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  1. The Norwegian Petroleum Fund: Savings for Future Generations?Marianne Takle - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    The Norwegian state-owned Petroleum Fund’s market value is more than one trillion US dollars, and the Norwegian state has become one of the world’s largest stockowners. The Fund was established in 1990 and in 2006 and renamed the ‘Government Pension Fund Global’, as savings for future generations. What kind of values form the basis for describing the Petroleum Fund in this way? This article shows that the idea that present generations should not empty the North Sea of oil and gas (...)
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  2. Incorporating User Values Into Climate Services.Wendy Parker & Greg Lusk - 2019 - Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society 100 (9):1643-1650.
    Increasingly there are calls for climate services to be “co-produced” with users, taking into account not only the basic information needs of users but also their value systems and decision contexts. What does this mean in practice? One way that user values can be incorporated into climate services is in the management of inductive risk. This involves understanding which errors in climate service products would have particularly negative consequences from the users’ perspective (e.g., underestimating rather than overestimating the change in (...)
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  3. Biophilia.Christopher Kirby - 2011 - In R. K. Rasmussen (ed.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Issues.
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  4. Benjamin Hale: The Wild and the Wicked: On Nature and Human Nature.Charles Hayes - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):287-288.
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  5. Ecocide or Environmental Self-Destruction?Sandra Baquedano Jer - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):237-247.
    The anthropocentric destruction of nature can be viewed as a form of self-destruction, which affects individuals and also the human species. It entails active destruction of the natural surroundings that are vital for the preservation of the planet’s biodiversity. But should ecocide, or environmental self-destruction of the life of certain species, be considered an “interruption” to the life of such species, or it is part of their natural life course? Are ecocide and environmental destruction identical, or substantively different, phenomena? Prevention (...)
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  6. Taxonomic Chauvinism, No More!Ricardo Rozzi - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):249-282.
    The culture of global society commonly associates the word animal with vertebrates. Paradoxically, most of animal diversity is composed of small organisms that remain invisible in the global culture and are underrepresented in philosophy, science, and education. Twenty-first century science has revealed that many invertebrates have consciousness and the capacity to feel pain. These discoveries urge animal ethicists to be more inclusive and to reevaluate the participation of invertebrates in the moral community. Science also has warned of the disappearance of (...)
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  7. Should We Engineer Species in Order to Save Them?Ronald Sandler - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):221-226.
    There are two strategies for engineering species for conservation purposes, de-extinction and gene drives. Engineering species for conservation purposes is not in principle wrong, and on common criteria for assessing conservation interventions there may well be cases in which de-extinction and gene drives are evaluated positively in comparison to other possible strategies. De-extinction is not as transformative a conservation technique as it initially appears. It is largely dependent, as a conservation activity, upon traditional conservation practices, such as captive breeding programs, (...)
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  8. Daniel Edward Callies: Climate Engineering: A Normative Perspective.Patrick Taylor Smith - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):283-286.
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  9. Motivating (or Baby-Stepping Toward) a Global Constitutional Convention for Future Generation.Stephen M. Gardiner - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):199-220.
    Recently, I have been arguing for a global constitutional convention focused on protecting future generations. This deliberative body would be akin to the American constitutional convention of 1787, which gave rise to the present structure of government in the United States. It would confront the “governance gap” that currently exists surrounding concern for future generations. In particular, contemporary institutions tend to crowd out intergenerational concern, and thereby facilitate a “tyranny of the contemporary.” They not only fail to address a basic (...)
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  10. Introduction to This Special Issue.Eric Pommier & Luca Valera - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):197-198.
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  11. Environmental Philosophies' Inter-Continental Dialogues.Ricardo Rozzi, Alexandria Poole & Francisca Massardo - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (3):195-196.
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  12. Everyday Life Ecologies: Crisis, Transitions and the Aesth-Etics of Desire.Alice dal Gobbo - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Everyday life practices are one of the focuses of interest for so-called ‘sustainable transitions’. Efforts in making daily life more ecological have ranged from awareness-raising and behaviour change strategies to socio-technical innovations, but have produced limited results so far. In a present characterised by a prolonged and multifaceted crisis it is imperative that, as social scientists, we interrogate the sustainability of everyday practices from a more critical angle, linking them to reflections about capitalism’s ecological destructiveness. One fruitful way of doing (...)
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  13. Morality and the Environmental Crisis by Roger Gottlieb.Madronna Holden - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):85-92.
