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  1. Scientific and Ethical Considerations in Rare Species Protection: The Case of Beavers in Connecticut.Frank J. Dirrigl Jr, I. I. I. Holmes Rolston & Joshua H. Wilson - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):121-140.
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  2. Danger in the Rocks? Thinking Through Land Use and Naturally-Occurring Asbestos with Structural Ethics.Shane Epting - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):85-104.
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  3. Preservation of Static Lifeless Landscapes in the Antarctic Dry Valleys and the Atacama Desert and Applications to the Moon and Mars.Christopher P. McKay - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):105-120.
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  4. Daoism and Environmental Philosophy: Nourishing Life by Eric S. Nelson.Dawid Rogacz - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):141-147.
    It is widely observed that Asian traditions of thought contain the conceptual resources for environmental ethics. Most studies have been devoted to Buddhist environmental ethics, but there have also been monographs that examined its presence in Hinduism, Jainism, and Neo-Confucianism. Quite surprisingly, prior to 2020, there had been no book that explored the most radical and consistently non-anthropocentric form of Asian environmental ethics, namely that of the Daoists. Previous studies analyzed Daoist ecology in general and focused on its manifestation in (...)
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  5. Anthropocene Subjectivity and Environmental Degradation.David W. Kidner - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):57-83.
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  6. Locked Into the Anthropocene? Examining the Environmental Ethics of John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.Erika K. Masaki - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):1-19.
  7. The Very Idea of an Ecological Worldview.Keith R. Peterson - 2021 - Ethics and the Environment 26 (1):21-55.
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  8. A Dialogue on the Ethics of Science: Henri Poincaré and Pope Francis.Nicholas Danne - forthcoming - European Journal for Philosophy of Science.
    To teach the ethics of science to science majors, I follow several teachers in the literature who recommend “persona” writing, or the student construction of dialogues between ethical thinkers of interest. To engage science majors in particular, and especially those new to academic philosophy, I recommend constructing persona dialogues from Henri Poincaré’s essay, “Ethics and Science” (1963/1913), and the non-theological third chapter of Pope Francis’s (2015) encyclical on the environment, Laudato si. This pairing of interlocutors offers two advantages. The first (...)
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  9. Unnatural Pumas and Domestic Foxes: Relations with Protected Predators and Conspiratorial Rumours in Southern Chile.Pelayo Benavides & Julián Caviedes - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Human–wildlife conflicts involving protected predators are a major social and environmental problem worldwide. A critical aspect in such conflicts is the role of state institutions regarding predators’ conservation, and how this is construed by affected local populations. These interpretations are frequently embodied in conspiratorial rumours, sharing some common traits related to wild and domestic categories, spatial ordering and power relations. In southern Chile, a one-year, multi-sited ethnographic study of human–animal relations in and adjacent to protected areas was undertaken, foregrounding conspiratorial (...)
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  10. Evidence of Degrowth Values in Food Justice in a Northern Canadian Municipality.Amanda Rooney & Helen Vallianatos - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Our case study draws on emerging ideas of degrowth, showing how degrowth values and strategies may emerge where cities rely heavily on global food systems, and contributes to literature on food for degrowth in local contexts. Degrowth rejects the imperative of economic growth as a primary indicator of social wellness. A holistic understanding of wellness prescribes radical societal transformation, downscaling and decreasing consumption, strengthening community relationships and promoting resilience. Building on Bloemmen et al., we apply a holistic model of degrowth (...)
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  11. What Makes an Environmental Steward? An Individual Differences Approach.Ryan Plummer, Julia Baird & Gillian Dale - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Engaging in environmental stewardship is critical for sustainability. Understanding individual differences and engagement is an important gap in present scholarship and addressing it is necessary to understand individual factors that relate to the types of activities engaged in, motivations and barriers to environmental stewardship. We surveyed 637 Canadian and American adults via Amazon Mechanical Turk, querying a range of demographic, psychological and environmental perceptions factors as well as motivations and barriers to stewardship activities. Respondents were ultimately grouped into Non-Stewards, Home-Oriented (...)
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  12. Plato’s Anthropocentrism Reconsidered.Jorge Torres - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  13. The Ecological Ethics of Nordic Children’s Tales.Nina Witoszek & Martin Lee Mueller - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  14. Public Property, Collective Integrity, and Environmental Justice.Elisabeth Ellis - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):650-656.
  15. Why We Should Stop Using Animal-Derived Products on Patients Without Their Consent.Daniel Rodger - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Medicines and medical devices containing animal-derived ingredients are frequently used on patients without their informed consent, despite a significant proportion of patients wanting to know if an animal-derived product is going to be used in their care. Here, I outline three arguments for why this practice is wrong. Firstly, I argue that using animal-derived medical products on patients without their informed consent undermines respect for their autonomy. Secondly, it risks causing non-trivial psychological harm. Thirdly, it is morally inconsistent to respect (...)
