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  1. Rejoinder: The “Ambiguity Aversion Literature: A Critical Assessment”.Nabil I. Al-Najjar & Jonathan Weinstein - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):357-369.
    The pioneering contributions of Bewley, Gilboa and Schmeidler highlighted important weaknesses in the foundations of economics and game theory. The Bayesian methodology on which these fields are based does not answer such basic questions as what makes beliefs reasonable, or how agents should form beliefs and expectations. Providing the initial impetus for debating these issues is a contribution that will have the lasting value it deserves.
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  2. When Are Inferences Too Fragile to Be Believed?John Aldrich - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):161-177.
    The use of sensitivity analysis is routine in some fields of empirical econometrics, although econometric theorists have generally taken a critical attitude towards it. This paper presents a framework in which arguments for and against such analysis can be evaluated. It appears that sensitivity is not necessarily a bad, nor sturdiness necessarily a good.
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  3. The Experiment in Macroeconometrics.John Aldrich & Anna Staszewska - 2007 - Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (2):143-166.
    This paper examines the experiment in macroeconometrics, the different forms it has taken and the rules that have been proposed for its proper conduct. Here an ?experiment? means putting a question to a model and getting an answer. Different types of experiment are distinguished and the justification that can be provided for a particular choice of experiment is discussed. Three types of macroeconometric modelling are considered: the Cowles (system of equations) approach, the vector autoregressive model approach and the computational experiment. (...)
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  4. Does Economic Theory Need More Evidence? A Balancing of Arguments.Paul Anand - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (4):441-463.
    This article seeks to provide a characterization of theory prevalent in economics and found in many areas of social and natural science, particularly those that make increasing use of rational choice perspectives. Four kinds of theoretical project are identified in which empirical evidence plays a relatively small role in theory acceptance. The paper associates the minor role of evidence in theory formation and acceptance to a need to answer counterfactual questions and argues that is not necessarily incompatible with accounts of (...)
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  5. Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. Yale University Press, 2008. X + 293 Pages. [Paperback Edition, Penguin, 2009, 320 Pages.]. [REVIEW]Joel Anderson - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):369-376.
  6. The Role of Data/Code Archives in the Future of Economic Research.Richard G. Anderson, William H. Greene, B. D. McCullough & H. D. Vinod - 2008 - Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (1):99-119.
    This essay examines the role of data and program?code archives in making economic research ?replicable.? Replication of published results is recognized as an essential part of the scientific method. Yet, historically, both the ?demand for? and ?supply of? replicable results in economics has been minimal. ?Respect for the scientific method? is not sufficient to motivate either economists or editors of professional journals to ensure the replicability of published results. We enumerate the costs and benefits of mandatory data and code archives, (...)
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  7. Why Does the Traditional Distinction Between Internal and External History Not Hold?Roberto Angeloni - 2010 - Epistemologia 33 (1):65-78.
  8. Economists as Experts: Overconfidence in Theory and Practice.Erik Angner - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):1-24.
    Drawing on research in the psychology of judgment and decision making, I argue that individual economists acting as experts in matters of public policy are likely to be victims of significant overconfidence. The case is based on the pervasiveness of the phenomenon, the nature of the task facing economists?as?experts, and the character of the institutional constraints under which they operate. Moreover, I argue that economist overconfidence can have dramatic consequences. Finally, I explore how the negative consequences of overconfidence can be (...)
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  9. The Adjustment of Internal and External Preferences.Miroslava Anđelković - 1993 - Theoria 36 (1):33-50.
  10. Method and Appraisal in Economics.G. C. Archibald - 1979 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (3):304-315.
  11. Exploring the Links Between External and Internal Activity From a Cultural-Historical Perspective.Igor Arievitch - 2008 - In B. van Oers (ed.), The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 38--57.
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  12. The Two Images of Economics: Why the Fun Disappears When Difficult Questions Are at Stake?N. Emrah Aydinonat - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):243-258.
    The image of economics got somewhat puzzling after the crisis of 2008. Many economists now doubt that economics is able to provide answers to some of its core questions. The crisis was not so fun for economics. However, this not so fun image of economics is not the only image in the eyes of the general public. When one looks at economics-made-fun (EMF) books (e.g. Freakonomics, The Undercover Economist, etc.), economics seems to be an explanatory science which is able to (...)
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  13. Neuroeconomics: More Than Inspiration, Less Than Revolution.N. Emrah Aydinonat - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):159-169.
    Gul and Pesendorfer (2008) argue that neuroeconomics is evidentially and explanatorily irrelevant to economics, because neuroeconomics and economics ask different questions and utilize different abstractions. They suggest neuroeconomics is only relevant as a source of inspiration for economists. The present paper accepts their basic premise and asks whether the fact that neuroeconomics and economics ask different questions implies that neuroeconomics is irrelevant. The paper argues that Gul and Pesendorfer overlook some important respects in which neuroeconomics is relevant for economics. First, (...)
