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  1. Tom Furniss, Edmund Burke's Aesthetic Ideology.A. Arblaster - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
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  2. Two Concepts of Liberalism: Creation, Voluntarism and Politics in the Thought of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Burke.Christopher Insole - forthcoming - Modern Theology.
  3. Edmund Burke on Political Theory and Practice.Howard B. White - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  4. Burkean Beauty in the Service of Violence.C. E. Emmer - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (3):55-64.
    Examining the images of war displayed on front pages of the New York Times, David Shields makes the case that they ultimately glamorize military conflict. He anchors his case with an excerpt on the delight of the sublime from Edmund Burke’s aesthetic theory in A Philosophical Enquiry. By contrast, this essay considers violence and warfare using not the Burkean sublime, but instead the beautiful in Burke’s aesthetics, and argues that forming identities on the beautiful in the Burkean sense can ultimately (...)
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  5. Edmund Burke, the Imperatives of Empire and the American Revolution.H. G. Callaway - 2016 - Cambridge Scholar's Publishing.
    Book Description -/- Edmund Burke (1730-1797) was a friend and advocate of America during the political crisis of the 1760s and the 1770s, and he spoke out eloquently and forcefully in defense of the rights of the colonial subjects of the British empire—in America, Ireland and India alike. However, he is often best remembered for his extremely critical Reflections on the Revolution in France. The present volume is based on classic Burke, including his most famous writings and speeches on the (...)
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  6. Chesterton for and Against Burke.John Coates - 2015 - The Chesterton Review 41 (1/2):75-103.
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  7. Burke and Clausewitz on the Limitation of War.J. Furman Daniel & Brian A. Smith - 2015 - Journal of International Political Theory 11 (3):313-330.
    Restraining the violence of war is difficult under the best of circumstances. In their observations on the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, Edmund Burke and Carl von Clausewitz consider the peculiar violence of wars fought for abstract and world-transformative goals. While the beliefs that animated those wars have faded, in this essay we argue that Burke and Clausewitz offer insight into the ways that modern political violence becomes unmoored from limitation and restraint and that their arguments show a surprising unity (...)
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  8. Seduced by System: Edmund Burke's Aesthetic Embrace of Adam Smith's Philosophy.Michael L. Frazer - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (3):357-372.
  9. Burke’s Pentad as a Guide for Symbol-Using Citizens.Clarke Rountree & John Rountree - 2015 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (4):349-362.
    Ever since the rhetorical turn in education, education scholars have recognized the importance of rhetoric in constructing and mediating human society. They have turned to rhetorical theory to come to terms with this rhetorically mediated reality and to engage students as critical citizens within it. Much of this work draws on rhetorical theorist Kenneth Burke, but much of Burke’s work remains unexplored in this area. We argue that his theories can be part of a user’s guide to educate students about (...)
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  10. Edmund Burke's Ideas on Historical Change.Sora Sato - 2014 - History of European Ideas 40 (5):675-692.
    Burke's view of history is an aspect of his thought that has been largely neglected by scholars, despite the wide recognition of its importance. In Burke's view, history, led by providence and by a human nature designed by God, is necessarily progressive. It is, nevertheless, human beings who are largely responsible for building their nations. A variety of civilisations could be generated if people governed a nation in harmony with its peculiar manners and circumstances. Nations can, however, be unstable, because (...)
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  11. Burke, Reissue.C. B. Macpherson - 2013 - Oxford University Press Canada.
    In this concise yet powerful book, one of the twentieth century's most respected political philosophers presents a controversial reassessment of the political ideas and intellectual legacy of Edmund Burke. A practicing politician and powerful writer, full of ideas, Burke was intent on getting those ideas translated into government policies. But he was too much the impatient practitioner to set out his principles in a single book in the manner of Locke or Hume, leaving both admirers and opponents ample scope to (...)
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  12. The Science of Sensibility: Reading Burke's Philosophical Enquiry Ed. By Koen Vermeir, Michael Funk Deckard (Review).Iain Hampsher-Monk - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (4):684-685.
