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  1. Heidegger Against Embodied Cognition.Joshua Soffer - manuscript
    Current approaches in psychology have replaced the idea of a centralized, self-present identity with that of a diffuse system of contextually changing states distributed ecologically as psychologically embodied and socially embedded. However, the failure of contemporary perspectives to banish the lingering notion of a literal, if fleeting, status residing within the parts of a psycho-bio-social organization may result in the covering over of a rich, profoundly intricate process of change within the assumed frozen space of each part. In this paper (...)
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  2. Addressing the Unspoken Nature of Trauma: Utilizing Somatic Processing to Explore Implicit Memory.Chelsie M. Swenson - unknown - Dissertation,
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  3. The Effect of Subject's Sophistication on Responses to Spatial Tasks', Le Dessin Technique.J. B. DeregowskiI & S. Dziurawiec - forthcoming - Hermes.
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  4. Thinking Embodiment with Genetics: Epigenetics and Postgenomic Biology in Embodied Cognition and Enactivism.Maurizio Meloni & Jack Reynolds - forthcoming - Synthese:1-24.
    The role of the body in cognition is acknowledged across a variety of disciplines, even if the precise nature and scope of that contribution remain contentious. As a result, most philosophers working on embodiment—e.g. those in embodied cognition, enactivism, and ‘4e’ cognition—interact with the life sciences as part of their interdisciplinary agenda. Despite this, a detailed engagement with emerging findings in epigenetics and post-genomic biology has been missing from proponents of this embodied turn. Surveying this research provides an opportunity to (...)
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  5. Muscle Memory and the Somaesthetic Pathologies of Everyday Life. Shusterman - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
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  6. Declarative and Non-Declarative.L. R. Squire - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations.
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  7. Evidence for an Implicit Influence of Memory on Future Thinking.Karl K. Szpunar - forthcoming - Memory and Cognition.
  8. Embodied Grounding of Memory: Toward the Effects of Motor Execution on Memory Consolidation.Wessel O. van Dam, Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer, Harold Bekkering & Oliver Lindemann - forthcoming - Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology.
    Behavioural and neuroscientific research has provided evidence for a strong functional link between the neural motor system and lexical?semantic processing of action-related language. It remains unclear, however, whether the impact of motor actions is restricted to online language comprehension or whether sensorimotor codes are also important in the formation and consolidation of persisting memory representations of the word's referents. The current study now demonstrates that recognition performance for action words is modulated by motor actions performed during the retention interval. Specifically, (...)
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  9. Varieties of the Extended Self.Richard Heersmink - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 85:103001.
    This article provides an overview and analysis of recent work on the extended self, demonstrating that the boundaries of selves are fluid, shifting across biological, artifactual, and sociocultural structures. First, it distinguishes the notions of minimal self, person, and narrative self. Second, it surveys how philosophers, psychologists, and cognitive scientists argue that embodiment, cognition, emotion, consciousness, and moral character traits can be extended and what that implies for the boundaries of selves. It also reviews and responds to various criticisms and (...)
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  10. Cognition and the Web: Extended, Transactive, or Scaffolded?Richard Heersmink & John Sutton - 2020 - Erkenntnis 85 (1):139-164.
    In the history of external information systems, the World Wide Web presents a significant change in terms of the accessibility and amount of available information. Constant access to various kinds of online information has consequences for the way we think, act and remember. Philosophers and cognitive scientists have recently started to examine the interactions between the human mind and the Web, mainly focussing on the way online information influences our biological memory systems. In this article, we use concepts from the (...)
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  11. Nevědomí jako dvojznačné vědomí. Merleau-Ponty o psychoanalýze.Jan Puc - 2020 - Ostium 16 (1).
    Merleau-Ponty’s attitude to psychoanalysis was ambiguous. On the one hand, he realized that the phenomena psychoanalysis deals with require to go beyond the area of ​​act intentionality, and that, from a different angle, psychoanalysis addresses the same problem as Gestalt psychology, which played the central role in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophical project. On the other hand, he explicitly rejected the terms used by Freud for conveying his discoveries. Merleau-Ponty replaced unconscious mental contents, which act on conscious behavior, by ambiguous consciousness. In the (...)
