Related categories

62 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 62
  1. added 2018-09-18
    Jalousie.Frédéric Minner - 2018 - Encyclopédie Philosophique.
    On conçoit souvent la jalousie comme une émotion ayant pour objet les relations de proximité (amour, amitié, fratrie, etc.). Elle a généralement mauvaise presse et est typiquement envisagée comme une émotion moralement condamnable, voire comme un vice. Or, la jalousie ne porte pas uniquement sur les relations de proximité : elle peut également porter sur divers biens (prestige, richesses, biens matériels, privilèges, etc.). Par ailleurs, certains auteurs soutiennent que des cas de jalousie pourraient être moralement justifiés, voire que la jalousie (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2018-08-27
    Envy and Us.Alessandro Salice & Alba Montes Sánchez - forthcoming - European Journal of Philosophy.
    Within emotion theory, envy is generally portrayed as an antisocial emotion because the relation between the envier and the rival is thought to be purely antagonistic. This paper resists this view by arguing that envy presupposes a sense of us. First, we claim that hostile envy is triggered by the envier's sense of impotence combined with her perception that an equality principle has been violated. Second, we introduce the notion of â hetero-induced self-conscious emotionsâ by focusing on the paradigmatic cases (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2018-02-17
    Envy, Theory and Research.Richard Smith (ed.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2017-07-09
    ‘I'm Not Envious, I'm Just Jealous!’: On the Difference Between Envy and Jealousy.Sara Protasi - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (3):316-333.
    I argue for the view that envy and jealousy are distinct emotions, whose crucial difference is that envy involves a perception of lack while jealousy involves a perception of loss. I start by noting the common practice of using ‘envy’ and ‘jealousy’ almost interchangeably, and I contrast it with the empirical evidence that shows that envy and jealousy are distinct, albeit similar and often co-occurring, emotions. I then argue in favor of a specific way of understanding their distinction: the view (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. added 2017-06-23
    Invideo Et Amo: On Envying the Beloved.Sara Protasi - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1765-1784.
    Can we love and envy the same person at the same time? There is an overwhelming, cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary, consensus that love and envy are deeply incompatible. In this paper, I challenge this consensus, and focus in particular on the normative thesis that true love should be void of envy proper. I first propose an indirect argument. Because love and envy thrive in the same psychological conditions, it is not unlikely to feel envy toward the beloved. If we want ideals (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2016-12-08
    Envy and Resentment.Marguerite La Caze - 2001 - Philosophical Explorations 4 (1):31-45.
    Envy and resentment are generally thought to be unpleasant and unethical emotions which ought to be condemned. I argue that both envy and resentment, in some important forms, are moral emotions connected with concern for justice, understood in terms of desert and entitlement. They enable us to recognise injustice, work as a spur to acting against it and connect us to others. Thus, we should accept these emotions as part of the ethical life.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  7. added 2016-12-08
    Envy and Commercial Society: Mandeville and Smith on "Private Vices, Public Benefits".T. A. Horne - 1981 - Political Theory 9 (4):551-569.
    Man [in commercial society] is sometimes found a detached and solitary being; he has found an object which sets him in competition with his fellow creatures, and he deals with them as he does with his cattle and his soil, for the sake of the profits they bring; the mighty engine which we suppose to have formed society, only tends to set its members at variance, or to continue their intercourse after the bonds of affection are broken.1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. added 2016-07-27
    Phenomenological Distinctions: Two Types of Envy and Their Difference From Covetousness.Michael R. Kelly - 2016 - In J. Aaron Simmons & J. Edward Hackett (eds.), Phenomenology for the Twenty-first Century. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2016-03-07
    When Envy Leads to Schadenfreude.Niels van de Ven, Charles E. Hoogland, Richard H. Smith, Wilco W. van Dijk, Seger M. Breugelmans & Marcel Zeelenberg - 2015 - Cognition and Emotion 29 (6):1007-1025.
  10. added 2016-03-07
    Fortunes-of-Others Emotions and Justice.Kristján Kristjánsson - 2003 - Journal of Philosophical Research 28:105-128.
    Despite the resurgent interest in the emotions, not much attention has focused specifically on those emotions that relate to others. deserved or undeserved fortunes. In this essay, I explore such emotions, logically and morally, with special emphasis on indignation and Schadenfreude. I argue that, when Aristotle.s treatment of this family of emotions is stripped of certain anomalies, it gives a logically satisfying and morally suggestive, if perhaps overly rigid, account of all the relevant emotions and their relations. I use those (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  11. added 2015-09-02
    The Object and Affects of Envy and Emulation.Michael R. Kelly - 2015 - Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 14 (2):386-401.
  12. added 2015-08-21
    Varieties of Envy.Sara Protasi - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (4):535-549.
    In this paper I present a novel taxonomy of envy, according to which there are four kinds of envy: emulative, inert, aggressive and spiteful envy. An inquiry into the varieties of envy is valuable not only to understand it as a psychological phenomenon, but also to shed light on the nature of its alleged viciousness. The first section introduces the intuition that there is more than one kind of envy, together with the anecdotal and linguistic evidence that supports it. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. added 2015-03-23
    The Moral Value of Envy.Krista K. Thomason - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):36-53.
    It is common to think that we would be morally better people if we never felt envy. Recently, some philosophers have rejected this conclusion by arguing that envy can often be directed toward unfairness or inequality. As such, they conclude that we should not suppress our feelings of envy. I argue, however, that these defenses only show that envy is sometimes morally permissible. In order to show that we would not be better off without envy, we must show how envy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  14. added 2015-03-18
    Nietzsche on Envy.Gary Shapiro - 1983 - International Studies in Philosophy 15 (2):3-12.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2014-11-17
    Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens: A Socio-Psychological Approach.Ed Sanders - 2014 - Oup Usa.
