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  1. Arne Johan Vetlesen, The Denial of Nature: Environmental Philosophy in the Era of Global Capitalism.Robert H. Scott - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):126-128.
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  2. Eelco Rohling, The Oceans: A Deep History.Sarah Holmes - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):129-130.
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  3. Decolonising Dignity for Inclusive Democracy.Christine J. Winter - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):9-30.
    The idea of dignity is often taken to be a foundation for principles of justice and democracy. In the West it has numerous formulations and conceptualisations. Within the capabilities approach to justice theorists have expanded the concept of dignity to encompass animals and ecological communities. In this article I rework the idea of dignity to include the Māori philosophical concepts of Mauri, tapu and mana – something I argue is necessary if the capabilities approach is to decolonise in the Aotearoa (...)
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  4. Svetozar Y. Monkov and Bernhardt L. Trout Mastery of Nature: Promises and Prospects.Ashley Dodsworth - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):123-125.
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  5. A Cultural Account of Ecological Democracy.Marit Hammond - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):55-74.
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  6. Jonathan A. Newman, Gary Varner and Stefan Linquist, Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics.Ian Lawson - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):131-133.
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  7. Participation in Transnational Environmental Governance: Green Values Versus Instrumental Use.Ayşem Mert - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):101-121.
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  8. Reconciling Ecological and Democratic Values: Recent Perspectives on Ecological Democracy.David Schlosberg, Karin Bäckstrand & Jonathan Pickering - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):1-8.
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  9. Ecological Democracy, Just Transitions and a Political Ecology of Design.Damian F. White - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):31-53.
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  10. Towards a New Ecological Democracy: A Critical Evaluation of the Deliberation Paradigm Within Green Political Theory.Matthew Lepori - 2019 - Environmental Values 28 (1):75-99.
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  11. What Are the Core Ideas Behind the Precautionary Principle?Erik Persson - 2016 - Science of the Total Environment 557:134–141.
    The Precautionary Principle is both celebrated and criticized. It has become an important principle for decision making, but it is also subject to criticism. One problem that is often pointed out with the principle is that is not clear what it actually says and how to use it. I have taken on this problem by performing an analysis of some of the most influential formulations of the principle in an attempt to identify the core ideas behind it, with the purpose (...)
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  12. The Epistemic and Ethical Onus of ‘One Health’.Nicolae Morar & Jonathan Beever - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):185-194.
    This paper argues that the practical reach and ethical impact of the One Health paradigm is conditional on satisfactorily distinguishing between interconnected and interdependent factors among human, non-human, and environmental health. Interconnection does not entail interdependence. Offering examples of interconnections and interdependence in the context of existing One Health literature, we demonstrate that the conversations about One Health do not yet sufficiently differentiate between those concepts. They tend to either ignore such distinctions or embrace bioethically untenable positions. We conclude that (...)
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  13. Conceptualizing Human Stewardship in the Anthropocene: The Rights of Nature in Ecuador, New Zealand and India.Stefan Knauß - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-20.
    In this text I investigate the increasing usage of the Rights of Nature to approach the task of Stewardship for the Earth. The Ecuadorian constitution of 2008 introduces the indigenous concept of Pachamama and interpretes nature as a subject of rights. Reflecting the two 2017 cases of the Whanganui River and the Gangotri and Yamunotri Glaciers, my main argument is that, although the language of individual rights relies on modern subjectivity as well as the constitutionalism of the secular nation state, (...)
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  14. Consumers and Certification Schemes: The Ethics of Global Production and Trade.Scott Brenton - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-30.
    Certification schemes and labels such as the Forest Stewardship Council, Fairtrade, and Rainforest Alliance are market-based mechanisms designed to harness consumer power in economically developed countries to influence companies to improve the economic, social and environmental welfare of producers, workers and communities in economically developing countries. However, consumers are largely not convinced that certification schemes are acting in the interests of developing countries, because consumers have different understandings of the ethics of global trade. Drawing on the results of six semi-structured (...)
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  15. Ethics in Agriculture: Where Are We and Where Should We Be Going?Robert L. Zimdahl & Thomas O. Holtzer - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-3.
    Agriculture’s dominant focus is feeding the human population. From an ethical perspective, this is clearly very positive, but it does not absolve agriculture from critical, ethical examination of the totality of agriculture’s effects. To earn the public’s ongoing support, agriculture must be trusted to vigilantly examine its full range of effects and be sure they align with the highest ethical values. Agriculture’s record is enviable in the science and technology associated with its primary ethical concern, but we need to do (...)
