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  1. Too Close for Comfort and/or Validity.T. Galguera - forthcoming - Ethics.
  2. Robert A. Millikan Meets the Credibility Revolution: Comment on Harrison , ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’.Nathaniel T. Wilcox - forthcoming - Journal of Economic Methodology:1-9.
    Millikan's famous oil drop experiment is scrutinized from the viewpoint of the methodological dicta of the credibility revolution.
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  3. Holding Back From Theory: Limits and Methodological Alternatives of Randomized Field Experiments in Development Economics.Judith Favereau & Michiru Nagatsu - 2020 - Journal of Economic Methodology 27 (3):191-211.
    In this paper, we critically and constructively examine the methodology of evidence-based development economics, which deploys randomized field experiments as its main tool. We describe the...
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  4. Measuring Utility: From the Marginal Revolution to Behavioral Economics.Lukas Beck & Anna Alexandrova - 2019 - Journal of Economic Methodology 26 (4):380-384.
    Volume 26, Issue 4, December 2019, Page 380-384.
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  5. Prediction Versus Accommodation in Economics.Robert Northcott - 2019 - Journal of Economic Methodology 26 (1):59-69.
    Should we insist on prediction, i.e. on correctly forecasting the future? Or can we rest content with accommodation, i.e. empirical success only with respect to the past? I apply general considerations about this issue to the case of economics. In particular, I examine various ways in which mere accommodation can be sufficient, in order to see whether those ways apply to economics. Two conclusions result. First, an entanglement thesis: the need for prediction is entangled with the methodological role of orthodox (...)
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  6. Why Economists Do Not Convince Folks?Tommaso Ostillio - 2019 - The Digital Scholar: Philosopher's Lab 2 (4):168-174.
    This paper argues that economics is epistemologically limited in at least two main ways: first, economics fails at managing uncertainty as effectively as natural sciences do; second, economics assumes that rational patterns of utility maximization are real just to ensure deduction within economic models. Hence, this paper maintains that the high level of abstraction from reality of economics limits its explanations of its constantly changing ontology, i.e. markets. In particular, this paper shows that the epistemological limitations of economics become evident (...)
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  7. Experiments, Policy, and Theory in Development Economics: A Response to Glenn Harrison’s ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’.Thomas Bossuroy & Clara Delavallade - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):147-156.
    In ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance,’ Glenn Harrison develops a criticism of randomized field experiments and denounces ‘intolerance’ for lab experiments and a ‘disconnect from theory.’ We argue that lab experiments and RCTs are based on different methodological approaches and therefore fulfill different scientific objectives; key features of the RCT methodology make it highly relevant for policy-making, which accounts for a large part of its uptake; RCTs foster a convergence of interests between policy-makers and researchers around the study of economic (...)
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  8. Methodological Ignorance: A Comment on Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance.Marcel Boumans - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):139-146.
    Glenn Harrison [Journal of Economic Methodology, 2013, 20, 103–117] discusses four related forms of methodological intolerance with respect to field experiments: field experiments should rely on some form of randomization, should be disconnected from theory, the concept of causality should only be defined in terms of observables, and the role of laboratory experiments is dismissed. As is often the case, the cause of intolerance is ignorance, as it is here. To acquire knowledge about potential influences, which we need for both (...)
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  9. Five Theses on Neuroeconomics.Roberto Fumagalli - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (1):77-96.
    Over the last decade, neuroeconomic research has attracted increasing attention by economic modellers and methodologists. In this paper, I examine five issues about neuroeconomic modelling and methodology that have recently been subject to considerable controversy. For each issue, I explicate and appraise prominent neuroeconomists' findings, focusing on those that are claimed to directly inform economic theorizing. Moreover, I assess often-made assertions concerning how neuroeconomic research putatively advances the economic modelling of choice. In doing so, I combine review and critical arguments (...)
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  10. Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance: Reply.Glenn W. Harrison - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):157-159.
  11. Artificiality, Reactivity, and Demand Effects in Experimental Economics.Maria Jimenez-Buedo & Francesco Guala - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (1):3-23.