    Roger Gottlieb's Morality and the Environmental Crisis is a philosophical overview of the choices that will shape our grandchildren's lives, as dramatized in his speculative sketch of two very different futures at the end of this book. Gottlieb more than once notes that he is in his seventh decade of life, appropriately designating this work as that of an elder passing on the knowledge derived from his long career as a scholar, teacher, activist linking environmentalist with spiritual communities, and the (...)
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  14. Anthropocentrism, Conservatism and Green Political Thought.Michael Hemmingsen - 2016 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Nature of Peace and the Peace of Nature. Leiden: pp. 81-90.
    In this paper I will examine a number of justifications for environmental concern, and show why all except for the (broadly) anthropocentric demonstrate problematic conservative logics that incline them towards socially conservative positions. Environmentalists would do best to take up an anthropocentric, or at least anthropogenic, defence of green values if they want to pair it with a progressive social politics.
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  15. Extending the Concept of Wilderness Beyond Planet Earth.Alan R. Johnson - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):69.
    The concept of wilderness has been variously conceived at different times and by different individuals. For some, wilderness has been viewed as a source of evil, or at least of chaos, which rightfully should be tamed or subdued, made subject to the controlling influence of human civilization. This attitude typically prevails in frontier or colonizing societies. Alternatively, wilderness has been viewed as a source of positive values, ranging from material resources, wildlife habitat, scientific interest, recreational opportunities, beauty, personal inspiration and (...)
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  16. Dwelling in the Anthropocene: Notes From Lake Superior.Joshua Trey Barnett & David Charles Gore - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):19.
    Some earth scientists reckon our current geological epoch as the Holocene, a mild, perhaps interglacial period, in which fluctuations in the earth's temperatures have been hospitable to human beings. The Holocene witnessed advancements in agriculture, writing, technological and tool development, historical awareness, and civilizational and urban expansion. There is, however, an emerging recognition that Homo sapiens have become a planetary force in our own right through the technological, carbon-based economies that have flourished throughout the Holocene. This recognition has prompted the (...)
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  17. The Status of Canyons and the Quest for Conservation.Jane Duran - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):7.
    Much of the contemporary work on preservation centers on the ecosphere in the sense of its biological diversity: that is, much of it centers on plant and animal species, and their place within the surrounding areas, both from the standpoint of reproduction and that of the food chain. But an increasing number of lines of argument have been made about other parts of the planet's surface, and the special importance that might attach to rare areas—areas that in their overall structure (...)
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  18. Reflecting Back, Looking Forward: Ethics and the Environment at 25.Lori Gruen - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):3.
    Twenty-five years ago, when Ethics and the Environment launched, I remember having engaging conversations with the late founding editor, Victoria Davion, about just how important feminist thinking was to ethical explorations of our vexed relationships with the more than human world. She promised to promote feminist philosophical scholarship in this journal and she kept that promise. Although I'm quite skeptical of "metrics" I did a search on the term "feminism" in the three prominent journals that publish on ethics and the (...)
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  19. Who Loves Rats? A Renewed Plea for the Managed Relocations of Endangered Species.Eleni Panagiotarakou - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):51.
    In 2016 a mouse-like creature by the name of Bramble Cay Melomys or Melomys rubicola went extinct.1 It was the "first recorded mammalian extinction due to anthropogenic climate change". The Bramble Cay Melomys lived in a small, reef island composed of coral rubble and sand that is part of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The report, which made headlines in the global media, described a domino-like chain of events that resulted in the Bramble Cay Melomys becoming extinct. According to (...)
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  20. Ethics & the Environment 25th Anniversary Issue: Introduction From the Editor.Piers H. G. Stephens - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (1):1.
    At the time that Vicky Davion conceived of and launched Ethics and the Environment twenty-five years ago, environmental philosophy was still struggling for acceptance and respectability as a philosophical subdiscipline. For most of the period since 1979 just one journal, Environmental Ethics, had been the primary beacon of the field, and a second, the United Kingdom-based Environmental Values, had only started up in 1992. Much of the surrounding professional atmosphere at the time was less than congenial, especially in relation to (...)
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  21. The Good, the Wild, and the Native: An Ethical Evaluation of Ecological Restoration, Native Landscaping, and the ‘Wild Ones’ of Wisconsin.Laura M. Hartman & Kathleen M. Wooley - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    Ecological restoration and native landscaping are increasing, particularly in the American Midwest, where they form part of the area’s history and culture of conservation. But practitioners rarely pause to ask philosophical questions related to categories of native and invasive or human control and harmony with nature. This article brings philosophy into conversation with practice, using members of Wild Ones Native Landscaping, a non-profit headquartered in Neenah, WI, as a case study. Philosophers and ethicists who are studying Ecological Restoration and Native (...)