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  16. Environmental Heritage and the Ruins of the Future.Erich Hatala Matthes - forthcoming - In Carolyn Korsmeyer, Jeanette Bicknell & Jennifer Judkins (eds.), Ruins, Monuments, and Memorials: Philosophical Perspectives on Artifact and Memory. Routledge.
    We now have good reason to worry that many coastal cities will be flooded by the end of the century. How should we confront this possibility (or inevitability)? What attitudes should we adopt to impending inundation of such magnitude? In the case of place-loss due to anthropogenic climate change, I argue that there may ultimately be something fitting about letting go, both thinking prospectively, when the likelihood of preservation is bleak, and retrospectively, when we reflect on our inability to prevent (...)
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  17. Autonomous Nature: Problems of Prediction and Control From Ancient Times to the Scientific Revolution.Eric Katz - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):93-94.
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  18. Plant Ethics: Concepts and Applications.Per Sandin - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):95-96.
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  19. From Intrinsic Value to the Emotion of Wonder.Gao Shan - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):81-91.
    Since environmental ethics research started in China in the 1980s, it has been deeply influenced by environmental ethics theory in the United States. Some Chinese environmental philosophers have adopted the key concept of intrinsic value to construct Chinese environmental ethics. However, in recent decades, the concept of intrinsic value has been criticized by scholars in both the United States and China. Many Chinese have found that environmental ethics in the United States that is founded on the concept of intrinsic value (...)
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  20. Confucian Cosmological Life and its Eco-Philosophical Implications.Wang Xiaowei - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):41-56.
    This article discusses a Confucian notion of cosmological life and its eco-philosophical implication. In contrast to the Kantian notion of the man who has exclusive moral worth, existing as the ultimate value-conferrer among beings, Confucian cosmological man understands his/her selfness through the lens of sacred unity with other beings. The modern ecological disaster is arguably caused by the reluctance to recognize the inherent value of nature, which is due to the anthropocentrism partly introduced by the enlightenment notion of humanity. The (...)
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  21. From the Guest Editor.Doug Anderson - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):3-4.
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  22. Why Does a Human, a Mammal, Have to Drink Milk of a Cow, Another Mammal?Song Tian - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):57-79.
    Why Chinese culture has turned to the use of cow’s milk needs to be reexamined. The reason given to the Chinese people is that the drinking of milk is scientifically supported. However, the actual drinking of cow’s milk has been and continues to be problematic for Chinese people since many have lactose intolerance. This problem leads to the larger question of why one might trust science for the answer all issues, especially when science is often working for corporate interests and (...)
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  23. The Intellectual Features and Cultural Backgrounds of Modern Environmental Ethics in China.Li Yingjie & Wang Qian - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):5-20.
    The perception of modern environmental ethics in China has been greatly influenced by two factors: scholarship of environmental ethics in Europe and the United States on the one hand, and ideological resources from traditional Chinese culture on the other. In practice, while Chinese governmental agencies, enterprises, and social organizations are paying more and more attention to the perspective of environmental ethics in technology assessment and social governance, they are still faced with the challenge of a large number of realistic problems. (...)
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  24. Zhuangzi’s Ecological Politics.Liu Yongmou & Wang Hao - 2018 - Environmental Ethics 40 (1):21-39.
    There is a problematic dichotomy of nature/power in Western ecological politics. In this article, we try to argue for a new type of ecological politics, based on Chinese Taoism, especially the idea of Zhuangzi, that can integrate humanity, nature, and power. Zhuangzi’s idea of “play with nature” constitutes a new kind of play-style view of nature. This view not only emphasizes the freedom and pleasure in everyday human practices with nature, but also proposes a way to deconstruct the rigid authority, (...)
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  25. Is Environmental Virtue Ethics Anthropocentric?Dominika Dzwonkowska - forthcoming - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-16.
    Virtue ethics, due to its eudaimonistic character, is very anthropocentric; thus the application of VE to environmental ethics seems to be in contradiction with EE’s critical opinion of human centeredness. In the paper, I prove the claim that there is a possibility of elaborating an environmental virtue ethics that involves others. I prove that claim through analyzing Ronald Sandler’s EVE, especially his concept of pluralistic virtue and a pluralistic approach to the aim of ethical endeavor which is not only focused (...)
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  26. Defending the Defenders: Environmental Protectors, Climate Change and Human Rights.Trish Glazebrook & Emmanuela Opoku - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (2):83.