    A series of recent debates in experimental economics have associated demand effects with the artificiality of the experimental setting and have linked it to the problem of external validity. In this paper, we argue that these associations can be misleading, partly because of the ambiguity with which “artificiality” has been defined, but also because demand effects and external validity are related in complex ways. We argue that artificiality may be directly as well as inversely correlated with demand effects. We also (...)
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  12. Introduction to Discussion Forum on Glenn W. Harrison’s ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’.Don Ross - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):127-129.
  13. Robert A. Millikan Meets the Credibility Revolution: Comment on Harrison , ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’1.Nathaniel T. Wilcox - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):130-138.
    Millikan's famous oil drop experiment is scrutinized from the viewpoint of the methodological dicta of the credibility revolution.
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  14. For a Few Neurons More: Tractability and Neurally Informed Economic Modelling.Matteo Colombo - 2015 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 66 (4):713-736.
    There continues to be significant confusion about the goals, scope, and nature of modelling practice in neuroeconomics. This article aims to dispel some such confusion by using one of the most recent critiques of neuroeconomic modelling as a foil. The article argues for two claims. First, currently, for at least some economic model of choice behaviour, the benefits derivable from neurally informing an economic model do not involve special tractability costs. Second, modelling in neuroeconomics is best understood within Marr’s three-level (...)
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  15. External Validity: Is There Still a Problem?Alexandre Marcellesi - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (5):1308-1317.
    I first propose to distinguish between two kinds of external validity inferences, predictive and explanatory. I then argue that we have a satisfactory answer to the question of the conditions under which predictive external validity inferences are good. If this claim is correct, then it has two immediate consequences: First, some external validity inferences are deductive, contrary to what is commonly assumed. Second, Steel’s requirement that an account of external validity inference break what he calls the ‘Extrapolator’s Circle’ is misplaced, (...)
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  16. Internal and External.Charles R. Beitz - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):225-238.
    James's Fairness in Trade seeks to offer an account of fair trade that is “internal” to an existing practice he describes as “mutual market reliance.” This paper distinguishes several senses of the distinction between “internal” and “external” that occur in the book and asks how, in its various senses, the distinction shapes and influences judgments about the fairness of the practice.
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  17. The Role of Experiments in Economics: Reply to Jones.Francesco Guala - 2014 - Economics and Philosophy 30 (3):503-511.
    Martin Jones has criticized my account of the methodology of experimental economics on three points: the impossibility of testing external validity claims in the laboratory, my reconstruction of external validity inferences as analogical arguments, and the distinction between laboratory and non-laboratory sciences. I defend my account here and try to eliminate some misunderstandings that may have prompted Jones’s criticism.
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  18. Large-Scale Social Experiments in Experimental Ethics.Julian F. Mueller - 2014 - In Hannes Rusch & Matthias Uhl (eds.), Experimental Ethics. Palgrave.
    In this article, I argue that experimental ethics – like experimental economics – should also concern itself with field experiments. In particular, I defend two claims: a) that philosophers in normative ethics could considerably narrow down their disputes if they could agree on a wider range of socio-economic facts; and that b) the socio-economic facts that would be needed for this could only be generated by deliberate large-scale social experimentation. This essay normatively grounds my interest in special administration zones.
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  19. Hypotheses Non Fingo: Problems with the Scientific Method in Economics.J. Doyne Farmer - 2013 - Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):377-385.
    Although it is often said that economics is too much like physics, to a physicist economics is not at all like physics. The difference is in the scientific methods of the two fields: theoretical economics uses a top down approach in which hypothesis and mathematical rigor come first and empirical confirmation comes second. Physics, in contrast, embraces the bottom up ‘experimental philosophy’ of Newton, in which ‘hypotheses are inferred from phenomena, and afterward rendered general by induction’. Progress would accelerates if (...)
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  20. Popper, Rationality and the Possibility of Social Science.Danny Frederick - 2013 - Theoria : An International Journal for Theory, History and Fundations of Science 28 (1):61-75.
