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  1. Body Memories of Aging Women.Lars Andersson - 2002 - In Cultural Gerontology. Greenwood Publishing Group.
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  2. Depression, Implicit Memory, and Self: A Revised Memory Model of Emotion.Elaine S. Barry, Mary J. Naus & Lynn P. Rehm - 2006 - Clinical Psychology Review 26:719-745.
    Cognitive constructs are explored for clinical psychologists interested in cognitive phenomena in depression. Both traditional and modern memory constructs are outlined and described with attention to their contribution to understanding depression. In particular, the notions of memory construction, self-schemas, and autobiographical memory (per [Conway, M.A. (2001). Sensory–perceptual episodic memory and its context: Autobiographical memory. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences, 356, 1375–1384.]) are discussed. Then, the phenomenon of implicit memory is described as a way to bring (...)
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  3. Memory of Touch.Tahseen Béa - 2008 - International Studies in Philosophy Monograph Series:5-82.
    Is the memory of touching always disguised by senses that forget where they come from? Creating distancethrough a mastery that constitutes the object as a monument built in place of the subject’s disappearance.The memory of touching? The most insistent and the most difficult to enter into memory. The one that entailsreturning to a commitment whose beginning and end cannot be recovered.Memory of the flesh, where that which has not yet been written is inscribed, laid down? That which has a place,has (...)
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  4. Metaphorical Instruction and Body Memory.Claudia Béger - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--187.
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  5. Chronic Suicidal Thoughts and Implicit Memory: Hypothesis and Practical Implications.Nicholas Bendit - 2011 - Australasian Psychiatry 19:25-29.
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  6. The Aesthetics of Sense-Memory: Theorising Trauma Through the Visual Arts.Jill Bennett - 2005 - In Susannah Radstone & Katharine Hodgkin (eds.), Memory Cultures: Memory, Subjectivity, And Recognition. Transaction Publishers.
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  7. Stored Virtue: Memory, the Body and the Evolutionary Museum.Tony Bennett - 2005 - In Susannah Radstone & Katharine Hodgkin (eds.), Memory Cultures: Memory, Subjectivity, And Recognition.
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  8. A Unitary Signal-Detection Model of Implicit and Explicit Memory.Christopher J. Berry, David R. Shanks & Richard N. A. Henson - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (10):367-373.
    Do dissociations imply independent systems? In the memory field, the view that there are independent implicit and explicit memory systems has been predominantly supported by dissociation evidence. Here, we argue that many of these dissociations do not necessarily imply distinct memory systems. We review recent work with a single-system computational model that extends signal-detection theory (SDT) to implicit memory. SDT has had a major influence on research in a variety of domains. The current work shows that it can be broadened (...)
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  9. Outliving Oneself: Trauma, Memory and Personal Identity.Susan J. Brison - 1996 - In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Feminists Rethink the Self (Feminist Theory and Politics Series). Westview Press.
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  10. Memory Systems, Processing Modes, and Components: Functional Neuroimaging Evidence.Roberto Cabeza & Morris Moscovitch - 2013 - Perspectives on Psychological Science 8:49-55.
    In the 1980s and 1990s, there was a major theoretical debate in the memory domain regarding the multiple memory systems and processing modes frameworks. The components of processing framework argued for a middle ground: Instead of neatly divided memory systems or processing modes, this framework proposed the existence of numerous processing components that are recruited in different combinations by memory tasks and yield complex patterns of associations and dissociations. Because behavioral evidence was not sufficient to decide among these three frameworks, (...)
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  11. My Synapses, Myself.William Calvin - unknown
    The self, Joseph LeDoux tells us, is “the totality of the living organism”. Most disciplines in the natural sciences focus on only one or two levels of organization. Indeed, Dmitri Mendeleev figured out the periodic table of the elements without knowing any of the underlying quantum mechanics or stereochemistry. There are, however, at least a dozen levels of organization within the neurosciences — and, if we use a metaphor, we temporarily create yet another. This leads to considerable confusion and arguments (...)