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  14. Reaffirming the Englightenment Vision A Review of Edward O. Wilson's Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge.R. E. Backhouse - 2000 - Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (1):153-156.
  15. New Directions in Economics and the Philosophy of Economics? The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics.Roger E. Backhouse - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):305-311.
  16. Reflection Without Rules: Economic Methodology and Contemporary Science Theory, by Wade Hands. Cambridge University Press 2001, XI + 480 Pages. [REVIEW]Roger E. Backhouse - 2004 - Economics and Philosophy 20 (1):234-240.
  17. Symposium: Data Mining.Roger E. Backhouse - 2000 - Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (2):171-277.
  18. An 'Inexact' Philosophy of Economics?Roger E. Backhouse - 1997 - Economics and Philosophy 13 (1):25.
    The Inexact and Separate Science of Economics represents the most ambitious attempt to provide a systematic account of economic methodology since the first edition of Blaug's The Methodology of Economics. As such, it has been the subject of extensive critical commentary. For all the attention it has received, however, some important aspects of the book's thesis have not been developed properly. Two important ones are what might be called, following the terminology used in the experimental economics literature, the ‘framing effect’ (...)
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  19. The Fixation of Economic Beliefs.Roger E. Backhouse - 1994 - Journal of Economic Methodology 1 (1):33-42.
  20. Applying Economics, Using Evidence.Roger E. Backhouse & Matthias Klaes - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):139-144.
    Traditionally, evidence in economics has been seen in the context of theory choice. Much of recent methodological debate on the role of evidence has turned on the recognition that the status and role of evidence is somewhat more involved in economics than the conventional wisdom suggests. Rather than approaching this question in general terms from a starting point of philosophy of science or even science studies, our aim in this introduction to a symposium of articles on evidence in economics is (...)
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  21. Introduction: Is Data Mining a Methodological Problem?Roger E. Backhouse & Mary S. Morgan - 2000 - Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (2):171-181.
    This survey of the symposium papers argues that the problem of data mining should be of interest to both practicing econometricians and specialists in economic methodology. After summarizing some of the main points to arise in the symposium, it draws on recent work in the philosophy of science to point to parallels between data mining and practices engaged in routinely by experimental scientists. These suggest that data mining might be seen in a more positive light than conventional doubts about it (...)
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  22. The Methodology of Macroeconomics.Roger Backhouse & Andrea Salanti - 1999 - Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (2):159-169.
    This paper outlines some of the main methodological issues to arise in macroeconomics, making the case that the methodological issues arising in macroeconomics are just as important as those arising in microeconomics and that they merit more attention. Focusing on the symposium to which it forms the Introduction, the paper discusses three such issues: can macroeconomic theories be tested? Do macroeconomic theories change in response to evidence? Is contemporary macroeconomics in good methodological shape?
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  23. Experimental Economics and the Artificiality of Alteration.Nicholas Bardsley - 2005 - Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (2):239-251.
    A neglected critique of social science laboratories alleges that they implement phenomena different to those supposedly under investigation. The critique purports to be conceptual and so invulnerable to a technical solution. I argue that it undermines some economics designs seeking to implement features of real societies, and counsels more modesty in experimental write?ups. It also constitutes a plausible argument that laboratory economics experiments are necessarily less demonstrative than natural scientific ones. More radical sceptical conclusions are unwarranted.
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  24. Experimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules.Nicholas Bardsley, Robin Cubitt, Graham Loomes, Peter Moffatt, Chris Starmer & Robert Sugden - 2009 - Princeton University Press.
    The authors explore the history of experiments in economics, provide examples of different types of experiments and show that the growing use of experimental methods is transforming economics into an empirical science.
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  25. Addressing Ruben's "Internal and External Perspectives".Martin Beckstein - unknown
  26. Internal and External.Charles R. Beitz - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):225-238.
    James's Fairness in Trade seeks to offer an account of fair trade that is “internal” to an existing practice he describes as “mutual market reliance.” This paper distinguishes several senses of the distinction between “internal” and “external” that occur in the book and asks how, in its various senses, the distinction shapes and influences judgments about the fairness of the practice.
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  27. Prediction or Prophecy? The Boundaries of Economic Foreknowledge and Their Socio-Political Consequences.Gregor Betz - 2006 - DUV.
    Gregor Betz explores the following questions: Where are the limits of economics, in particular the limits of economic foreknowledge? Are macroeconomic forecasts credible predictions or mere prophecies and what would this imply for the way economic policy decisions are taken? Is rational economic decision making possible without forecasting at all?