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  13. Burke, Reissue.C. B. Macpherson & Frank Cunningham - 2013 - Oup Canada.
    One of the twentieth century's most respected political philosophers presents a controversial perspective on the political ideas and intellectual legacy of Edmund Burke. This new edition includes an introduction by Frank Cunningham, placing the book in the broader context of Macpherson's work.
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  14. Edmund Burke.Thierry Baudet & Michiel Visser - 2012 - In Thierry Baudet & Michiel Visser (eds.), Revolutionair Verval En de Conservatieve Vooruitgang in de Achttiende En Negentiende Eeuw. Bakker.
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  15. Religion and the Sublime.Andrew Chignell & Matthew C. Halteman - 2012 - In Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.), The Sublime: From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    An effort to lay out a kind of taxomony of conceptual relations between the domains of the sublime and the religious. Warning: includes two somewhat graphic images. -/- .
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  16. The Science of Sensibility: Reading Burke's Philosophical Enquiry.Peter Jones - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (6):1215-1217.
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  17. The Burke-Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy.Daniel I. O'Neill - 2012 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Many modern conservatives and feminists trace the roots of their ideologies, respectively, to Edmund Burke and Mary Wollstonecraft, and a proper understanding of these two thinkers is therefore important as a framework for political debates today. According to Daniel O’Neill, Burke is misconstrued if viewed as mainly providing a warning about the dangers of attempting to turn utopian visions into political reality, while Wollstonecraft is far more than just a proponent of extending the public sphere rights of man to include (...)
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  18. Beauty, Disinterested Pleasure, and Universal Communicability: Kant’s Response to Burke.Bart Vandenabeele - 2012 - Kant-Studien 103 (2):207-233.
    : Although Kant holds that the universal communicability of aesthetic judgments logically follows from the disinterested character of the pleasure upon which they are based, Kant’s emphasis on the a priori validity of judgments of beauty can be viewed as a rebuttal of the kind of empiricist arguments that Burke offers to justify the social nature of the experience of beauty. I argue that the requirement of universal communicability is not a mere addition to the requirement of universal validity and (...)
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  19. The Science of Sensibility. Reading Edmund Burke's Philosophical Enquiry.Koen Vermeir & Michael Deckard (eds.) - 2012 - Dordrecht: Springer.
    Attracting philosophers, politicians, artists as well as the educated reader, Edmund Burke’s Philosophical Enquiry, first published in 1757, was a milestone in western thinking. This edited volume will take the 250th anniversary of the Philosophical Enquiry as an occasion to reassess Burke’s prominence in the history of ideas. Situated on the threshold between early modern philosophy and the Enlightenment, Burke’s oeuvre combines reflections on aesthetics, politics and the sciences. This collection is the first book length work devoted primarily to Burke’s (...)
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  20. Edmund Burke for Our Time: Moral Imagination, Meaning, and Politics.William F. Byrne - 2011 - Northern Illinois University Press.
    This highly readable book offers a contemporary interpretation of the political thought of Edmund Burke, drawing on his experiences to illuminate and address fundamental questions of politics and society that are of particular interest today. For Burke, one’s imaginative context provides meaning and is central to judgment and behavior. Many of Burke’s ideas can be brought together around his concept of the “moral imagination,” which has received little systematic treatment in the context of Burke’s own experience. In _Edmund Burke for (...)
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  21. Edmund Burke and the Emotions.David Dwan - 2011 - Journal of the History of Ideas 72 (4):571-593.
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  22. Edmund Burke.Frank O'Gorman - 2011 - Routledge.
    First published in 1973, this title offers a concise and readable account of Burke's political philosophy. As well as examining the foundation for Burke's thought, the book also provides much needed connections between the fields of history and political theory. Critical comment and analysis of Burke's attitudes to the problems of the second half of the eighteenth century are also included.
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  23. The Moral Basis of Burke's Political Thought: An Essay.Charles Parkin - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    First published in 1956, this volume constitutes an attempt to identify the moral basis of Burke's political thought. Given Burke's stated belief that contingent political systems are held together by an essential basis in moral principles, this can be seen as a problem of fundamental importance in gaining an understanding of his theories. The obvious difficulty of such an exposition consists in attempting to create common ground between abstract concepts and the mutability of the empirically observed world. The author meets (...)