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  12. Inside the Frame of the Past : Memory, Diversity, and Solidarity.Sue Campbell - 2009 - In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 211--33.
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  13. Remembering: A Phenomenological Study.Edward S. Casey - 1987 - Indiana University Press.
    Edward S. Casey provides a thorough description of the varieties of human memory, including recognizing and reminding, reminiscing and commemorating, body memory and place memory. The preface to the new edition extends the scope of the original text to include issues of collective memory, forgetting, and traumatic memory, and aligns this book with Casey's newest work on place and space. This ambitious study demonstrates that nothing in our lives is unaffected by remembering.
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  14. Habitual Body and Memory in Merleau-Ponty.Edward S. Casey - 1984 - Man and World 17 (3-4):279-297.
  15. The Procedural Organization Of Emotions: A Contribution From Cognitive Science To The.Robert Clyman - 1991 - Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 39.
    Recent research in cognitive science has demonstrated that there are differe nt types of memory processes. While declarative memory refers to memories for facts or events which can be recalled, procedural memories underlie skills yet encode information which cannot be recalled. This paper extends this distinction to the nature of emotions and emotional memories. Its implications for psychoanalytic theory are then examined, yielding fresh views of transference, defense, and treatment. Infantile amnesia is found to result partially from the immaturity of (...)
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  16. Memory and Trauma: Examining Disruptions in Implicit, Explicit and Autobiographical Memory.Melody D. Combs & Anne P. DePrince - 2010 - In Ruth A. Lanius, Eric Vermetten & Clare Pain (eds.), The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease. Cambridge University Press.
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  17. How Societies Remember.Paul Connerton - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    Most studies of memory as a cultural faculty focus on written practices and how they are transmitted. This study concentrates on incorporated practices and provides an account of how these things are transmitted in and as traditions. The author argues that images and recollected knowledge of the past are conveyed and sustained by ritual performances, and that performative memory is bodily. This is an essential aspect of social memory that until now has been badly neglected.
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  18. Glenberg's Embodied Memory: Less Than Meets the Eye.Robert G. Crowder & Heidi E. Wenk - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):21-22.
    We are sympathetic to most of what Glenberg says in his target article, but we consider it common wisdom rather than something radically new. Others have argued persuasively against the idea of abstraction in cognition, for example. On the other hand, Hebbian connectionism cannot get along without the idea of association, at least at the neural level.
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  19. Embodied Memory, Transcendence, and Telling: Recounting Trauma, Re-Establishing the Self.Roberta Culbertson - 1995 - New Literary History 26:169-195.
  20. Body Memory and Dance.Monica E. Alarcon Davila - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--105.
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  21. Revising Psychoanalytic Interpretations of the Past.J. Timothy Davis - 2001 - International Journal of Psychoanalysis 82:449-462.
    The author reviews a contemporary cognitive psychology perspective on memory that views memory as being composed of multiple separate systems. Most researchers draw a fundamental distinction between declarative/explicit and non-declarative/implicit forms of memory. Declarative memory is responsible for the conscious recollection of facts and events - what is typically meant by the everyday and the common psychoanalytic use of the word ‘memory’. Non-declarative forms of memory, in contrast, are specialised processes that influence experience and behaviour without representing the past in (...)
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  22. Embodiment in Language-Based Memory: Some Qualifications.Manuel de Vega - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):22-23.
    (1) Non-projectable properties as opposed to the clamping of projectable properties play a primary role in triggering and guiding human action. (2) Embodiment in language-mediated memories should be qualified: (a) Language imposes a radical discretization on body constraints (second-order embodiment). (b) Metaphors rely on second-order embodiment. (c) Language users sometimes suspend embodiment.
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  23. Methodology and the Nature of Knowing How.Michael Devitt - 2011 - Journal of Philosophy 108 (4):205-218.
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  24. Das anwesend Abwesende: Musik und Erinnerung.Andreas Dorschel - 2007 - In Resonanzen. Vom Erinnern in der Musik. Universal Edition. pp. 12-29.