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  28. Truth Versus Precision in Economics, Mayer Thomas. Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1993.Marina Bianchi - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):145.
  29. Predictability of SOC Systems. Technological Extreme Events.G. Bimonte - 2010 - In Marisa Faggini, Concetto Paolo Vinci, Antonio Abatemarco, Rossella Aiello, F. T. Arecchi, Lucio Biggiero, Giovanna Bimonte, Sergio Bruno, Carl Chiarella, Maria Pia Di Gregorio, Giacomo Di Tollo, Simone Giansante, Jaime Gil Aluja, A. I͡U Khrennikov, Marianna Lyra, Riccardo Meucci, Guglielmo Monaco, Giancarlo Nota, Serena Sordi, Pietro Terna, Kumaraswamy Velupillai & Alessandro Vercelli (eds.), Decision Theory and Choices: A Complexity Approach. Springer Verlag Italia. pp. 221--234.
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  30. Economic Man – or Straw Man?Ken Binmore - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):817-818.
    The target article by Henrich et al. describes some economic experiments carried out in fifteen small-scale societies. The results are broadly supportive of an approach to understanding social norms that is commonplace among game theorists. It is therefore perverse that the rhetorical part of the paper should be devoted largely to claiming that “economic man” is an experimental failure that needs to be replaced by an alternative paradigm. This brief commentary contests the paper's caricature of economic theory, and offers a (...)
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  31. From the Philosophy of Mind to the Philosophy of the Market.Peter J. Boettke & J. Robert Subrick - 2002 - Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):53-64.
    John Searle has argued against the viability of strong versions of artificial intelligence. His most well-known counter-example is the Chinese Room thought experiment where he stressed that syntax is not semantics. We reason by analogy to highlight previously unnoticed similarities between Searle and F.A. Hayek's critique of socialist planning. We extend their insights to explain the failure of many reforms in Eastern Europe in the 1990's.
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  32. Economic Methodology: Understanding Economics as a Science.Ivan A. Boldyrev - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):427-432.
  33. Where is Economic Methodology Going?Jesus P. Zamora Bonilla - 2001 - Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):135-138.
  34. Experiments, Policy, and Theory in Development Economics: A Response to Glenn Harrison’s ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance’.Thomas Bossuroy & Clara Delavallade - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):147-156.
    In ‘Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance,’ Glenn Harrison develops a criticism of randomized field experiments and denounces ‘intolerance’ for lab experiments and a ‘disconnect from theory.’ We argue that lab experiments and RCTs are based on different methodological approaches and therefore fulfill different scientific objectives; key features of the RCT methodology make it highly relevant for policy-making, which accounts for a large part of its uptake; RCTs foster a convergence of interests between policy-makers and researchers around the study of economic (...)
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  35. On the Use and Nonuse of Surveys in Economics.Bryan L. Boulier & Robert S. Goldfarb - 1998 - Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (1):1-21.
    While it is widely alleged that economists do not like or use questionnaire surveys, the facts are considerably more complicated. Economists make extensive use of survey information on such things as prices and employment, and the use of ?contingent valuation? surveys has exploded recently. The paper reviews the historical debate that led to economists? seeming distrust of surveys. It then investigates why there is extensive use of surveys in the face of methodological strictures against survey use. To do this, the (...)
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  36. Methodological Ignorance: A Comment on Field Experiments and Methodological Intolerance.Marcel Boumans - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (2):139-146.
    Glenn Harrison [Journal of Economic Methodology, 2013, 20, 103–117] discusses four related forms of methodological intolerance with respect to field experiments: field experiments should rely on some form of randomization, should be disconnected from theory, the concept of causality should only be defined in terms of observables, and the role of laboratory experiments is dismissed. As is often the case, the cause of intolerance is ignorance, as it is here. To acquire knowledge about potential influences, which we need for both (...)
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  37. Measurement in Economics.Marcel Boumans - 2012 - In Uskali Mäki, Dov M. Gabbay, Paul Thagard & John Woods (eds.), Philosophy of Economics. North Holland. pp. 395.
  38. How to Design Galilean Fall Experiments in Economics.Marcel Boumans - 2003 - Philosophy of Science 70 (2):308-329.
    In the social sciences we hardly can create laboratory conditions, we only can try to find out which kinds of experiments Nature has carried out. Knowledge about Nature's designs can be used to infer conditions for reliable predictions. This problem was explicitly dealt with in Haavelmo's (1944) discussion of autonomous relationships, Friedman's (1953) as-if methodology, and Simon's (1961) discussions of nearly-decomposable systems. All three accounts take Marshallian partitioning as starting point, however not with a sharp ceteris paribus razor but with (...)