    Global Witness, an international non-governmental organization founded in 1993 "to end environmental and human rights abuses driven by the exploitation of natural resources and corruption in the global political and economic system", working in collaboration with the British newspaper The Guardian, recorded almost a thousand murders of land and environment defenders between 2010 and 2016. Since at least the beginning of 2016, an average of roughly four environmental defenders a week have been murdered. One hundred and seventeen were killed in (...)
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  27. Anthropocentrism, Logocentrism, and Neural Networks: Victoria Davion Prefigures Some Important Lessons From Nature.Ronnie Hawkins - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (2):37.
    Victoria Davion worked courageously at that growing confluence where feminism and ecological consciousness come together, just as she consistently provided support for others who found themselves drawn by the same set of concerns, values and aspirations. And sometimes one may have a sense where lines of inquiry are heading, well before detailed investigations draw them out into the light of day. I get that feeling from reading her essay "Anthropocentrism, Artificial Intelligence, and Moral Network Theory: An Ecofeminist Perspective". Davion identifies (...)
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  28. Ecofeminist Teaching and Mentoring: Vicky Davion's Legacy.Cecilia Herles - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (2):3.
    While grappling with the loss of Victoria Davion, I have contemplated the meaning of legacy in the academic field of philosophy. A legacy can be measured in the ripple effect of one's actions. As Vicky's former student and graduate assistant, I am grieving, yet I continue to be uplifted by her mentorship and the lessons she taught me. The scope of Vicky Davion's knowledge extends well beyond her written publications and her work as founding editor of this journal, Ethics & (...)
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  29. What's in a Name? In Defense of Ecofeminism : Or “Why Ecofeminism Need Not Be Ecofeminine—But So What If It Is?”.Chaone Mallory - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (2):11.
    As I am composing this piece for this special issue on the life, work, and impact on the field of ecofeminism of pathfinding philosopher Victoria Davion, as well as her incredible impact on the people whose lives she touched, I am gazing out my window in the Eastern Sierra bioregion of California. Normally the view is of the jagged, rocky profile of the Sierra Nevada mountains in sharp relief against a cerulean sky, with Mt. Whitney, which at approximately 14,800 feet (...)
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  30. Introduction.Piers H. G. Stephens - 2018 - Ethics and the Environment 23 (2):1.
    This special issue of Ethics and the Environment is dedicated to the philosophical contributions of our founding editor, Victoria Davion, who launched the journal in 1996 and edited it until shortly before her death in November 2017. Vicky was a pioneering figure in ecofeminist philosophy, as well as being both the first woman to become a full professor and the first to be chair of the Philosophy Department here at the University of Georgia. Naturally we have endeavored to give her (...)
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  31. Henry Bugbee, Edited by David W. Rodick, Wilderness in America: Philosophical Writings.Laura Smith - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):711-712.
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  32. How Demanding is Our Climate Duty? An Application of the No-Harm Principle to Individual Emissions.Augustin Fragnière - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):645-663.
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  33. Grounding Words and Flights of Imagination.Tom Greaves - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):597-601.
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  34. In Search of Allies for Postnatural Environmentalism, or Revisiting an Ecophilosophical Reading of Heidegger.Magdalena Hoły-Łuczaj - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):603-621.
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  35. Milena Buchs and Max Koch, Postgrowth and Wellbeing: Challenges to Sustainable Welfare.Rachel Manning - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):713-715.
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  36. Philip Cafaro, How Many is Too Many? The Progressive Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States.Gerry Nagtzaam - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):716-718.
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  37. Frank Trentmann, Empire of Things: How We Became a World of Consumers, From the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First.Sam Bliss - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):707-710.
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  38. Ecology, Community and Food Sovereignty: What's in a Word?Jade Monaghan & Mick Smith - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):665-686.
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  39. Engaging the Imagination: 'New Nature Writing', Collective Politics and the Environmental Crisis.Kate Oakley, Jonathan Ward & Ian Christie - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):687-705.
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  40. Ronald Sandler, Environmental Ethics: Theory in Practice.Zachary Vereb - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (6):719-721.
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  41. Environmental Stewardship and Ecological Solidarity: Rethinking Social-Ecological Interdependency and Responsibility.Raphaël Mathevet, François Bousquet, Catherine Larrère & Raphaël Larrère - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):605-623.
    This paper explores and discusses the various meanings of the stewardship concept in the field of sustainability science. We highlight the increasing differences between alternative approaches to stewardship and propose a typology to enable scientists and practitioners to more precisely identify the basis and objectives of the concept of stewardship. We first present the two dimensions we used to map the diversity of stances concerning stewardship. Second, we analyse these positions in relation to the limits of the systemic approach, ideological (...)