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  24. Edmund Burke.Dennis O'Keeffe - 2010 - Continuum.
    Major Conservative and Libertarian Thinkers provides comprehensive accounts of the works.
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  25. Review Article: Edmund Burke and the Importance of Context.Ben J. Taylor - 2010 - European Journal of Political Theory 9 (3):357-366.
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  26. Burke.David Boucher - 2009 - In David Boucher & Paul Kelly (eds.), Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present. Oxford University Press.
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  27. The Burke–Wollstonecraft Debate: Savagery, Civilization, and Democracy.Carolyn Burdett - 2009 - Intellectual History Review 19 (1):153-154.
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  28. Reflections on the Revolution in France.Edmund Burke - 2009 - London: Oxford University Press.
    This new and up-to-date edition of a book that has been central to political philosophy, history, and revolutionary thought for two hundred years offers readers a dire warning of the consequences that follow the mismanagement of change. Written for a generation presented with challenges of terrible proportions--the Industrial, American, and French Revolutions, to name the most obvious--Burke's Reflections of the Revolution in France displays an acute awareness of how high political stakes can be, as well as a keen ability to (...)
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  29. Edmund Burke and Empire.Iain Hampsher-Monk - 2009 - In Duncan Kelly (ed.), Lineages of Empire: The Historical Roots of British Imperial Thought. pp. 117.
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  30. Rethiking Burke and India.Daniel O'Neill - 2009 - History of Political Thought 30 (3):492-523.
    The question of how to think about the relationship between political theory and empire has recently emerged as an important topic in the history of political thought. In this regard, Edmund Burke, often regarded as the founding father of modern conservatism, has been depicted by a number of contemporary scholars as a staunch anti-imperialist and a strong defender of cultural pluralism and difference. In the present article, I argue against this view in two ways. First, I contend that Burke was (...)
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  31. Edmund Burke.Ian Harris - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  32. Two Conceptions of Liberalism: Theology, Creation, and Politics in the Thought of Immanuel Kant and Edmund Burke.Christopher J. Insole - 2008 - Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (3):447-489.
    Constitutional liberal practices are capable of being normatively grounded by a number of different metaphysical positions. Kant provides one such grounding, in terms of the autonomously derived moral law. I argue that the work of Edmund Burke provides a resource for an alternative construal of constitutional liberalism, compatible with, and illumined by, a broadly Thomistic natural law worldview. I contrast Burke's treatment of the relationship between truth and cognition, prudence and rights, with that of his contemporary, Kant. We find that (...)
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  33. Reading History in a Revolutionary Age: Strategies for Interpreting 1688 in Richard Price, James Mackintosh, and Edmund Burke.Morgan Rooney - 2008 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 27:27.
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  34. The Contractility of Burke's Sublime and Heterodoxies in Medicine and Art.Aris Sarafianos - 2008 - Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (1):23-48.
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  35. Edmund Burke and the Politics of Conquest.Richard Bourke - 2007 - Modern Intellectual History 4 (3):403-432.
  36. Burke and Kant on Fear of God and the Sublime.Michael Funk Deckard - 2007 - Bijdragen 68 (1):3-25.
    In the Critique of the Power of Judgment , Kant mentions transcendental and physiological judgments in their relationship to the sublime. He further mentions that for the best physiological treatment, one must look to Edmund Burke’s A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful . Whereas for Burke, the feeling of the sublime “is based on the impulse toward self-preservation and on fear,” for Kant it is the mind that “is not merely attracted by (...)
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  37. The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch.C. E. Emmer - 2007 - International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows for (...)
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  38. Burke's Higher Romanticism: Politics and the Sublime.William F. Byrne - 2006 - Humanitas 19 (1):14-34.
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  39. Edmund Burke and the Anglo-American Tradition of Liberty.João Carlos Espada - 2006 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 58:213-.