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  12. The Best Memories: Identity, Narrative, and Objects.Richard Heersmink & Christopher Jade McCarroll - 2019 - In Timothy Shanahan & Paul Smart (eds.), Blade Runner 2049: A Philosophical Exploration. Routledge. pp. 87-107.
    Memory is everywhere in Blade Runner 2049. From the dead tree that serves as a memorial and a site of remembrance (“Who keeps a dead tree?”), to the ‘flashbulb’ memories individuals hold about the moment of the ‘blackout’, when all the electronic stores of data were irretrievably erased (“everyone remembers where they were at the blackout”). Indeed, the data wiped out in the blackout itself involves a loss of memory (“all our memory bearings from the time, they were all damaged (...)
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  13. Misplacing Memories? An Enactive Approach to the Virtual Memory Palace.Anco Peeters & Miguel Segundo-Ortin - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 76:102834.
    In this paper, we evaluate the pragmatic turn towards embodied, enactive thinking in cognitive science, in the context of recent empirical research on the memory palace technique. The memory palace is a powerful method for remembering yet it faces two problems. First, cognitive scientists are currently unable to clarify its efficacy. Second, the technique faces significant practical challenges to its users. Virtual reality devices are sometimes presented as a way to solve these practical challenges, but currently fall short of delivering (...)
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  14. The Roots of Remembering: Radically Enactive Recollecting.Daniel D. Hutto & Anco Peeters - 2018 - In Kourken Michaelian, Dorothea Debus & Denis Perrin (eds.), New Directions in the Philosophy of Memory. New York: Routledge. pp. 97-118.
    This chapter proposes a radically enactive account of remembering that casts it as creative, dynamic, and wide-reaching. It paints a picture of remembering that no longer conceives of it as involving passive recollections – always occurring wholly and solely inside heads. Integrating empirical findings from various sources, the chapter puts pressure on familiar cognitivist visions of remembering. Pivotally, it is argued, that we achieve a stronger and more elegant account of remembering by abandoning the widely held assumption that it is (...)
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  15. Memory and the Self: Phenomenology, Science and Autobiography. [REVIEW]Kourken Michaelian - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:177.
  16. Decreasing Materiality From Print to Screen Reading.Theresa Schilhab, Gitte Balling & Anezka Kuzmicova - 2018 - First Monday 23 (10).
    The shift from print to screen has bodily effects on how we read. We distinguish two dimensions of embodied reading: the spatio-temporal and the imaginary. The former relates to what the body does during the act of reading and the latter relates to the role of the body in the imagined scenarios we create from what we read. At the level of neurons, these two dimensions are related to how we make sense of the world. From this perspective, we explain (...)
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  17. Learning Without Storing: Wittgenstein’s Cognitive Science of Learning and Memory.Ian O'Loughlin - 2017 - In Michael A. Peters & Jeff Stickney (eds.), Pedagogical Investigations: A Companion to Wittgenstein on Education. Singapore: Springer. pp. 601-614.
    Education has recently been shaped by the cognitive science of memory. In turn, the science of memory has been infused by revolutionary ideas found in Wittgenstein’s works. However, the memory science presently applied to education draws mainly on traditional models that are quickly becoming outmoded; Wittgenstein’s insights have yet to be fruitfully applied, though they have helped to develop the science of memory. In this chapter, I examine three Wittgensteinian reforms in memory science as they pertain to education . First, (...)
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  18. The Cognitive Ecology of the Internet.Paul Smart, Richard Heersmink & Robert Clowes - 2017 - In Stephen Cowley & Frederic Vallée-Tourangeau (eds.), Cognition Beyond the Brain: Computation, Interactivity and Human Artifice (2nd ed.). Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 251-282.