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  39. Measurement in Economic Systems.Marcel J. Boumans - unknown
    The metrology literature neglects a strong empirical measurement tradition in economics, which is different from the traditions as accounted for by the formalist representational theory of measurement. This empirical tradition comes closest to Mari's characterization of measurement in which he describes measurement results as informationally adequate to given goals. In economics, one has to deal with soft systems, which induces problems of invariance and of self-awareness. It will be shown that in the empirical economic measurement tradition both problems have been (...)
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  40. Ceteris Paribus Conditions: Materiality and the Application of Economic Theories.Marcel Boumans & Mary S. Morgan - 2001 - Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):11-26.
  41. The Rational-Behavioral Debate in Financial Economics.Alon Brav, J. B. Heaton & Alexander Rosenberg - 2004 - Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (4):393-409.
    The contest between rational and behavioral finance is poorly understood as a contest over 'testability' and 'predictive success.' In fact, neither rational nor behavioral finance offer much in the way of testable predictions of improving precision. Researchers in the rational paradigm seem to have abandoned testability and prediction in favor of a scheme of ex post 'rationalizations' of observed price behavior. These rationalizations, however, have an unemphasized relevance for behavioral finance. While behavioral finance advocates may justly criticize rationalizations as unlikely (...)
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  42. Choosing Justice: An Experimental Approach to Ethical Theory, Frohlich Norman and Joe A. Oppenheimer. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992, Xiv + 258 Pages. [REVIEW]Harry Brighouse - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):127.
  43. Is Endogenous Growth Theory Degenerating? Another Look at Lakatosian Appraisal of Growth Theories.Michal Brzezinski & Michal Dzielinski - 2009 - Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):243-263.
    In a recent paper, Cavusoglu and Tebaldi provided an evaluation of neoclassical and endogenous growth theories according to Lakatos's methodology of scientific research programmes. This paper offers three criticisms of their contribution as well as a rival Lakatosian appraisal of growth theories. First, we hold that Cavusoglu and Tebaldi do not provide a proper structure of theory comparison in their contribution. Second, we argue that they use an inadequate version of Lakatos's appraisal criterion. Third, against the claim of the authors, (...)
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  44. Experimental Validity and Pragmatic Modes in Empirical Science.Maria Caamano Alegre - 2009 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 23 (1):19-45.
    The purpose of this paper is to show how the degree of experimental validity of scientific procedures is crucially involved in determining two typical pragmatic modes in science, namely, the preservation of useful procedures and the disposal of useless ideas. The term 'pragmatic' will here be used following Schurz's characterisation of being internally pragmatic, as referring to that which proves useful for scientific or epistemic goals. The first part of the paper consists in a characterisation of the notion of experimental (...)
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  45. The Continuing Validity of the Marxian Thought.Z. Cackowski - 1998 - Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 60:115-130.
  46. Experimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules, Nicholas Bardsley, Robin Cubitt, Graham Loomes, Peter Moffat, Chris Starmer, and Robert Sugden. Princeton University Press, 2010. Viii + 375 Pages. [REVIEW]Andrew Caplin - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):179-183.
  47. Estimating the Validity of the Guilty Knowledge Test From Simulated Experiments: The External Validity of Mock Crime Studies.David Carmel, Eran Dayan, Ayelet Naveh, Ori Raveh & Gershon Ben-Shakhar - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 9 (4):261.
  48. Reply to Steel and Pearl Hunting Causes and Using Them: Approaches in Philosophy and Economics , Nancy Cartwright. Cambridge University Press, 2008, X + 270 Pages. [REVIEW]Nancy Cartwright - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):87-94.
  49. Evaluating Growth Theories and Their Empirical Support: An Assessment of the Convergence Hypothesis.Nevin Cavusoglu & Edinaldo Tebaldi - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):49-75.
    Understanding the factors determining economic growth has been a major concern for economists and governing bodies for many years. The Solow growth model and the endogenous growth models are the main theories tested and used in the growth literature. This paper discusses the main contributions to economic methodology and uses Lakatos's scientific research program framework to evaluate the main theoretical contributions to growth theory. Based on Lakatos's ideas, Solovian models are both empirically and theoretically progressive. Endogenous growth models, on the (...)
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  50. A Misconception of the Semantic Conception of Econometrics?Hsiang‐Ke Chao - 2005 - Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (1):125-135.
    Davis argues that Suppe's semantic conception provides a better understanding of the problem of theory?data confrontations. Applying his semantic methodology to the LSE (London School of Economics) approach of econometrics, he concludes that the LSE approach fails to address the issue of bridging the theory?data gap. This paper suggests two other versions of the semantic view of theories in the philosophy of science, due to Suppes and van Fraassen, and argues that the LSE approach can be construed under these two (...)
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