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  16. Plant Philosophy and Interpretation: Making Sense of Contemporary Plant Intelligence Debates.Yogi H. Hendlin - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Plant biologists widely accept plants demonstrate capacities for intelligence. However, they disagree over the interpretive, ethical and nomenclatural questions arising from these findings: how to frame the issue and how to signify the implications. Through the trope of ‘plant neurobiology’ describing plant root systems as analogous to animal brains and nervous systems, plant intelligence is mobilised to raise the status of plants. In doing so, however, plant neurobiology accepts an anthropocentric moral extensionist framework requiring plants to anthropomorphically meet animal standards (...)
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  17. The Personal Responsibility to Reduce Greenhouse Gases in Advance.Benjamin Howe - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  18. Genome Editing in Livestock, Complicity, and the Technological Fix Objection.Katrien Devolder - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (3):1-17.
    Genome editing in livestock could potentially be used in ways that help resolve some of the most urgent and serious global problems pertaining to livestock, including animal suffering, pollution, antimicrobial resistance, and the spread of infectious disease. But despite this potential, some may object to pursuing it, not because genome editing is wrong in and of itself, but because it is the wrong kind of solution to the problems it addresses: it is merely a ‘technological fix’ to a complex societal (...)
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  19. Justice and Ecocide.Manuel Rodeiro - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  20. The Personal Responsibility to Reduce Greenhouse Gases.Benjamin Howe - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  21. Harm, Responsibility, and the Far-Off Impacts of Climate Change.Dan Shahar - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  22. Reciprocity as an Environmental Virtue.Nicholas Geiser - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  23. Virtue Ethics and the Trilemma Facing Sentiocentrism.Rafael Rodrigues Pereira - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  24. Gregory S. McElwain, Mary Midgley: An Introduction.Benjamin Lipscomb - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):390-392.
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  25. Jennifer E. Telesca, Red Gold: The Managed Extinction of the Giant Bluefin Tuna.Gerry Nagtzaam - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):393-395.
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  26. Conceptualising Nature: From Dasgupta to Degrowth.Clive L. Spash - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):265-275.
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  27. John Lauritz Larson, Laid Waste! The Culture of Exploitation in Early America.Brian Allen Drake - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):387-389.
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  28. On (Un)Naturalness.Jan Deckers - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):297-318.
    Many scholars have argued that the distinction between the natural and the unnatural does not have any moral relevance, either because the distinction does not make sense or because, even if it does make sense, it does not make any moral sense. Before we can decide on the latter, we must therefore determine first whether a semantic distinction can be made. In this article, I argue that the distinction can be maintained. In spite of the fact that the categories of (...)
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  29. The Nature of Degrowth: Theorising the Core of Nature for the Degrowth Movement.Pasi Heikkurinen - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):367-385.
    This article investigates human-nature relations in the light of the recent call for degrowth, a radical reduction of matter-energy throughput in over-producing and over-consuming cultures. It outlines a culturally sensitive response to a paradox where humans embedded in nature experience alienation and estrangement from it. The article finds that if nature has a core, then the experienced distance makes sense. To describe the core of nature, three temporal lenses are employed: the core of nature as 'the past', 'the future', and (...)
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  30. The Social Specificity of Societal Nature Relations in a Flexible Capitalist Society.Dennis Eversberg - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):319-343.
    Based on analyses of a 2016 German survey, this article contributes to debates on 'societal nature relations' by investigating the systematic differences between socially specific types of social relations with nature in a flexible capitalist society. It presents a typology of ten different 'syndromes' of attitudes toward social and environmental issues, which are then grouped to distinguish between four ideal types of social relationships with nature: dominance, conscious mutual dependency, alienation and contradiction. These are located in Pierre Bourdieu's social space (...)
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  31. Towards Degrowth? Making Peace with Mortality to Reconnect with (One's) Nature: An Ecopsychological Proposition for a Paradigm Shift.Sarah Koller - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):345-366.
    This article explores the existential conditions for a transition towards socioeconomic degrowth through an analysis of a paradigm shift between two extreme polarities of socio-ecological positioning: the Dominant Social Paradigm and the New Ecological Paradigm. It is suggested that the transition from one to the other - understood as the first collective step towards degrowth - requires a transformation in the way we, in western capitalist society, define ourselves in relation to nature. This identity transformation corresponds with the reconnection between (...)