    In this chapter, we analyze the relationships between the Internet and its users in terms of situated cognition theory. We first argue that the Internet is a new kind of cognitive ecology, providing almost constant access to a vast amount of digital information that is increasingly more integrated into our cognitive routines. We then briefly introduce situated cognition theory and its species of embedded, embodied, extended, distributed and collective cognition. Having thus set the stage, we begin by taking an embedded (...)
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  19. Attention and Memory-Driven Effects in Action Studies.Philip Tseng, Timothy Lane & Bruce Bridgeman - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
    : We provide empirical examples to conceptually clarify some items on Firestone & Scholl’s (F&S’s) checklist, and to explain perceptual effects from an attentional and memory perspective. We also note that action and embodied cognition studies seem to be most susceptible to misattributing attentional and memory effects as perceptual, and identify four characteristics unique to action studies and possibly responsible for misattributions.
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  20. Involuntary Memories and Restrained Eating.Christopher T. Ball - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:237-244.
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  21. Cartesianism, the Embodied Mind, and the Future of Cognitive Research.Philippe Gagnon - 2015 - In Dirk Evers, Michael Fuller, Anne Runehov & Knut-Willy Sæther (eds.), Do Emotions Shape the World? Biennial Yearbook of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology 2015-2016. Martin-Luther-Universität. pp. 225-244.
    In his oft-cited book Descartes' Error, Antonio Damasio claims that Descartes is responsible for having stifled the development of modern neurobiological science, in particular as regards the objective study of the physical and physiological bases for emotive and socially-conditioned cognition. Most of Damasio’s book would stand without reference to Descartes, so it is intriguing to ask why he launched this attack. What seems to fuel such claims is a desire for a more holistic understanding of the mind, the brain and (...)
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  22. Scaffolding Memory: Themes, Taxonomies, Puzzles.John Sutton - 2015 - In Lucas Bietti & Charlie Stone (eds.), Contextualizing Human Memory: An interdisciplinary approach to understanding how individuals and groups remember the past. Routledge. pp. 187-205..
    Through a selective historical, theoretical, and critical survey of the uses of the concept of scaffolding over the past 30 years, this chapter traces the development of the concept across developmental psychology, educational theory, and cognitive anthropology, and its place in the interdisciplinary field of distributed cognition from the 1990s. Offering a big-picture overview of the uses of the notion of scaffolding, it suggests three ways to taxonomise forms of scaffolding, and addresses the possible criticism that the metaphor of scaffolding (...)
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  23. Personal Memories.Marina Trakas - 2015 - Dissertation, Macquarie University
  24. Remembering Without Storing: Beyond Archival Models in the Science and Philosophy of Human Memory.Ian O'Loughlin - 2014 - Dissertation,
    Models of memory in cognitive science and philosophy have traditionally explained human remembering in terms of storage and retrieval. This tendency has been entrenched by reliance on computationalist explanations over the course of the twentieth century; even research programs that eschew computationalism in name, or attempt the revision of traditional models, demonstrate tacit commitment to computationalist assumptions. It is assumed that memory must be stored by means of an isomorphic trace, that memory processes must divide into conceptually distinct systems and (...)
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  25. Body Memory, Metaphor, and Movement. Sabine Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa, & Cornelia Müller (Eds.). Amsterdam, The Netherlands: John Benjamins, 2012. Vi + 468 Pages, $149.00 (Hardcover), ISBN 9789027213501. [REVIEW]Julio Santiago - 2014 - Metaphor and Symbol 29 (1):62-65.
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  26. Embodied Cognition, Representationalism, and Mechanism: A Review and Analysis.Jonathan S. Spackman & Stephen C. Yanchar - 2014 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):46-79.
    Embodied cognition has attracted significant attention within cognitive science and related fields in recent years. It is most noteworthy for its emphasis on the inextricable connection between mental functioning and embodied activity and thus for its departure from standard cognitive science's implicit commitment to the unembodied mind. This article offers a review of embodied cognition's recent empirical and theoretical contributions and suggests how this movement has moved beyond standard cognitive science. The article then clarifies important respects in which embodied cognition (...)