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  42. The Edge of “Animal Rights”.Yajun Sun - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):543-557.
    A central task of environmental ethics, which have been arising since 1960s, is to extend the objects of moral concern beyond the individuals of Homo sapiens.. On the other hand, if we broadly define the environmental ethic as an ethic that shows moral concern not limited to Homo sapiens and its individuals only, then, these “generalized” environmental ethics include Peter Singer’s “animal liberation” and Tom Regan’s “animal rights”. In this article, the term “environmental ethic” refers to an environmental ethic in (...)
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  43. Technocratic Management Versus Ethical Leadership Redefining Responsible Professionalism in the Agri-Food Sector in the Anthropocene.Vincent Blok - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):583-591.
    In this contribution, we argue that three related developments provide economic, environmental and social challenges and opportunities for a new responsible professionalism in the food chain: the Anthropocene; the bio-based economy; Precision Livestock Farming. These three interrelated developments indicate a transition in the way we understand the role and function of the food chain on the micro-, the meso- and the macro-level. This transition can be understood in two fundamental different ways, namely either as an extension of technocratic management beyond (...)
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  44. Advancing Food Sovereignty Through Interrogating the Question: What is Food Sovereignty?Shane Epting - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):593-604.
    The topic of food sovereignty has received ample attention from philosophers and interdisciplinary scholars, from how to conceptualize the term to how globalization shapes it, and several areas in between. This bounty of research informs us about food sovereignty’s practical dimensions, but the theoretical realm still has lessons to teach us, especially how to develop action-based guides to achieve it. This paper is an exploration in that direction. To have that effect, the author interrogates the question, “what is food sovereignty?”, (...)
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  45. Is There a Relation Between Ecological Practices and Spirituality? The Case of Benedictine Monasteries.Bernhard Freyer, Valentina Aversano-Dearborn, Georg Winkler, Sina Leipold, Harald Haidl, Karl Werner Brand, Michael Rosenberger & Thomas Wallnig - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):559-582.
    For decades there has been a controversial debate over how far religious faith communities are specifically engaged in ecological practices. Therefore we studied four Austrian and two German Benedictine monasteries religious ethics and spirituality as a means of a driving force for initiating EP. We draw upon theories of organizational learning processes and capacity-building of sustainability to interpret our empirical findings. The majority of monasteries are highly engaged in EP, initiated either as an outcome of individual activities or through a (...)
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  46. Predation Catch-22: Disentangling the Rights of Prey, Predators, and Rescuers.Julius Kapembwa - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):527-542.
    Predation poses a serious challenge for animal ethics of whatever ilk. For animal rights theory especially, the problem is potentially fatal as animal rights appear to require or permit interfering in nature to prevent predation, an implication that appears to be absurd. Several philosophers have written to deflect this challenge by showing how that implication is not absurd or how the allegedly entailed prescription to intervene does not follow from animal rights theory. A number of philosophers have taken different routes (...)
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  47. Should Scientific Research Involving Decapod Crustaceans Require Ethical Review?Anthony Rowe - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (5):625-634.
    Decapod crustaceans are faceless animals with five pairs of legs, an external skeleton and multiple nerve centres rather than a single brain. They include common seafood species such as crayfish, crabs, lobsters, prawns and shrimp. These characteristics make them difficult to empathise with and consequently legal protection of decapods ranges from strong, through circumstantial to non-existent. Whether they are capable of experiencing pain depends on definitions and the requirement for absolute proof of an inherently subjective psychological experience. Yet like other (...)
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  48. Situating the Half-Earth Proposal in Distributive Justice: Conditions for Just Conservation.Anna Wienhues - 2018 - Biological Conservation 228 (December 2018):44-51.
    The Half-Earth proposal (or ‘Nature Needs Half’) was put forward as an answer to the current sixth mass extinction crisis on Earth and sparked a debate with disagreement on empirical and normative questions. In this paper I focus on the so far undertheorised normative debate and will provide some conditions that would need to be fulfilled in order for the Half-Earth proposal to serve justice. As I will illustrate, to even begin with situating the Half-Earth proposal within an account of (...)
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  49. Darren F. Speece, Defending Giants: The Redwood Wars and the Transformation of American Environmental Politics.Emily K. Brock - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (1):109-110.
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  50. Paul Raskin, Journey to Earthland:The Great Transition to Planetary Civilization.Mine Islar - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (1):111-112.
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