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  32. The Logic of Modernity and Ecological Crisis.Simon Lumsden - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (3):277-296.
    This paper examines the theory of sustainable development presented by Jeffrey Sachs in The Age of Sustainable Development. While Sustainable Development ostensibly seeks to harmonise the conflict between ecological sustainability and human development, the paper argues this is impossible because of the conceptual frame it employs. Rather than allowing for a re-conceptualisation of the human-nature relation, Sustainable Development is simply the latest and possibly last attempt to advance the core idea of western modernity — the notion of self-determination. Drawing upon (...)
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  33. Integrity and Agency.Christopher Preston & Trine Antonsen - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  34. Radical Virtue and Climate Action.Benjamin Hole - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
    Radical virtue serves two distinct purposes: consolation in unfavorable circumstances, and prescription to achieve better ones. This paper maps out the theoretical nuances important for practical guidance. For a Stoic, radical virtue is a way to live well through environmental tragedy. For a consequentialist, it is an instrument to motivate us to combat climate change. For an Aristotelian, it is both. I argue that an Aristotelian approach fares the best, balancing the aim of external success with the aim of living (...)
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  35. Nourishing Bonds.Katharine Wolfe - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  36. Cultural Roots for the Evolution of Wilderness and the Anxieties of Urban Living.Yuling Che & Feifei Duan - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):267-278.
    Space being the precondition for human existence, human perception and experience vary responding to different spaces. Modern urban dwellers live in urban space where they seem to have much space mobility but end up living in a homogenized concrete jungle. This fact has influenced, if not defined, modern urban dwellers’ life experience and caused their anxieties about such an existence. However, wilderness, as opposed to urban space, is not merely a type of space, but a way of existence relating to (...)
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  37. The Re-Enchantment of Wilderness and Urban Aesthetics.Wang-Heng Chen & Xin-yu Chen - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):213-221.
    According to the essence of industrial civilization, wilderness is bound to disenchantment. However, in the ecological civilization era, based on the demands of ecological balance, we must reserve a certain degree of wilderness in urban environment. Therefore, we need to bring back enchantment to aesthetic appreciation of wilderness. On the surface, the re-enchantment of wilderness seems to be a regression of agricultural civilization; however, in fact, it is a transcendental development of agricultural civilization. In recent years, there have been some (...)
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  38. Wilderness in Ancient Chinese Landscape Painting.LuYang Chen & Ziao Chen - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):253-266.
    Chinese painting is dominated by landscape painting, which is a unique form of artistic expression for Chinese people, while landscape generally refers to nature. Wild natural landscape can be called “wilderness,” which embodies the vitality and upward vitality of nature, and also contains unique cultural characteristics. “Wilderness” is the most important “original ecological” environment in the natural environment. Its existence has natural, ecological, and aesthetic significance. It is nature in its primitiveness and ecology in its wildness; the aesthetic lives on (...)
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  39. Wilderness Spirit and Ecological Self in the Vision of Ecopsychology.Yanqiu Hu & Xiaotao Zhou - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):279-288.
    Ecopsychology holds that a full-fledged self should be in harmony with nature, but when the human’s social self, consumptive false self, and paranoid cultural narcissism prevail, the ecological self goes from dominant existence to recessive existence. Because of this predicament with regard to the ecological self, one should make full use of wildness spirit to reshape the ecological self. Due to the abstract nature of the wilderness spirit and in an attempt to present the wilderness spirit in a more concrete (...)
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  40. Nature, Wilderness, and Supreme Goodness.Shan Gao - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):237-251.
    Transcendentalism and Confucianism involve different understandinsgs of the concepts of nature, wilderness, and supreme goodness in terms of the metaphysical understanding of nature and how it influences the understanding of human nature. The goodness of Tao is not transcendental as understood by transcendentalism. Rather the goodness of Tao as the important moral values is shaped by human beings’ experience of the natural world. It is this deeper philosophical reason why transcendentalism encourages the aesthetic appreciation of wilderness while Confucianism encourages the (...)
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  41. The Paradigm of the Wild, Cultural Diversity, and Chinese Environmentalism.Yuedi Liu - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):223-235.
    The so-called “Paradigm of the Wild” means either environmental ethics or environmental aesthetics has gone wild. According to Holmes Rolston, III, “philosophy has gone wild.” Chinese traditional environmentalism takes another anthropocosmic way, and it has a global applicability in cultural diversity. The dichotomy of “nature-culture” is already out of date, and humans have to face the new relation of humanized-nature today. From the perspec­tive of “ethics and aesthetics” in Chinese Confucianism, a different passageway between environmental ethics and environmental aesthetics can (...)