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  27. Embodied Remembering.John Sutton & Kellie Williamson - 2014 - In L. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge.
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, or (...)
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  28. Embodied Memory: Commemorative Ritual in Sociology Of.Alexey Vasilyev - 2014 - Russian Sociological Review 13 (2):141-167.
    Reconstruction of Émile Durkheim’s views on collective memory is the focus of the article. Durkheim had not created the completed concept of collective memory and his main attention was concentrated on its concrete form, that is to say the commemorative ritual. Thereby he laid the methodological foundations for further development of the concept of collective memory and influenced on later memory studies. Durkheim’s sociology leads with the necessity for a conclusion that for the support of stability of a community, its (...)
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  29. Embodied Remembering.Kellie Williamson & John Sutton - 2014 - In L. A. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge. pp. 315--325.
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, or (...)
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  30. Memory Systems, Processing Modes, and Components: Functional Neuroimaging Evidence.Roberto Cabeza & Morris Moscovitch - 2013 - Perspectives on Psychological Science 8:49-55.
    In the 1980s and 1990s, there was a major theoretical debate in the memory domain regarding the multiple memory systems and processing modes frameworks. The components of processing framework argued for a middle ground: Instead of neatly divided memory systems or processing modes, this framework proposed the existence of numerous processing components that are recruited in different combinations by memory tasks and yield complex patterns of associations and dissociations. Because behavioral evidence was not sufficient to decide among these three frameworks, (...)
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  31. Storytelling in Dementia: Embodiment as a Resource.Lars-Christer Hydén - 2013 - Dementia 12:359-367.
    In narrative research about persons with dementia, much research focuses on individual storytellers and their stories often stressing the discursive or textual aspects of stories. As persons with Alzheimer’s disease generally have difficulties in telling stories according to often implicit narrative norms, they may appear to be less competent and agentive than what is actually the case. In the article, I argue for a change of focus from the textual aspects of narratives and the story as a product, to a (...)
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  32. On Body Memory and Embodied Therapy.Sabine C. Koch, Christine Caldwell & Thomas Fuchs - 2013 - Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy 8:82-94.
    Whether in clinical or scientific contexts the phenomenon of body memory has become a central topic of interest within embodied and embedded theory approaches. Between 2000 and 2012, Prof. Dr. Thomas Fuchs, professor for philosophical foundations of psychiatry at the University of Heidelberg, has put forth a theory on the phenomenology of body memory (Fuchs, 2012). The professional mission of Prof. Fuchs is to combine a philosophical approach based on phenomenology with psychiatric experience. More specifically, his aim is to describe (...)
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  33. Social Memory and Ritual Performance.Rick Peterson - 2013 - Journal of Social Archaeology 13:266-283.
    This article is concerned with archaeological evidence for the mechanisms by which group memory is transmitted. Specifically, how do natural places such as caves and rock shelters retain their status as foci for ritual activity? It draws upon recent social and archaeological theory around embodied memory; in particular, Connerton’s (1989) division of memory claims into three kinds. These are: personal memory claims, cognitive memory claims and habit-memory. It is argued that cognitive memory claims and habit-memory should be regarded as aspects (...)
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  34. Metaphorical Instruction and Body Memory.Claudia Béger - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--187.
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  35. Body Memory and Dance.Monica E. Alarcon Davila - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--105.
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  36. Memory, Metaphor, and Mirroring in Movement Therapy with Trauma Patients.Marianne Eberhard-Kaechele - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--267.
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  37. The Phenomenology of Body Memory.Thomas Fuchs - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--9.
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  38. Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement.Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.) - 2012 - John Benjamins.
    Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement is an interdisciplinary volume with contributions from philosophers, cognitive scientists, and movement therapists. Part one provides the phenomenologically grounded definition of body memory with its different typologies. Part two follows the aim to integrate phenomenology, conceptual metaphor theory, and embodiment approaches from the cognitive sciences for the development of appropriate empirical methods to address body memory. Part three inquires into the forms and effects of therapeutic work with body memory, based on the integration of theory, (...)
