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  44. added 2014-03-31
    Now You See It, Now You Don't: Emerging Contrary Results in Economics.Robert S. Goldfarb - 1997 - Journal of Economic Methodology 4 (2):221-244.
    Abstract A number of empirical literatures in economics display the following pattern of results. First, evidence accumulates to support an empirical result. As time passes, however, contrary results emerge that challenge that initial result. This phenomenon raises important issues about (i) what part empirical findings play in how economists come to believe things; and (ii) how believable inferences are to be made from literatures displaying such contrary results. This paper documents this ?emerging contrary result? phenomenon, and investigates the factors causing (...)
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  45. added 2014-03-29
    Introduction.Claire Brossaud & Bernard Reber - 2010 - In Bernard Reber & Claire Brossaud (eds.), Archives de Philosophie du Droit. Wiley. pp. 274-285.
  46. added 2014-03-29
    Explaining Culture: A Naturalistic Approach, Dan Sperber. Blackwell Publishers, 1996, Vii + 175 Pages. [REVIEW]William Harms - 1998 - Economics and Philosophy 14 (1):177.
  47. added 2014-03-28
    The Dynamics of Norms, Christina Bicchieri, Richard Jeffrey, and Brain Skyrms . Cambridge University Press, 1997, 222 + X Pages. [REVIEW]Sven Ove Hansson - 1999 - Economics and Philosophy 15 (2):307.
  48. added 2014-03-24
    The Human Agent in Behavioural Finance: A Searlean Perspective.Philip Faulkner - 2002 - Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):31-52.
    According to John Searle's theory of human ontology, intentional mental states such as beliefs and wants rely on non-intentional, Background, dispositions to produce rational behaviour. The distinction between intentional and non-intentional states is used as the basis on which to understand the various conceptions of human agency to be found in behavioural finance. The agent of behavioural finance is characterized in terms of three sets of psychological traits: prospect theory, heuristics and mental accounting. These are examined from a Searlean perspective (...)
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  49. added 2014-03-21
    Framing as Path Dependence.Natalie Gold & Christian List - 2004 - Economics and Philosophy 20 (2):253-277.
    A framing effect occurs when an agent's choices are not invariant under changes in the way a decision problem is presented, e.g. changes in the way options are described (violation of description invariance) or preferences are elicited (violation of procedure invariance). Here we identify those rationality violations that underlie framing effects. We attribute to the agent a sequential decision process in which a “target” proposition and several “background” propositions are considered. We suggest that the agent exhibits a framing effect if (...)
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  50. added 2014-03-19
    Are Interpersonal Comparisons of Utility Indeterminate?Christian List - 2003 - Erkenntnis 58 (2):229 - 260.
    On the orthodox view in economics, interpersonal comparisons of utility are not empirically meaningful, and "hence" impossible. To reassess this view, this paper draws on the parallels between the problem of interpersonal comparisons of utility and the problem of translation of linguistic meaning, as explored by Quine. I discuss several cases of what the empirical evidence for interpersonal comparisonsof utility might be and show that, even on the strongest of these, interpersonal comparisons are empirically underdetermined and, if we also deny (...)
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