    Social science employs teleological explanations which depend upon the rationality principle, according to which people exhibit instrumental rationality. Popper points out that people also exhibit critical rationality, the tendency to stand back from, and to question or criticise, their views. I explain how our critical rationality impugns the explanatory value of the rationality principle and thereby threatens the very possibility of social science. I discuss the relationship between instrumental and critical rationality and show how we can reconcile our critical rationality (...)
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  21. Fallibility in Formal Macroeconomics and Finance Theory.Roman Frydman & Michael D. Goldberg - 2013 - Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):386-396.
    This note focuses on George Soros's challenge to macroeconomics and finance theory that any valid methodology of social science must explicitly recognize fallibility in a Knightian sense. We use a simple algebraic example to sketch how extant models formalize fallibility. We argue that contemporary theory's epistemological and empirical difficulties can be traced to assuming away fallibility in a Knightian sense. We also discuss how imperfect knowledge economics provides a way to open mathematical models to such fallibility, while preserving economics as (...)
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  22. Discussion: Internal Impediments: D. Goldstick.D. Goldstick - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (2):313-315.
    Not everything that it's ‘possible’ FOR you to do is something it's ‘possible’ THAT you will do. The compatibilist freedom formula ‘absence of impediments’ must embrace external and internal – including psychological – impediments. Desires are impediments only when they impede, owing to motivational conflict. But other impediments, external or internal, require merely the potential to impede.
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  23. Parameters of Social Preference Functions: Measurement and External Validity.Christoph Graf, Rudolf Vetschera & Yingchao Zhang - 2013 - Theory and Decision 74 (3):357-382.
    Most of the existing literature on social preferences either tests whether certain characteristics of the social context influence individual decisions, or tries to estimate parameters of social preference functions describing such behavior at the level of the entire population. In the present paper, we are concerned with measuring parameters of social preference functions at the individual level. We draw upon concepts developed for eliciting other types of utility functions, in particular the literature on decision making under incomplete information. Our method (...)
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  24. Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance.Glenn W. Harrison - 2013 - Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (2):103-117.
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  25. Reflexivity, Expectations Feedback and Almost Self-Fulfilling Equilibria: Economic Theory, Empirical Evidence and Laboratory Experiments.Cars Hommes - 2013 - Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (4):406-419.
    We discuss recent work on bounded rationality and learning in relation to Soros' principle of reflexivity and stress the empirical importance of non-rational, almost self-fulfilling equilibria in positive feedback systems. As an empirical example, we discuss a behavioral asset pricing model with heterogeneous expectations. Bubble and crash dynamics is triggered by shocks to fundamentals and amplified by agents switching endogenously between a mean-reverting fundamental rule and a trend-following rule, based upon their relative performance. We also discuss learning-to-forecast laboratory experiments, showing (...)
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  26. Experiments In Economics And Philosophy.James Konow, Eric Schwitzgebel, Cristina Bicchieri, Jason Dana & María Jiménez-Buedo - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):151-153.
    Not so long ago, many economists and philosophers felt that their disciplines had no use for experimental methods. An experimental study was, by its nature, ‘not economics’ or ‘not philosophy’ – psychology maybe. Opinion has changed dramatically. This issue of Economics and Philosophy represents a collection of recent contributions to experimental research that explicitly deal with empirical findings or methodological questions in the intersection of the two disciplines. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first such collection dedicated (...)
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  27. Nature’s Experiments and Natural Experiments in the Social Sciences.Mary S. Morgan - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (3):341-357.
    This article explores the characteristics of research sites that scientists have called “natural experiments” to understand and develop usable distinctions for the social sciences between “Nature’s or Society’s experiments” and “natural experiments.” In this analysis, natural experiments emerge as the retro-fitting by social scientists of events that have happened in the social world into the traditional forms of field or randomized trial experiments. By contrast, “Society’s experiments” figure as events in the world that happen in circumstances that are already sufficiently (...)
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  28. The Limits of Unification for Theory Appraisal: A Case of Economics and Psychology.Michiru Nagatsu - 2013 - Synthese 190 (2):2267-2289.