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  22. Art History, Natural History and the Aesthetic Interpretation of Nature.David T. Schwartz - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    This paper examines Allen Carlson’s influential view that knowledge from natural science offers the best framework for aesthetically appreciating nature for what it is in itself. Carlson argues that knowledge from the natural sciences can play a role analogous to the role of art-historical knowledge in our experience of art by supplying categories for properly ‘calibrating’ one’s sensory experience and rendering more informed aesthetic judgments. Yet, while art history indeed functions this way, Carlson’s formulation leaves out a second role played (...)
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  23. David N. Pellow, What is Critical Environmental Justice?Gareth A. S. Edwards - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):385-386.
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  24. Alison Stone, Nature, Ethics and Gender in German Romanticism and Idealism.Sebastian Rand - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):382-384.
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  25. Behaviour, Lockdown and the Natural World.Norman Dandy - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):253-259.
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  26. Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Arturo Escobar, Federico Demaria and Albert Acosta (Eds), Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary.Costas Panayotakis - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):379-381.
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  27. Global Convergence and National Disparities in the Structure of Environmental Attitudes and Their Linkage to Pro-Environmental Behaviours.Hui-Ju Kuo & Yang-Chih Fu - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):261-291.
    Although similar environmental issues are present across the globe, residents of different countries vary in the extent to which they are concerned about and act upon these issues. Drawing on data from the 2010 Environment module of the International Social Survey Programme, this study tests the structural comparability of environmental attitudes across 32 countries and examines how pro-environmental behaviours are linked to relevant attitudes. A confirmatory factor analysis from structural equation modelling helps identify three latent constructs of environmental attitudes: willingness (...)
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  28. What Counts as Success? Wider Implications of Achieving Planning Permission in a Low-Impact Ecovillage.Fiona Shirani, Christopher Groves, Karen Henwood, Nick Pidgeon & Erin Roberts - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):339-359.
    The need for energy system change in order to address the energy 'trilemma' of security, affordability and sustainability is well documented and requires the active involvement of individuals, families and communities who currently engage with these systems and technologies. Alongside technical developments designed to address these challenges, alternative ways of living are increasingly being envisaged by those involved in low-impact development. This article draws on data from a qualitative longitudinal study involving residents of a low-impact ecovillage in West Wales, UK, (...)
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  29. Mapping Moral Pluralism in Behavioural Spillovers: A Cross-Disciplinary Account of the Multiple Ways in Which We Engage in Moral Valuing.Michael Vincent & Ann-Kathrin Koessler - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):293-315.
    In this article, we reflect critically on how moral actions are categorised in some recent studies on moral spillovers. Based on classic concepts from moral philosophy, we present a framework to categorise moral actions. We argue that with a finer classification of moral values, associated behaviour is better understood, and this understanding helps to identify the conditions under which moral licensing takes place. We illustrate our argument with examples from the literature on pro-environmental behaviours. Moral spillovers are frequently studied in (...)
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  30. Pathways From Environmental Ethics to Pro-Environmental Behaviours? Insights From Psychology.Chelsea Batavia, Jeremy T. Bruskotter & Michael Paul Nelson - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (3):317-337.
    Though largely a theoretical endeavour, environmental ethics also has a practical agenda to help humans achieve environmental sustainability. Environmental ethicists have extensively debated the grounds, contents and implications of our moral obligations to nonhuman nature, offering up different notions of an 'environmental ethic' with the presumption that, if humans adopt such an environmental ethic, they will then engage in less environmentally damaging behaviours. We assess this presumption, drawing on psychological research to discuss whether or under what conditions an environmental ethic (...)
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  31. Aesthetics at the Intersection of the Species Problem and De-Extinction Technology.Michael Aaron Lindquist - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    De-extinction technology aims to bring extinct species back into existence, often with the goal of releasing created organisms into natural environments. In this paper, I argue that there are aesthetic reasons to avoid engaging in de-extinction and release projects, even if they pass moral permissibility criteria. The strength of these reasons depends on conclusions regarding species authenticity – a problem that arises at the intersection of de-extinction technology and the ‘species problem’ in the philosophy of biology. Since species authenticity affects (...)
