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  1. The Politics of Envy: Outlaw Emotions in Capitalist Societies.Alfred Archer, Alan Thomas & Bart Engelen - forthcoming - In Sara Protasi (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Envy. Rowman and Littlefield.
  2. An Interdisciplinary Perspective on the Value of Envy.Jens Lange & Sara Protasi - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-20.
    The public and scholars alike largely consider envy to be reprehensible. This judgment of the value of envy commonly results either from a limited understanding of the nature of envy or from a limited understanding of how to determine the value of phenomena. Overcoming this state requires an interdisciplinary collaboration of psychologists and philosophers. That is, broad empirical evidence regarding the nature of envy generated in psychological studies must inform judgments about the value of envy according to sophisticated philosophical standards. (...)
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  3. Sara Protasi: The Philosophy of Envy Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2021. Hardback (ISBN 978-1-316-51917-2), £75. 260 pp. [REVIEW]Alba Montes Sánchez - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-3.
    Envy is a complex and intriguing emotion that has received too little philosophical attention in recent years. Sara Protasi has come to remedy that gap with an original, thorough and carefully researched monograph that defends the view that envy is not all vicious, that one of its varieties can be fully virtuous, and that it plays an important role in our moral psychology.
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  4. The Philosophy of Envy, by Sara Protasi. [REVIEW]Adam Piovarchy - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-2.
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  5. The Things We Envy: Fitting Envy and Human Goodness.Sara Protasi - forthcoming - In Christopher Howard & Richard Rowland (eds.), Fittingness. Oxford University Press.
    I argue that fitting envy plays a special role in safeguarding our happiness and flourishing. After presenting my theory of envy and its fittingness conditions, I contrast Kant’s view that envy is always unfitting with D’Arms and Jacobson’s defense of fitting envy as an evolutionarily-shaped response to a deep and wide human concern, that is, relative positioning. However, D’Arms and Jacobson don’t go far enough. First, I expand on their analysis of positional goodness, distinguishing between an epistemic claim, according to (...)
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  6. Envy as a Civic Emotion.Sara Protasi - forthcoming - In Thom Brooks (ed.), Political Emotions: Towards a Decent Public Sphere. London: Palgrave Macmillan.
    In A Theory of Justice, John Rawls discusses “the problem of envy”, namely the worry that the well-ordered society could be destabilized by envy. Martha Nussbaum has proposed, in Political Emotions: Why Love Matters for Justice, that love, in particular what she calls civic friendship, is the solution to this problem. Nussbaum’s suggestion is in accordance with the long-standing notion that love and envy are incompatible opposites, and that the virtue of love is an antidote to the vice of envy. (...)
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  7. "You're Just Jealous!": On Envious Blame.Neal Tognazzini - forthcoming - In Sara Protasi (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Envy.
    One common reaction to criticism is to try to deflect it by calling into question the motivations of the person doing the criticizing. For example, if I feel like you are blaming me for something that you yourself are guilty of having done in the past, I might respond with the retort, "Who are you to blame me for this?", where this retort is meant to serve not as an excuse but rather as a challenge to the standing of the (...)
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  8. “I Could Have Been You”: Existential Envy and the Self.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - forthcoming - In Sara Protasi (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Envy.
    This paper explores “existential envy” as a kind of envy in which the subject targets the rival’s entire being rather than one of her possessions, achievements or talents. It argues that existential envy is characterized by a weakening of the distinction between good and rival and by a strong focus on the envious self. In existential envy, the subject becomes aware that another person is closer to her ideal self than she is, such that the rival painfully reminds her of (...)
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  9. Envy-Free Allocations Respecting Social Networks.Robert Bredereck, Andrzej Kaczmarczyk & Rolf Niedermeier - 2022 - Artificial Intelligence 305:103664.
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  10. The Moral Psychology of Envy.Sara Protasi (ed.) - 2022 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The book explores the role of envy in society and its nature as a social emotion that is deeply concerned with both the self and others. It examines envy’s morally problematic aspects but also its aspirations, its effects, and its manifestations in a variety of contexts both personal and political.