    In this paper I examine Don Ross’s application of unificationism as a methodological criterion of theory appraisal in economics and cognitive science. Against Ross’s critique that explanations of the preference reversal phenomenon by the ‘heuristics and biases’ programme is ad hoc or ‘Ptolemaic’, I argue that the compatibility hypothesis, one of the explanations offerd by this programme, is theoretically and empirically well-motivated. A careful examination of this hypothesis suggests several strengths of a procedural approach to modelling cognitive processes underlying individual (...)
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  29. Reliability and External Validity of Neurobiological Experiments.Wong Muk Yan - 2013 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (4):429-446.
    Reliability and external validity are two fundamental values that pose incompatible constraints on neurobiological experiments. The more reliability an experimental result achieves, the less external validity it earns, and vice versa. In this article, I propose an externalist interpretation of external validity: the external validity of an experimental result depends not only on how much complexity is built into an experimental design, but also on the relationship between the experimental result and other related experiments. This externalist interpretation, which explains how (...)
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  30. The Two Images of Economics: Why the Fun Disappears When Difficult Questions Are at Stake?N. Emrah Aydinonat - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):243-258.
    The image of economics got somewhat puzzling after the crisis of 2008. Many economists now doubt that economics is able to provide answers to some of its core questions. The crisis was not so fun for economics. However, this not so fun image of economics is not the only image in the eyes of the general public. When one looks at economics-made-fun (EMF) books (e.g. Freakonomics, The Undercover Economist, etc.), economics seems to be an explanatory science which is able to (...)
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  31. Measurement in Economics.Marcel Boumans - 2012 - In Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.), Philosophy of Economics. North Holland. pp. 395.
  32. A Test of the Experimental Method in the Spirit of Popper.Shaun Hargreaves Heap, Arjan Verschoor & Daniel John Zizzo - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):63-76.
    Do the insights into human behavior generated by laboratory experiments hold outside the lab? This is a crucial question that naturally troubles both experimentalists and their critics. We address this question by adopting Popper's injunction that hypotheses should be tested, not by seeking instances of confirmation, but through exposure to conditions where falsification is a serious possibility. We test the hypothesis ?that experimental insights hold outside the lab? by selecting a population where the non-experimental evidence points to behavior that is (...)
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  33. Adam Smith and the Modern Science of Ethics.James Konow - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):333-362.
    Third-party decision-makers, or spectators, have emerged as a useful empirical tool in modern social science research on moral motivation. Spectators of a sort also serve a central role in Adam Smith's moral theory. This paper compares these two types of spectatorship with respect to their goals, methodologies, visions of human nature and emphasis on moral rules. I find important similarities and differences and conclude that this comparison suggests significant opportunities for philosophical ethics to inform empirical and theoretical research on moral (...)
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  34. Questions of Scale in Economic Laboratory Experiments.Harro Maas - 2012 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 13 (1):103.
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  35. Gigerenzer’s ‘External Validity Argument’ Against the Heuristics and Biases Program: An Assessment.Andrea Polonioli - 2012 - Mind and Society 11 (2):133-148.
    Gigerenzer’s ‘external validity argument’ plays a pivotal role in his critique of the heuristics and biases research program (HB). The basic idea is that (a) the experimental contexts deployed by HB are not representative of the real environment and that (b) the differences between the setting and the real environment are causally relevant, because they result in different performances by the subjects. However, by considering Gigerenzer’s work on frequencies in probability judgments, this essay attempts to show that there are fatal (...)
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  36. Warranting the Use of Causal Claims: A Non-Trivial Case for Interdisciplinarity.Menno Rol & Nancy Cartwright - 2012 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 27 (2):189-202.
    To what use can causal claims established in good policy studies be put? We isolate two reasons inferences from study to target fail. First, policy variables do not produce results on their own; they need helping factors. The distribution of helping factors is likely to be unique or local for each study, so one cannot expect external validity to be all that common. Second, researchers often give too concrete a description of the cause in the study for it to carry (...)
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  37. Drawing Lessons From Case Studies by Enhancing Comparability.Attilia Ruzzene - 2012 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (1):99-120.
