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  1. Human Rights and Rights of Nature: Prospects for a Linkage Argument.Daniel P. Corrigan - 2021 - In Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen (eds.), Rights of Nature: A Re-examination. Routledge. pp. 101-120.
  2. Rights of Nature: A Re-Examination.Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    Rights of nature is an idea that has come of age. In recent years, a diverse range of countries and jurisdictions have adopted these norms, which involve granting legal rights to nature or natural objects, such as rivers, forests, or ecosystems. This book critically examines the idea of natural objects as right-holders, and analyses legal cases, policies, and philosophical issues relating to this development. -/- Drawing on contributions from a range of experts in the field, Rights of Nature: A Re-examination (...)
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  3. Rights of Nature: Exploring the Territory.Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen - 2021 - In Daniel P. Corrigan & Markku Oksanen (eds.), Rights of Nature: A Re-examination. Routledge. pp. 1-13.
  4. Republican Environmental Rights.Ashley Dodsworth - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (5):710-724.
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  5. What's So Good About Environmental Human Rights?: Constitutional Versus International Environmental Rights.Daniel P. Corrigan - 2017 - In Markku Oksanen and Ashley Dodsworth and Selina O'Doherty (ed.), Environmental Human Rights: A Political Theory Perspective. New York: Routledge. pp. 124-148.
    In recent decades, environmental rights have been increasingly developed at both the national and international level, along with increased adjudication of such rights in both national (constitutional) courts and international human rights courts. This raises a question as to whether it is better to develop and adjudicate environmental rights at the national or international level. This article considers the case made by James May and Erin Daly in favor of developing environmental rights at the national constitutional level and adjudicating such (...)
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  6. The Right to Parent and Duties Concerning Future Generations.Anca Gheaus - 2016 - Journal of Political Philosophy 24 (1):487-508.
    Several philosophers argue that individuals have an interest-protecting right to parent; specifically, the interest is in rearing children whom one can parent adequately. If such a right exists it can provide a solution to scepticism about duties of justice concerning distant future generations and bypass the challenge provided by the non-identity problem. Current children - whose identity is independent from environment-affecting decisions of current adults - will have, in due course, a right to parent. Adequate parenting requires resources. We owe (...)
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  7. Why the Standard Interpretation of Aldo Leopold’s Land Ethic is Mistaken.Mark Bryant Budolfson - 2014 - Environmental Ethics 36 (4):443-453.
    The standard interpretation of Aldo Leopold’s land ethic is that correct land management is whatever tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community, of which we humans are merely a small part. From this interpretation, it is a short step to interpreting Leopold as a sort of deep ecologist or radical environmentalist. However, this interpretation is based on a small number of quotations from Leopold taken out of context. Once these quota­tions are put into context, and (...)
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  8. Rights, Pollution, and Public Policy.H. Sterling Burnett - 2010 - In Christi Favor, Gerald F. Gaus & Julian Lamont (eds.), Essays on Philosophy, Politics & Economics: Integration & Common Research Projects. Stanford Economics and Finance.
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  9. Negotiating Environmental Rights.Ken A. Bryson - 2008 - Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):351 – 366.
    Environmental ethics arises as the output of a trade-off between our rights and nature's right to life. This negotiation secures the possibility of achieving sustainable developments, if it is conducted fairly. The rights of persons are delimited by their origin, as are the rights of the other. A person is the output of relationships taking place at three levels: (1) a material self; (2) a social self; and (3) a private or internal self. Pollution and war serve as an epitaph (...)
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  10. Environmental Rights in a Welfare State? A Comment on DeMerieux.Chris Miller - 2003 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (1):111-125.
    The derivation of a category of ‘environmental rights’ (as argued in this journal by Margaret DeMerieux) from certain cases heard in the European Court of Human Rights is examined. Opposing the majority judicial opinion of that court, there is emerging a dissenting view which is reluctant to extend a rights perspective to those nuisances which can, in theory, be avoided by relocation of the family home. This critique is then extended to Marcic v Thames Water Utilities in which the claimant (...)
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  11. Original Populations and Environmental Rights.Timo Airaksinen - 1988 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):37-47.
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  12. Do Future Generations Have the Right to Breathe Clean Air? A Note.Bertram Bandman - 1982 - Political Theory 10 (1):95-102.
  13. Diagonal Environmental Rights.John H. Knox - manuscript
    Environmental rights are diagonal if they are held by individuals or groups against the governments of states other than their own. The potential importance of such rights is obvious: governments' actions often affect the environment beyond their jurisdiction, and those who live in and rely upon the environment affected would like to be able to exercise rights against the governments causing them harm. Although international law has not adopted a comprehensive, uniform approach to such rights, human rights law and international (...)
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