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  11. Envy, Powerlessness and the Feeling of Self-Worth.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2022 - In Anna Bortolan & Elisa Magrì (eds.), Empathy, Intersubjectivity, and the Social World. De Gruyter. pp. 279 - 302.
    While standard definitions of envy tend to focus on the coveted good or the envied rival, this paper describes envy by reflecting on the envious self and its feelings. The paper begins by describing envy and establishing its key features and objects. It presents envy as an emotion of self-assessment which necessarily involves a sense of powerlessness and a feeling of one’s own diminishing value as a person. The second section illustrates the link between envy and the feeling of self-worth (...)
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  12. Envy and Rivalry in Aristotle’s Rhetoric.Silvia Gastaldi - 2021 - In Paola Giacomoni, Nicolò Valentini & Sara Dellantonio (eds.), The Dark Side: Philosophical Reflections on the “Negative Emotions”. Springer Verlag. pp. 65-80.
    Aristotle’s most thorough discussion of the emotions is certainly the one offered in Book 2 of the Rhetoric. This examination unfolds in Chapters 2–11, and concerns exclusively the emotions experienced by citizens: they are the addressees of rhetorical speeches, and the emotions they experience can influence, modify and shape judgements in political as well as legal settings.In this essay I shall examine the so-called ‘competitive emotions’, i.e. emotions that originate from conflicts arising between citizens in connection with possession of different (...)
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  13. Social–Structural Antecedents Come Forward to Elicit Envy to Distant Out-Groups.Nino Javakhishvili, Nino Butsashvili, Irina Vardanashvili & Anna Gogibedashvili - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This study utilizing correlation, regression, confirmatory factor analyses, ANOVA, moderation and mediation analysis investigated connections of stereotypes, emotions, and sociocultural variables in a single-sample/single-group design. Prior to data processing, Georgian versions of the Stereotype Content Model questionnaires were validated through CFA. The study looked at Georgian students' attitudes to: representatives of German-speaking countries and representatives of English-speaking countries. Emotions predicted to these groups by social–structural antecedents—vitality and fear of assimilation—and stereotypes were admiration, pride, and sympathy. In addition, envy was predicted (...)
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  14. Envy and Resentment in the Time of Coronavirus.Sara Protasi - 2021 - Journal of Hate Studies 17 (1):4-13.
    I examine the role played by the emotions of envy and resentment in interpersonal online dynamics during the COVID19 pandemic. I start by reviewing what we know about the interplay of social media use, social comparison and well-being, and by applying this knowledge to current circumstances. Then, I introduce some philosophical distinctions that complicate the already complex empirical evidence, differentiating, in particular, between envy and resentment, and between different kinds of envy. I argue that we can use the knowledge of (...)
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  15. The Old Man’s Bundle, Still: Kristi Olson Revisits the Envy Test.Shlomi Segall - 2021 - Analysis 81 (2):378-385.
    Individuals come into the world with talents that differ greatly in their marketability. These talents command a wide variety of rents; from millions of dollars per film for a movie star, to just a few thousands of dollars per annum for a fast-food joint worker. How should we distribute income fairly given these disparities? That is the topic of Kristi Olson’s excellent new book, The Solidarity Solution: Principles for a Fair Income Distribution. 1 1 The question is not new, but (...)
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  16. Envy, Powerlessness, and the Feeling of Self-Worth.Íngrid Vendrell Ferran - 2021 - In Elisa Magrì & Anna Bortolan (eds.), Empathy, Intersubjectivity, and the Social World: The Continued Relevance of Phenomenology. Essays in Honour of Dermot Moran. Degruyter. pp. 279-302.
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  17. Jealousy and the Sense of Self: Unamuno and the Contemporary Philosophy of Emotion.Íngrid Vendrell-Ferran - 2021 - Philosophy and Literature 45 (2):295 - 314.
    This paper explores jealousy in Unamuno’s drama El otro. Drawing on contemporary philosophy of emotion, I will argue that for the Spanish author jealousy gives the subject a sense of self. The paper begins by embedding Unamuno’s philosophical anthropology in the context of contemporary emotion theory. It then presents the drama as an investigation into the affective dimension of self-identity. The third section offers an analysis of jealousy as an emotion of self-assessment. The final section discusses how this drama can (...)