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  32. Institutional Context, Political-Value Orientation and Public Attitudes Towards Climate Policies: A Qualitative Follow-Up Study of an Experiment.Marianne Aasen & Arild Vatn - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    In this paper, we are interested in the effects of institutional context on public attitudes towards climate policies, where institutions are defined as the conventions, norms and formally sanctioned rules of any given society. Building on a 2014 survey experiment, we conducted thirty qualitative interviews with car-owners in Oslo, Norway, to investigate the ways in which institutional context and political-value orientation affect public attitudes towards emissions policies. One context highlighted individual rationality, emphasising the ways in which local pollution impacts the (...)
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  33. Partha Dasgupta. Time and the Generations: Population Ethics for a Diminishing Planet. New York: Columbia University Press. 2019. 344 Pages. $28. [REVIEW]C. Tyler DesRoches - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  34. Eileen Crist: Abundant Earth: Toward an Ecological Civilization. [REVIEW]J. Spencer Atkins - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):189-192.
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  35. Donna Haraway: Staying with the Trouble: Makng Kin in the Chthulucene.Konrad Ott - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):185-188.
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  36. Existence Value, Preference Satisfaction, and the Ethics of Species Extinction.Espen Dyrnes Stabell - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):165-180.
    Existence value refers to the value humans ascribe to the existence of something, regard­less of whether it is or will be of any particular use to them. This existence value based on preference satisfaction should be taken into account in evaluating activities that come with a risk of species extinction. There are two main objections. The first is that on the preference satisfaction interpretation, the concept lacks moral importance because satisfying people’s preferences may involve no good or well-being for them. (...)
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  37. Human Edibility, Ecological Embodiment.Christopher Cohoon - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):143-163.
    In her analyses of human ecological alienation, Val Plumwood implies that the recalcitrant problem of human exceptionalism is sustained in part by a kind of imaginative failure, by a certain blind spot to the ecological edibility of the human body. Among the many assumptions responsible for the blind spot, Plumwood suggests, is the liberal conception of the body as something proprietary, as something one owns. Plumwood’s work therefore establishes a new, if counterintuitive, task for environmental philosophy: to find or create (...)
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  38. James S. J. Schwartz and Tony Milligan, Eds.: The Ethics of Space Exploration.Erik Persson - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):181-184.
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  39. Is There Common Ground Between Anthropocentrists and Nonanthropocentrists?Juan Pablo Hernández Betancur - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):99-114.
    Despite the fact that their disagreement concerns the most basic metaethical and metaphysical questions regarding our relation to nature, it has become apparent that many anthropocentrists share with nonanthropocentrists a concern for the environment for its own sake, that is to say, a noninstrumental concern for nature. This concern is also present in practical spheres of environmental engagement. With regard to the philosophical task of justifying the claim that we ought to protect nature, this concern imposes on those that share (...)
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  40. Nature’s Indifference.Simon P. James - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):115-128.
    Contrary to what writers such as Hans Jonas and Val Plumwood suggest, much of nature is indifferent to human interests. Mountains, glaciers, sun-baked salt pans—such entities care neither about what interests us humans nor about what is objectively in our interests. It might be hard to see how the property of being indifferent, in this sense, could add value. But it can. For those of us who inhabit highly technological, user-friendly environments, entities such as mountains can have therapeutic value precisely (...)
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  41. Problem Animals.Anna Peterson - 2019 - Environmental Ethics 41 (2):129-141.
    Nonhuman animals play various roles in environmental ethics, often as charismatic symbols of wilderness or active participants in the natural dramas we seek to preserve. Sometimes, however, nonhuman animals do not fit into—and may even threaten—the “nature” that we value. There are two especially problematic animals: white-tailed deer and feral cats. Together, these creatures shine light on a number of important issues in environmental ethics, including the tensions between animal welfare and environmentalism, the ways human interests and categories pervade even (...)
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  42. Climate Ethics with an Ethnographic Sensibility.Derek Bell & Joanne Swaffield - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (32):611-632.
    What responsibilities does each of us have to reduce or limit our greenhouse gas emissions? Advocates of individual emissions reductions acknowledge that there are limits to what we can reasonably demand from individuals. Climate ethics has not yet systematically explored those limits. Instead, it has become popular to suggest that such judgements should be ‘context-sensitive’ but this does not tell us what role different contextual factors should play in our moral thinking. The current approach to theory development in climate ethics (...)
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  43. What Shall We Eat? An Ethical Framework for Well-Grounded Food Choices.Anna T. Höglund - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):283-297.