    Remembrance is constitutive of music. For music emerges not as an isolated physical stimulus. Rather, it is experienced, i.e., a present musical moment is tied to its temporal antecedents. It is tempting to conceive of remembrance as repetition and as thus opposed to oblivion. Yet to memory selectivity is crucial. What is not selected, falls into oblivion. Hence as we remember we have forgotten already. The present moment evokes remembrance, and exhibits what was then in the light of what is (...)
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  25. Memory, Metaphor, and Mirroring in Movement Therapy with Trauma Patients.Marianne Eberhard-Kaechele - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--267.
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  26. Phenomenological Coping Skills and the Striatal Memory System.Elizabeth Ennen - 2003 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):299-325.
    Most cognitive scientists are committed to some version of representationalism, the view that intelligent behavior is caused by internal processes that involve computations over representations. Phenomenologists, however, argue that certain types of intelligent behavior, engaged coping skills, are nonrepresentational. Recent neuroscientific work on multiple memory systems indicates that while many types of intelligent behavior are representational, the types of intelligent behavior cited by phenomenologists are indeed nonrepresentational. This neuroscientific research thus vindicates a key phenomenological claim about the nature of intelligent (...)
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  27. Remembrance of Things Passed: Memory, Body and the Politics of Feasting in New Ireland, Papua New Guinea.Richard Eves - 1996 - Oceania 66:266-277.
    This paper explores the connection between body and memory for the people of the Lelet Plateau of central New Ireland. Through an examination of the processes by which memories of mortuary feasts are created and circulated, I draw attention to the embodied nature of memory as a central facet in the politics of feasting. The approach taken here differs from other prevailing approaches to the body and memory in its exploration of the ways in which memories are created through and (...)
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  28. Gendering Embodied Memory.Linda Fisher - 2011 - In Christina Schües, Dorothea Olkowski & Helen Fielding (eds.), Time in Feminist Phenomenology. Indiana University Press. pp. 14--91.
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  29. The Explicit and Implicit Domains in Psychoanalytic Change.James L. Fosshage - 2005 - Psychoanalytic Inquiry 25:516-539.
    New research findings of the development and organization of the mind, brain, and behavior bolster the ongoing relational- or intersubjective-field paradigmatic revision of psychoanalytic theory. A multisystems view of learning, memory, and knowledge provide us with a more complex picture of information processing that has fundamental implications for a psychoanalytic theory of therapeutic action. If the implicit and explicit learning/memory systems are viewed as parallel processes, not easily translatable from one to the other, then new implicit relational experience carries considerably (...)
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  30. The Phenomenology of Body Memory.Thomas Fuchs - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--9.
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  31. Cartesianism, the Embodied Mind, and the Future of Cognitive Research.Philippe Gagnon - 2015 - In Dirk Evers, Michael Fuller, Anne Runehov & Knut-Willy Sæther (eds.), Do Emotions Shape the World? Biennial Yearbook of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology 2015-2016. Martin-Luther-Universität. pp. 225-244.
    In his oft-cited book Descartes' Error, Antonio Damasio claims that Descartes is responsible for having stifled the development of modern neurobiological science, in particular as regards the objective study of the physical and physiological bases for emotive and socially-conditioned cognition. Most of Damasio’s book would stand without reference to Descartes, so it is intriguing to ask why he launched this attack. What seems to fuel such claims is a desire for a more holistic understanding of the mind, the brain and (...)
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  32. Embodiment as a Unifying Perspective for Psychology.Arthur M. Glenberg - 2010 - Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews 1:586-596.
    A basic claim of the embodiment framework is that all psychological processes are influenced by body morphology, sensory systems, motor systems, and emotions. As such, the framework holds the promise of providing a unifying perspective for psychological research. This article begins with a sketch of several arguments, from evolution to philosophy, as to why the embodiment framework is a good bet. These arguments are followed by a review of approaches to embodiment, including those from cognitive linguistics, perceptual symbol theory, and (...)
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  33. What Memory is For.Arthur M. Glenberg - 1997 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):1-19.
    I address the commentators' calls for clarification of theoretical terms, discussion of similarities to other proposals, and extension of the ideas. In doing so, I keep the focus on the purpose of memory: enabling the organism to make sense of its environment so that it can take action appropriate to constraints resulting from the physical, personal, social, and cultural situations.