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  42. Nature, Wilderness, and Civilization.Shan Gao - 2020 - Environmental Ethics 42 (3):211-212.
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  43. Experiencing Values in the Flow of Events: A Phenomenological Approach to Relational Values.Christophe Gilliand - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    This paper explores the notion of ‘relational values’ from a phenomenological point of view. In the first place, it stresses that in order to make full sense of relational values, we need to approach them through a relational ontology that surpasses dualistic descriptions of the world structured around the subject and the object. With this aim, the paper turns to ecophenomenology’s attempt to apprehend values from a first-person perspective embedded in the lifeworld, where our entanglement with other beings is not (...)
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  44. Veganism, Moral Motivation and False Consciousness.Susana Pickett - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (3):1-21.
    Despite the strength of arguments for veganism in the animal rights literature, alongside environmental and other anthropocentric concerns posed by industrialised animal agriculture, veganism remains only a minority standpoint. In this paper, I explore the moral motivational problem of veganism from the perspectives of moral psychology and political false consciousness. I argue that a novel interpretation of the post-Marxist notion of political false consciousness may help to make sense of the widespread refusal to shift towards veganism. Specifically, the notion of (...)
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  45. Global Climate Change and Aesthetics.Emily Brady - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    What kinds of issues does the global crisis of climate change present to aesthetics, and how will they challenge the field to respond? This paper argues that a new research agenda is needed for aesthetics with respect to global climate change and outlines a set of foundational issues which are especially pressing: attention to environments that have been neglected by philosophers, for example, the cryosphere and aerosphere; negative aesthetics of environment, in order to grasp aesthetic experiences, meanings, and dis/values in (...)
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  46. Heterotopia as an Environmental and Political Concept: The Case of Hannah Arendt’s Philosophy.Urszula Lisowska - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    The paper offers a new model of politics adequate for the Anthropocene epoch. It uses the concept of ‘heterotopia’ to argue for the environmental potential of Arendtian political philosophy. The adopted meaning of heterotopia combines its Foucauldian and medical sources. It is argued that, thus understood, the concept can be applied to the Arendtian idea of judgment. In this capacity, the concept of heterotopia is both politically foundational and environmentally relevant. It helps us maintain the idea of politics as humanely (...)
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  47. Climate Change, Distributive Justice, and “Pre‐Institutional” Limits on Resource Appropriation.Colin Hickey - 2021 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (1):215-235.
    In this paper I argue that individuals are, prior to the existence of just institutions requiring that they do so, bound as a matter of global distributive justice to restrict their use, or share the benefits fairly of any use beyond their entitlements, of the Earth’s capacity to absorb greenhouse gases (EAC) to within a specified justifiable range. As part of the search for an adequate account of climate morality, I approach the task by revisiting, and drawing inspiration from, two (...)
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  48. Ethical Evaluation Capacity of Turkish Food and Agricultural Engineers and Veterinary Physicians with Regard to Agriculture and Food System.Sukru Keles, Ayşe Kurtoğlu, Özdal Köksal, Neyyire Yasemin Yalım & Cemal Taluğ - 2021 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 34 (2):1-25.
    In Turkey, the numbers of studies that deal with agriculture and food as a system and process, and that address the issue with an integrated approach are very limited. Besides, there is no empirical study available in the national literature in which agricultural and food system has been analyzed within the framework of applied ethics. The present study aims to investigate the characteristics of food and agricultural engineers and veterinary physicians in terms of their tendency to carry out ethical evaluations (...)
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  49. Rescaling the Weather Experience: From an Object of Aesthetics to a Matter of Concern.Madelina Diaconu - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    This paper analyses the cluster of aesthetic features involved in the common experience of the weather. Perceptual features are accompanied by ‘atmospheric’ moods that are irreducible to physiological well-being. Representation and imagination reach their limits due to the more-than-human spatiotemporal scale of the atmosphere. Finally, some ‘transaesthetic’ aspects include the agency of an active matter and the longing for an elemental alterity. The aesthetics of the weather has to account for the interdependence between aesthetic and ethical values, between bodily engagement (...)
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  50. Releasing Education Into the Wild: An Education in, and of, the Outdoors.Claire Skea & Amanda Fulford - 2021 - Ethics and Education 16 (1):74-90.
    ABSTRACT This paper considers the recent growth in different kinds of learning outside the classroom, especially Forest Schools. It shows how the activities associated with Forest Schools often involve mainstream curriculum content delivered in outdoor settings, with a focus on developing skills and attitudes that can be utilised when back in the classroom. Drawing on the works of Henry David Thoreau and Anna Shepherd, we suggest that there is an important distinction to be made between an education in the outdoors, (...)
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