    In production and consumption of food, several ethical values are at stake for different affected parties and value conflicts in relation to food choices are frequent. The aim of this article was to present an ethical framework for well-grounded decisions on production and consumption of food, guided by the following questions: Which are the affected parties in relation to production and consumption of food? What ethical values are at stake for these parties? How can conflicts between the identified values be (...)
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  44. Ethical Decision-Making in Zoonotic Disease Control.Joost van Herten, Suzanne Buikstra, Bernice Bovenkerk & Elsbeth Stassen - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):239-259.
    To tackle zoonotic disease threats, a One Health approach is currently commonplace and generally understood as an integrated effort of multiple disciplines to promote the health of humans, animals and the environment. To implement One Health strategies in zoonotic disease control, many countries set up early warning systems, in which human and veterinary health professionals cooperate. These systems, like the Dutch Zoonoses Structure, can be successful to detect emerging disease threats. However, these systems are not well equipped to handle moral (...)
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  45. Quantifying the Valuation of Animal Welfare Among Americans.Scott T. Weathers, Lucius Caviola, Laura Scherer, Stephan Pfister, Bob Fischer, Jesse B. Bump & Lindsay M. Jaacks - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):261-282.
    There is public support in the United States and Europe for accounting for animal welfare in national policies on food and agriculture. Although an emerging body of research has measured animals’ capacity to suffer, there has been no specific attempt to analyze how this information is interpreted by the public or how exactly it should be reflected in policy. The aim of this study was to quantify Americans’ preferences about farming methods and the suffering they impose on different species to (...)
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  46. Cooperation with Animals? What Is and What Is Not.Federico Zuolo - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):315-335.
    The idea of cooperation has been recently used with regard to human–animal relations to justify the application of an associative theory of justice to animals. In this paper, I discuss some of these proposals and seek to provide a reformulation of the idea of cooperation suitable to human–animal relations. The standard idea of cooperation, indeed, presupposes mental capacities that probably cannot be found in animals. I try to disentangle the idea of cooperation from other cognate notions and distinguish it from (...)
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  47. The Ethical Assessment of Touch Pools in Aquariums by Means of the Ethical Matrix.Pierfrancesco Biasetti, Daniela Florio, Claudia Gili & Barbara de Mori - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):337-353.
    Touch pools are popular open-topped fish tanks often found in aquariums where visitors may interact with animals, by touching and sometimes even feeding them, for educational and recreational purposes. However, although animal interactions are becoming increasingly popular in recent years, the welfare impact on the animals and the educational effectiveness of such interactions is under debate. Awareness concerning the different, and sometimes controversial, aspects connected with such interactions has spread. The aim of this paper is to investigate the ethical issues (...)
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  48. Just Food: Why We Need to Think More About Decoupled Crop Subsidies as an Obligation to Justice.Samuel Pierce Gordon - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):355-367.
    In this article I respond to the obligation to institute the policy of decoupled crop subsidies as is provided in Pilchman’s article “Money for Nothing: Are decoupled Crop Subsidies Just?” With growing problems of poor nutrition in the United States there have been two different but related phenomenon that have appeared. First, the obesity epidemic that has ravaged the nation and left an increasing number of people very unhealthy; and second, the phenomenon of food deserts where individuals are unable to (...)
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  49. Wildlife Ethics and Practice: Why We Need to Change the Way We Talk About ‘Invasive Species’.Meera Iona Inglis - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):299-313.
    This article calls for an end to the use of the term ‘invasive species’, both in the scientific and public discourse on wildlife conservation. There are two broad reasons for this: the first problem with the invasive species narrative is that this demonisation of ‘invasives’ is morally wrong, particularly because it usually results in the unjust killing of the animals in question. Following on from this, the second problem is that the narrative is also incoherent, both from scientific and philosophical (...)
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  50. Welfare of Foxes and Earthdogs Used in Den Trials in Countries of the Visegrad Group.Renata Karolova, Daniela Takacova, Peter Lazar, Adriana Iglodyova, Ladislav Takac & Adam Rogers - 2020 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 33 (2):219-237.
    The purpose of den trials is to assess innate ability and preparedness of dachshunds and terriers to work in natural beds in order to control fox numbers. International earthdog trials within the period 2009–2018 were evaluated in Slovakia, in which 1812 dogs participated, of which terriers represented 61.36% and dachshunds 38.64%. Depending on the way of work, dogs of these breeds work as bayer, bolter or hard dog. The test rules were compared in terms of animal protection, principles of ethics (...)
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