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  39. Body Memory and the Emergence of Metaphor in Movement and Speech.Astrid Kolter, Silva H. Ladewig, H. Michela Summa, Cornelia Muller, Sabine C. Koch & Thomas Fuchs - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 201.
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  40. The Emergence of Body Memory in Authentic Movement.Ilka Konopatsch & Helen Payne - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--341.
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  41. Mental Imagery and Implicit Memory.Stephen M. Kosslyn & Samuel T. Moulton - 2012 - In Keith D. Markman, William M. P. Klein & Julie A. Suhr (eds.), Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. Psychology Press.
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  42. Focusing, Felt Sensing, and Body Memory.Elmar Kruithoff - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--387.
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  43. Embodied Memory: Body-Memory in the Performance Research of Jerzy Grotowski.Dominika Laster - 2012 - New Theatre Quarterly 28:211-229.
    In this article Dominika Laster examines the embodied-memory work undertaken by the Polish theatre director and performance researcher Jerzy Grotowski. While Grotowski approached work with memory – which in his practice necessarily implied body-memory – in a variety of ways, it was often as a mode of inquiry. For Grotowski, there were at least two different types of memory work, which emerge in two distinct phases of his research. The first was the use of body-memory undertaken during the Theatre of (...)
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  44. Embodied Collective Memory: The Making and Unmaking of Human Nature.Rafael F. Narváez - 2012 - Embodied Collective Memory: The Making and Unmaking of Human Nature.
    The human body is not a given fact; it is not, as Descartes believed, a machine made up of flesh and bones. The body is acquired, achieved, and learned. It is thus full of mimetic and mnemonic implications. The body remembers, and it does so in collectively relevant ways. Gestures, corporeal and phonetic rhythms, affective idioms, and emotional styles perceptual, sensorial, motoric, and affective schemata are all largely learned in shared social contexts. These aspects of the embodied experience are often (...)
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  45. Review of 'Cuerpo vivido'. [REVIEW]María G. Navarro - 2012 - Revista de Hispanismo Filosófico 17:283-286.
    Agustín Serrano de Haro edita y presenta en el volumen colectivo Cuerpo vivido una selección de textos memorables en torno a lo que en 1925 fue denominado programáticamente por Ortega y Gasset una “topografía de nuestra intimidad”. La reflexión fenomenológica acerca del intracuerpo fue un tema que ha preocupado y preocupa de manera notoria a los filósofos cuyos trabajos reúne este colectivo: Ortega y Gasset, José Gaos, Joaquín Xirau, Leopoldo-Eulogio Palacios y Agustín Serrano de Haro. Pese a ello, tal vez (...)
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  46. Development and Body Memory.Yona Shahar-Levy - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--327.
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  47. Body Memory and the Genesis of Meaning.Michela Summa - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--23.
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  48. Body Memory.Michela Summa, Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs & Cornelia Müller - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 417.
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  49. Minds in and Out of Time: Memory, Embodied Skill, Anachronism, and Performance.Evelyn Tribble & John Sutton - 2012 - Textual Practice 26 (4):587-607.
    Contemporary critical instincts, in early modern studies as elsewhere in literary theory, often dismiss invocations of mind and cognition as inevitably ahistorical, as performing a retrograde version of anachronism. Arguing that our experience of time is inherently anachronistic and polytemporal, we draw on the frameworks of distributed cognition and extended mind to theorize cognition as itself distributed, cultural, and temporal. Intelligent, embodied action is a hybrid process, involving the coordination of disparate neural, affective, cognitive, interpersonal, ecological, technological, and cultural resources. (...)
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  50. Chronic Suicidal Thoughts and Implicit Memory: Hypothesis and Practical Implications.Nicholas Bendit - 2011 - Australasian Psychiatry 19:25-29.
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