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  34. Embodied Meaning and Negative Priming.Arthur M. Glenberg, David A. Robertson, Michael P. Kaschak & Alan J. Malter - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):644-647.
    Standard models of cognition are built from abstract, amodal, arbitrary symbols, and the meanings of those symbols are given solely by their interrelations. The target article (Glenberg 1997t) argues that these models must be inadequate because meaning cannot arise from relations among abstract symbols. For cognitive representations to be meaningful they must, at the least, be grounded; but abstract symbols are difficult, if not impossible, to ground. As an alternative, the target article developed a framework in which representations are grounded (...)
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  35. Marked by Memory: Feminist Reflections on Trauma and Transmission.Marianne Hirsch - 2002 - In Nancy K. Miller & Jason Tougaw (eds.), Extremities: Trauma, Testimony, Community. Illinois University Press.
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  36. Believing the Body. Introduction.Katharine Hodgkin & Susannah Radstone - 2005 - In Katharine Hodgkin & Susannah Radstone (eds.), Memory Cultures: Memory, Subjectivity, and Recognition. Transaction Publishers.
    This section is concerned with the possibility of embodied memory -of memories that are carried in the body and that may be transmitted between bodies, even across generations.
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  37. Ego Duplications, Body Doubles, and Dreams: A Contribution To a Phenomenology of Body Image and Memory.Stephan J. Holajter - 1995 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 26 (2):71-102.
    In this paper an "unconscious" structure common to such altered psychological states as dreaming, schizophrenic disintegration, out-of body experiences, and creative acts is described. This description is accomplished by setting psychoanalytic, clinical, and empirical studies zuithin a phenomenological framework. Phenomenological self-reflection is first made a party to discussions which focus on memories and the experience of the lived body. The configurations of "unconsciousness" then take precedence in describing relationships between the "I" of waking consciousness and a transformative body image . (...)
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  38. Procedural Memory in Dissociative Identity Disorder: When Can Inter-Identity Amnesia Be Truly Established?☆.Rafaële J. C. Huntjens, Albert Postma, Liesbeth Woertman, Onno van Der Hart & Madelon L. Peters - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (2):377-389.
    In a serial reaction time task, procedural memory was examined in Dissociative Identity Disorder . Thirty-one DID patients were tested for inter-identity transfer of procedural learning and their memory performance was compared with 25 normal controls and 25 controls instructed to simulate DID. Results of patients seemed to indicate a pattern of inter-identity amnesia. Simulators, however, were able to mimic a pattern of inter-identity amnesia, rendering the results of patients impossible to interpret as either a pattern of amnesia or a (...)
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  39. Storytelling in Dementia: Embodiment as a Resource.Lars-Christer Hydén - 2013 - Dementia 12:359-367.
    In narrative research about persons with dementia, much research focuses on individual storytellers and their stories often stressing the discursive or textual aspects of stories. As persons with Alzheimer’s disease generally have difficulties in telling stories according to often implicit narrative norms, they may appear to be less competent and agentive than what is actually the case. In the article, I argue for a change of focus from the textual aspects of narratives and the story as a product, to a (...)
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  40. "Pulling Teeth and Torture" : Musical Memory and Problem Solving.Roger Chaffin Gabriela Imreh - 1997 - Thinking and Reasoning 3 (4):315 – 336.
    A concert pianist the second author videotaped herself learning J.S. Bach's Italian Concerto Presto , and commented on the problems she encountered as she practised. Approximately two years later the pianist wrote out the first page of the score from memory. The pianist's verbal reports indicated that in the early sessions she identified and memorised the formal structure of the piece, and in the later sessions she practised using this organisation to retrieve the memory cues that controlled her playing. The (...)
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  41. Implicit and Explicit Memory and Learning.John F. Kihlstrom, Jennifer Dorfman & Lillian Park - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell. pp. 525--539.