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  18. Envy's Non-Innocent Victims.Iskra Fileva - 2019 - Journal of Philosophy of Emotion 1 (1):1-22.
    Envy has often been seen as a vice and the envied as its victims. I suggest that this plausible view has an important limitation: the envied sometimes actively try to provoke envy. They may, thus, be non-innocent victims. Having argued for this thesis, I draw some practical implications.
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  19. Happy Self-Surrender and Unhappy Self-Assertion: A Comparison Between Admiration and Emulative Envy.Sara Protasi - 2019 - In Alfred Archer & Andre Grahlé (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Admiration. New York: Rowman & Little International. pp. 45-60.
    In this chapter, I argue that a certain kind of envy is not only morally permissible, but also, sometimes, more fitting and productive than admiration. Envy and admiration are part of our emotional palette, our toolbox of evolutionary adaptations, and they play complementary roles. I start by introducing my original taxonomy of envy, which allows me to present emulative envy, a species of envy sometimes confused with admiration. After reviewing how the two emotions differ from a psychological perspective, I focus (...)
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  20. Envy and Us.Alessandro Salice & Alba Montes Sánchez - 2019 - European Journal of Philosophy 27 (1):227-242.
    Within emotion theory, envy is generally portrayed as an antisocial emotion because the relation between the envier and the rival is thought to be purely antagonistic. This paper resists this view by arguing that envy presupposes a sense of us. First, we claim that hostile envy is triggered by the envier's sense of impotence combined with her perception that an equality principle has been violated. Second, we introduce the notion of â hetero-induced self-conscious emotionsâ by focusing on the paradigmatic cases (...)
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  21. Narrative Fiction as Philosophical Exploration: A Case Study on Self-Envy and Akrasia.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran - 2019 - In Falk Bornmüller, Johannes Franzen & Mathis Lessau (eds.), Literature as Thought Experiment. Wilhelm Fink.
    This paper explores one of Unamuno's most challeng-ing short stories: Artemio, heuatontimoroumenos (1918). In this text, Unamuno deals with an experience for which he coins the expression ›self-envy‹. Is ›self-envy‹ conceptually sound? Or is it an unsuitable phrase for an emotional state that has nothing to do with envy? The paper proceeds in three steps in order to answer these questions. After presenting Unamuno’s Artemio, heuatontimoroumenos (section 1), the following section considers the notion of self-envy, which I interpret as a (...)
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  22. Jalousie.Frédéric Minner - 2018 - Encyclopédie Philosophique.
    On conçoit souvent la jalousie comme une émotion ayant pour objet les relations de proximité (amour, amitié, fratrie, etc.). Elle a généralement mauvaise presse et est typiquement envisagée comme une émotion moralement condamnable, voire comme un vice. Or, la jalousie ne porte pas uniquement sur les relations de proximité : elle peut également porter sur divers biens (prestige, richesses, biens matériels, privilèges, etc.). Par ailleurs, certains auteurs soutiennent que des cas de jalousie pourraient être moralement justifiés, voire que la jalousie (...)
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  23. Invideo Et Amo: On Envying the Beloved.Sara Protasi - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1765-1784.
    Can we love and envy the same person at the same time? There is an overwhelming, cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary, consensus that love and envy are deeply incompatible. In this paper, I challenge this consensus, and focus in particular on the normative thesis that true love should be void of envy proper. I first propose an indirect argument. Because love and envy thrive in the same psychological conditions, it is not unlikely to feel envy toward the beloved. If we want ideals (...)
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  24. ‘I'm Not Envious, I'm Just Jealous!’: On the Difference Between Envy and Jealousy.Sara Protasi - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (3):316-333.
    I argue for the view that envy and jealousy are distinct emotions, whose crucial difference is that envy involves a perception of lack while jealousy involves a perception of loss. I start by noting the common practice of using ‘envy’ and ‘jealousy’ almost interchangeably, and I contrast it with the empirical evidence that shows that envy and jealousy are distinct, albeit similar and often co-occurring, emotions. I then argue in favor of a specific way of understanding their distinction: the view (...)