    It is proper for more reasons than the most obvious one that I should open this talk by quoting a former President of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, Lord Quinton, whose works on political philosophy I have so much enjoyed—and learnt from.
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  40. Edmund Burke and the Anglo-American Tradition of Liberty.João Carlos Espada - 2006 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 58:213-230.
    It is proper for more reasons than the most obvious one that I should open this talk by quoting a former President of the Royal Institute of Philosophy, Lord Quinton, whose works on political philosophy I have so much enjoyed—and learnt from.
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  41. Ordine E Libertà: L'Autorità Del Tempo in Edmund Burke.Enrico Graziani - 2006 - Aracne.
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  42. Qu'est-ce qu'un jugement esthétique? Chs1,2 online.John Zeimbekis - 2006 - Vrin.
    Among the book's arguments: Aesthetic property relativism, as described by Alan Goldman, requires subjects to make judgments based on prima facie preferences for determinable properties (eg being curved, being blue). These judgments are not bona fide because they do not require acquaintance with objects. Value concepts and aesthetic (thick) concepts relate contingently. We can be aesthetic property realists, or quasi-realists, without being aesthetic value realists. Contains epistemological arguments against neuro-aesthetics (Ramachandran), aesthetic sense theory (Hutcheson), physiological theories (Burke), and Hume's realism.
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  43. An Imaginative Whig: Reassessing the Life and Thought of Edmund Burke.Ian Crowe (ed.) - 2005 - University of Missouri.
    This collection of essays shifts the focus of scholarly debate away from the themes that have traditionally dominated the study of Edmund Burke. In the past, largely ideology-based or highly textual studies have tended to paint Burke as a “prophet” or “precursor” of movements as diverse as conservatism, political pragmatism, and romanticism. In contrast, these essays address prominent issues in contemporary society—multiculturalism, the impact of postmodern and relativist methodologies, the boundaries of state-church relationships, and religious tolerance in modern societies—by emphasizing (...)
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  44. Baumgarten und Burke: Rationalismus und Empirismus.P. Giordanetti - 2005 - In Hans-Jörg Sandkühler (ed.), Handbuch Deutscher Idealismus. J.B. Metzler. pp. 297--297.
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  45. Edmund Burke. L'infinità Sublime.P. Giordanetti - 2005 - In Piero Giordanetti (ed.), I Luoghi Del Sublime Moderno. Led. pp. 168--171.
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  46. Moses Mendelssohn: L'Inquiry di Burke.P. Giordanetti - 2005 - In Piero Giordanetti (ed.), I Luoghi Del Sublime Moderno. Led. pp. 50--62.
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  47. Edmund Burke: Arte e passioni.Piero Emilio Giordanetti - 2005 - In Piero Giordanetti (ed.), I Luoghi Del Sublime Moderno. Led.
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  48. The New History: Confessions and Conversations. By Maria Lucia G. Pallares-Burke.M. Mastrogregori - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (5):533.
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  49. Somaesthetics and Burke's Sublime.Richard Shusterman - 2005 - British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):323-341.
    Burke is an important exception to Nietzsche's claim that philosophical aesthetics ignores physiology and the role of practical interest. Grounded on the powerful interest of survival, Burke's theory of the sublime also offers a physiological explanation of our feelings of sublimity that explicitly defines certain conditions of our nerves as the ‘efficient cause’ of such feelings. While his general account of sublimity is widely appreciated, its somatic dimension has been dismissed as hopelessly misguided. In examining Burke's views in relation to (...)
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  50. Imitation and Society: The Persistence of Mimesis in the Aesthetics of Burke, Hogarth and Kant.Tom Huhn - 2004 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This book reconsiders the fate of the doctrine of mimesis in the eighteenth century. Standard accounts of the aesthetic theories of this era hold that the idea of mimesis was supplanted by the far more robust and compelling doctrines of taste and aesthetic judgment. Since the idea of mimesis was taken to apply only in the relation of art to nature, it was judged to be too limited when the focus of aesthetics changed to questions about the constitution of individual (...)
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