    Learning and memory are inextricably intertwined. The capacity for learning presupposes an ability to retain the knowledge acquired through experience, while memory stores the background knowledge against which new learning takes place. During the dark years of radical behaviorism, when the concept of memory was deemed too mentalistic to be a proper subject of scientific study, research on human memory took the form of research on verbal learning (Anderson, 2000; Schwartz & Reisberg, 1991).
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  42. On Body Memory and Embodied Therapy.Sabine C. Koch, Christine Caldwell & Thomas Fuchs - 2013 - Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy 8:82-94.
    Whether in clinical or scientific contexts the phenomenon of body memory has become a central topic of interest within embodied and embedded theory approaches. Between 2000 and 2012, Prof. Dr. Thomas Fuchs, professor for philosophical foundations of psychiatry at the University of Heidelberg, has put forth a theory on the phenomenology of body memory (Fuchs, 2012). The professional mission of Prof. Fuchs is to combine a philosophical approach based on phenomenology with psychiatric experience. More specifically, his aim is to describe (...)
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  43. Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement.Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.) - 2012 - John Benjamins.
    Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement is an interdisciplinary volume with contributions from philosophers, cognitive scientists, and movement therapists. Part one provides the phenomenologically grounded definition of body memory with its different typologies. Part two follows the aim to integrate phenomenology, conceptual metaphor theory, and embodiment approaches from the cognitive sciences for the development of appropriate empirical methods to address body memory. Part three inquires into the forms and effects of therapeutic work with body memory, based on the integration of theory, (...)
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  44. Body Memory and the Emergence of Metaphor in Movement and Speech.Astrid Kolter, Silva H. Ladewig, H. Michela Summa, Cornelia Muller, Sabine C. Koch & Thomas Fuchs - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 201.
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  45. The Emergence of Body Memory in Authentic Movement.Ilka Konopatsch & Helen Payne - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--341.
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  46. Mental Imagery and Implicit Memory.Stephen M. Kosslyn & Samuel T. Moulton - 2012 - In Keith D. Markman, William M. P. Klein & Julie A. Suhr (eds.), Handbook of Imagination and Mental Simulation. Psychology Press.
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  47. Focusing, Felt Sensing, and Body Memory.Elmar Kruithoff - 2012 - In Sabine C. Koch, Thomas Fuchs, Michela Summa & Cornelia Müller (eds.), Body Memory, Metaphor and Movement. John Benjamins. pp. 84--387.
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  48. The Problem of Content in Embodied Memory.Martin Kurthen, Thomas Grunwald, Christoph Helmstaedter & Christian E. Elger - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):641-642.
    An action-oriented theory of embodied memory is favorable for many reasons, but it will not provide a quick yet clean solution to the grounding problem in the way Glenberg (1997t) envisages. Although structural mapping via analogical representations may be an adequate mechanism of cognitive representation, it will not suffice to explain representation as such.
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  49. Embodied Memory: Body-Memory in the Performance Research of Jerzy Grotowski.Dominika Laster - 2012 - New Theatre Quarterly 28:211-229.
    In this article Dominika Laster examines the embodied-memory work undertaken by the Polish theatre director and performance researcher Jerzy Grotowski. While Grotowski approached work with memory – which in his practice necessarily implied body-memory – in a variety of ways, it was often as a mode of inquiry. For Grotowski, there were at least two different types of memory work, which emerge in two distinct phases of his research. The first was the use of body-memory undertaken during the Theatre of (...)
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  50. “Implicit Memory” Cannot Explain Dissociated Traumatic Memory: A Theoretical Critique.Madelyn Simring Milchman - 2003 - Journal of Trauma and Dissociation 4:27-49.
    ABSTRACT Similarities between implicit memories and unprocessed traumatic memories have led traumatologists to equate them. Both have physicality: They are grounded in the body rather than narrative, being retrieved in sensations, motor responses, affects, ego states, and images. Sheltered from the cognitive processes that use language to alter memories, they remain stable over time, unconscious, and dependent on specific retrieval cues that replicate part of the original event. Nevertheless, if dissociation produces unprocessed traumatic memories whereas association produces implicit memories, how (...)
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