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  25. Phenomenological Distinctions: Two Types of Envy and Their Difference From Covetousness.Michael R. Kelly - 2016 - In J. Aaron Simmons & J. Edward Hackett (eds.), Phenomenology for the Twenty-first Century. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  26. Varieties of Envy.Sara Protasi - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):535-549.
    In this paper I present a novel taxonomy of envy, according to which there are four kinds of envy: emulative, inert, aggressive and spiteful envy. An inquiry into the varieties of envy is valuable not only to understand it as a psychological phenomenon, but also to shed light on the nature of its alleged viciousness. The first section introduces the intuition that there is more than one kind of envy, together with the anecdotal and linguistic evidence that supports it. The (...)
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  27. The Object and Affects of Envy and Emulation.Michael R. Kelly - 2015 - Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 14 (2):386-401.
  28. From Rationality to Emotionally Embedded Relations: Envy as a Signal of Power in Stakeholder Relations.Marjo Siltaoja & Merja Lähdesmäki - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):837-850.
    Although stakeholder salience theory has received a great deal of scholarly attention in the business ethics and management literature, the theory has been criticized for overemphasizing rationality in managerial perceptions. We argue that it is important to better understand what socially constructed emotions signal in business relations, and we posit the role of envy as a discursive resource used to signal and construct the asymmetrical power relations between small business owner–managers and their stakeholders. Our study is based on a qualitative (...)
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  29. The Moral Value of Envy.Krista K. Thomason - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):36-53.
    It is common to think that we would be morally better people if we never felt envy. Recently, some philosophers have rejected this conclusion by arguing that envy can often be directed toward unfairness or inequality. As such, they conclude that we should not suppress our feelings of envy. I argue, however, that these defenses only show that envy is sometimes morally permissible. In order to show that we would not be better off without envy, we must show how envy (...)
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  30. When Envy Leads to Schadenfreude.Niels van de Ven, Charles E. Hoogland, Richard H. Smith, Wilco W. van Dijk, Seger M. Breugelmans & Marcel Zeelenberg - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (6):1007-1025.
  31. Envy and Its Discontents.Timothy Perrine & Kevin Timpe - 2014 - In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. pp. 225-244.
    Envy is, roughly, the disposition to desire that another lose a perceived good so that one can, by comparison, feel better about one’s self. The divisiveness of envy follows not just from one’s willing against the good of the other, but also from the other vices that spring from it. It is for this second reason that envy is a capital vice. This chapter begins by arguing for a definition of envy similar to that given by Aquinas and then considers (...)
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  32. Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens: A Socio-Psychological Approach.Ed Sanders - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens examines the sensation, expression, and literary representation of envy and jealousy in Classical Athens.
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  33. An Analysis of Prudential Value.Stephen M. Campbell - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (3):334-54.
    This essay introduces and defends a new analysis of prudential value. According to this analysis, what it is for something to be good for you is for that thing to contribute to the appeal or desirability of being in your position. I argue that this proposal fits well with our ways of talking about prudential value and well-being; enables promising analyses of the related concepts of luck, selfishness, self-sacrifice, and paternalism; preserves the relationship between prudential value and the attitudes of (...)
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  34. Envy Up, Scorn Down. How Status Divides Us.Susan T. Fiske - 2011 - Russel Sage Foundation.
    The book deftly shows that understanding envy and scorn—and seeking to mitigate their effects—can prove invaluable to our lives, our relationships, and our society.
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  35. Envy and Self-Worth: Amending Aquinas’s Definition of Envy.Timothy Perrine - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):433-446.
    In the Summa Theologiae, Aquinas offers an adept account of the vice of envy. Despite the virtues of his account, he nevertheless fails to provide an adequatedefinition of the vice. Instead, he offers two different definitions each of which fails to identify what is common to all cases of envy. Here I supplement Aquinas’saccount by providing what I take to be common to all cases of envy. I argue that what is common is a “perception of inferiority”—when a person perceives (...)
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  36. Envy and Grace.Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore - 2008 - Logos- St. Thomas 11 (1):163-172.
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  37. Envy.Justin D'Arms - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  38. Envy in the Philosophical Tradition.Justin D'Arms & Allison Kerr - 2008 - In Richard Kim (ed.), Envy, Theory and Research. Oxford University Press. pp. 39-59.