    External validity is typically regarded as the downside of case study research by methodologists and social scientists; case studies, however, are often aimed at drawing lessons that are generalizable to new contexts. The gap between the generalizability potential of case studies and the research goals demands closer scrutiny. I suggest that the conclusion that case study research is weak in external validity follows from a set of assumptions that I term the "traditional view," which are disputable at best. In this (...)
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  38. New Directions in Economics and the Philosophy of Economics? The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics.Roger E. Backhouse - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):305-311.
  39. Economic Methodology: Understanding Economics as a Science.Ivan A. Boldyrev - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):427-432.
  40. Review of Experimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules. [REVIEW]Andrew Caplin - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):179-183.
  41. Comments on 'Error in Economics: Toward a More Evidence-Based Methodology' by Julian Reiss.John E. DiNardo - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):87-92.
    We find prejudices in favor of theory, as far back as there is institutionalized science. Plato and Aristotle frequented the Academy at Athens. That building is located on one side of the Agora, or market place. It is almost as far as possible from the Herculaneum, the temple to the goddess of fire, the patron of the metallurgists. It is ?on the other side of the tracks?. True to this class distinction, we all know a little about Greek geometry and (...)
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  42. How Economic Methodology Became a Separate Science.Till Düppe - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):163-176.
    Ever since the formation of the field of economic methodology in the 1990s, doubts have been raised about its discursive closure from both inside and outside the field. Rather than embarking on a programmatic discussion, I present a historical narrative regarding the conditions of the formation of the field, which may have necessitated this closure. These conditions are found in the role methodological reflections played in the formalist revolution of the 1950s and in its critique in the 1970s. Both episodes (...)
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  43. Theory-Centrism in Experimental Economics.Francesco Guala - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):83-86.
  44. How Validity Travelled to Economic Experimenting.Floris Heukelom - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):13-28.
    Validity was first given a more specifically scientific meaning by psychologists in the early twentieth century in the contexts of psychological tests. Following the classification of different validity-types in the American Psychological Association's Technical Recommendations, validity travelled from psychological tests to psychological experiments through the work of Donald Campbell. Thus the idea was introduced that also experiments could be more or less valid. In addition, a distinction was made between the internal and the external validity of an experiment. Of the (...)
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  45. Conceptual Tools for Assessing Experiments: Some Well-Entrenched Confusions Regarding the Internal/External Validity Distinction.María Jiménez-Buedo - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):271-282.
    The notions of internal and external validity of an experiment, coined by Donald T. Campbell in the context of social scientific quasi-experimentation more than 50 years ago, are still central in the debates around the experimental method, both for practitioners and for philosophers of science. This paper points at the more problematic aspects of the distinction between the internal and external validity of experiments and, with a focus on the field of behavioural economics, traces the many misunderstandings that surround the (...)
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  46. Review of The Social Epistemology of Experimental Economics. [REVIEW]Martin Jones - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):64-69.
  47. External Validity and Libraries of Phenomena: A Critique of Guala's Methodology of Experimental Economics: Martin K. Jones.Martin K. Jones - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (3):247-271.
    Francesco Guala has developed some novel and radical ideas on the problem of external validity, a topic that has not received much attention in the experimental economics literature. In this paper I argue that his views on external validity are not justified and the conclusions which he draws from these views, if widely adopted, could substantially undermine the experimental economics enterprise. In rejecting the justification of these views, the paper reaffirms the importance of experiments in economics.
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  48. Experiments on an Internal Approach to Typed Algorithms in Analysis.Dag Normann - 2011 - In S. B. Cooper & Andrea Sorbi (eds.), Computability in Context: Computation and Logic in the Real World. World Scientific. pp. 297.
  49. Theory, Generalisations From Cases and Methodological Maxims in Evidence-Based Economics: Responses to the Reviews by DiNardo, Guala and Kincaid.Julian Reiss - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):93-96.
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  50. Methodology for Experiments Should Be Determined Empirically, Not Philosophically.Don Ross - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):189-193.
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