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  39. Envy: Theory and Research.Richard H. Smith (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    This book has an overall focus on psychological approaches to the study of envy, but it also has a strong interdisciplinary character as well. Envy serves as a reference and spur for further research for researchers in psychology as well as other disciplines."--BOOK JACKET.
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  40. Envy, Facts and Justice: A Critique of the Treatment of Envy in Justice as Fairness.Patrick Tomlin - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (2):101-116.
    A common anti-egalitarian argument is that equality is motivated by envy, or the desire to placate envy. In order to avoid this charge, John Rawls explicitly banishes envy from his original position. This article argues that this is an inconsistent and untenable position for Rawls, as he treats envy as if it were a fact of human psychology and believes that principles of justice should be based on such facts. Therefore envy should be known about in the original position. The (...)
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  41. Aquinas on Attachment, Envy, and Hatred in the "Summa Theologica".Keith Green - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):403 - 428.
    This essay examines Aquinas's discussions of hatred in Summa Theologica I-II, Q. 29 and II-II, Q. 34, in order to retrieve an account of what contemporary theorists of the emotions call its cognitive contents. In Aquinas's view, hatred is constituted as a passion by a narrative pattern that includes its intentional object, beliefs, perceptions of changes in bodily states, and motivated desires. This essay endorses Aquinas's broadly "cognitivist" account of passional hatred, in line with his way of treating passions in (...)
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  42. Envy and Akrasia in Seneca's Thyestes.David Kovacs - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (02):787-791.
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  43. The Envious Mind.Maria Miceli & Cristiano Castelfranchi - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):449-479.
  44. The Green-Eyed Monster and Malicious Joy: The Neuroanatomical Bases of Envy and Gloating (Schadenfreude).Simone Shamay-Tsoory, Yasmin Tibi-Elhanany & Judith Aharon-Peretz - 2007 - Brain 130:1663-1678.
  45. Comprehending Envy.Richard Smith & Sung Hee Kim - 2007 - Psychological Bulletin 133:46-64.
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  46. Envy and Efficiency.Joseph Heath - 2006 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 13.
    Joseph Heath1 The Pareto principle states that if a proposed change in the condition of society makes at least one person better off, and does not make anyone else worse off, then that change should be regarded as an improvement. This principle forms the conceptual core of modern welfare economics, and exercises enormous influence in contemporary discussions of justice and equality. It does, however, have an Achilles’ heel. When an individual experiences envy, it means that improvements in the condition of (...)
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  47. Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value.Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:99-126.
    According to Cicero, “all emotions spring from the roots of error: they should not be pruned or clipped here and there, but yanked out” (Cicero 2002: 60). The Stoic enthusiasm for the extirpation of emotion is radical in two respects, both of which can be expressed with the claim that emotional responses are never appropriate. First, the Stoics held that emotions are incompatible with virtue , since the virtuous man will retain his equanimity whatever his fate. Grief is always vicious, (...)
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  48. Deadly Vices.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Gabriele Taylor presents a philosophical investigation of the "ordinary" vices traditionally seen as "death to the soul": sloth, envy, avarice, pride, anger, lust, and gluttony. In the course of a richly detailed discussion of individual and interrelated vices, which complements recent work by moral philosophers on virtue, she shows why these "deadly sins" are correctly so named and grouped together.
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  49. Phthonos D. Konstan, N. K. Rutter (Edd.): Envy, Spite and Jealousy. The Rivalrous Emotions in Ancient Greece . (Edinburgh Leventis Studies 2.) Pp. Xiv + 305. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-7846-1603-. [REVIEW]Elaine Fantham - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (01):180-.
  50. Talent, Slavery and Envy in Dworkin's Equality of Resources.Miriam Cohen Christofidis - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (3):267-287.
    In this article I argue against Ronald Dworkin's rejection of the labour auction in his ‘Equality of Resources’. I criticize Dworkin's claims that the talented would envy the untalented in such an auction, and that the talented in particular would be enslaved by it. I identify some ways in which the talent auction is underdescribed and I compare the results for the condition of the talented of different further descriptions of it. I conclude that Dworkin's deviation from the ‘envy test’ (...)
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