    Envy and Jealousy in Classical Athens examines the sensation, expression, and literary representation of envy and jealousy in Classical Athens.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  16. added 2014-04-02
    Envy and Self-Worth.Timothy Perrine - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):433-446.
    In the Summa Theologiae, Aquinas offers an adept account of the vice of envy. Despite the virtues of his account, he nevertheless fails to provide an adequatedefinition of the vice. Instead, he offers two different definitions each of which fails to identify what is common to all cases of envy. Here I supplement Aquinas’saccount by providing what I take to be common to all cases of envy. I argue that what is common is a “perception of inferiority”—when a person perceives (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2014-03-31
    Envy and Inequality.Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy 89 (11):551-581.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. added 2014-03-24
    Revaluing Envy and Resentment.Marguerite La Caze - 2002 - Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):155 – 158.
    Some forms of envy and resentment are centrally connected with a concern for justice and so should not be morally condemned but accepted. Envy and resentment enable us to discern and respond to injustices against ourselves and others. I argue that whereas envy and resentment as character traits or dispositions may be ethically deplorable, as episodic emotions they can be both moral responses to injustice and lead to action against injustice.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. added 2014-03-24
    Are Envy, Anger, and Resentment Moral Emotions?Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 2002 - Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):148 – 154.
    The moral status of emotions has recently become the focus of various philosophical investigations. Certain emotions that have traditionally been considered as negative, such as envy, jealousy, pleasure-in-others'-misfortune, and pride, have been defended. Some traditionally "negative" emotions have even been declared to be moral emotions. In this brief paper, I suggest two basic criteria according to which an emotion might be considered moral, and I then examine whether envy, anger, and resentment are moral emotions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  20. added 2014-03-24
    La Caze on Envy and Resentment.Stan Van Hooft - 2002 - Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):141 – 147.
    Marguerite La Caze has recently published a stimulating analysis of the emotions of envy and resentment in which she argues that to envy others for a benefit they have received or to resent them for such a reason can be ethically acceptable in cases where that benefit has been unjustly obtained (La Caze, 2001). I question this on the ground that the judgement that the benefit has been unjustly obtained plays a more complex role in the structure of envy and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. added 2014-03-24
    Equality, Envy, and the Sense of Injustice.Richard J. Norman - 2002 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):43–54.
    This paper attempts to defend the value of equality against the accusation that it is an expression of irrational and disreputable feelings of envy of those who are better off. It draws on Rawls’ account of the sense of justice to suggest that resentment of inequalities may be a proper resentment of injustice. The case of resentment of ‘free riders’ is taken as one plausible example of a justified resentment of those who benefit unfairly from a scheme of cooperation. Further (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. added 2014-03-22
    Education and the Politics of Envy.John Ahier & John Beck - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (4):320 - 343.
    This paper addresses the somewhat neglected topic of envy and its relationship to education and social inequality in Britain. Drawing on the work of Rawls, Runciman and Crosland, the paper proposes a distinction between envy as a vice and 'justified resentment' aroused by perceived injustices in the social distribution of primary goods, including education. Various pejorative uses of the term 'the politics of envy' in UK politics are examined. The conditions necessary for a politics of justified resentment are then analysed. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  23. added 2014-03-22
    The Seven Deadly Sins: Jewish, Christian, and Classical Reflections on Human Psychology.Solomon Schimmel - 1997 - Oup Usa.
    Schimmel, a practicing psychologist, maintains that psychologists and psychotherapists must incorporate many of the ethical and spiritual values of religion and moral philosophy if they are effectively to address the emotional problems faced by modern men and women. The book draws on the psychological insights provided by the Hebrew Bible, the Gospels, Aristotle, Maimonides, Aquinas and others to show what we can learn from their teachings about the relationship between virtue and psychological well-being and vice and emotional distress.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  24. added 2014-03-18
    Talent, Slavery and Envy in Dworkin's Equality of Resources.Miriam Cohen Christofidis - 2004 - Utilitas 16 (3):267-287.
    In this article I argue against Ronald Dworkin's rejection of the labour auction in his ‘Equality of Resources’. I criticize Dworkin's claims that the talented would envy the untalented in such an auction, and that the talented in particular would be enslaved by it. I identify some ways in which the talent auction is underdescribed and I compare the results for the condition of the talented of different further descriptions of it. I conclude that Dworkin's deviation from the ‘envy test’ (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  25. added 2014-03-18
    Jealousy in Relation to Envy.Luke Purshouse - 2004 - Erkenntnis 60 (2):179-205.
    The conceptions of jealousy used by philosophical writers are various, and, this paper suggests, largely inadequate. In particular, the difference between jealousy and envy has not yet been plausibly specified. This paper surveys some past analyses of this distinction and addresses problems with them, before proposing its own positive account of jealousy, developed from an idea of Leila Tov-Ruach(a.k.a. A. O. Rorty). Three conditions for being jealous are proposed and it is shownhow each of them helps to tell the emotion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  26. added 2014-03-17
    Envy and Akrasia in Seneca's Thyestes.David Kovacs - 2007 - Classical Quarterly 57 (02):787-791.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2014-03-17
    Deadly Vices.Gabriele Taylor - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Gabriele Taylor presents a philosophical investigation of the "ordinary" vices traditionally seen as "death to the soul": sloth, envy, avarice, pride, anger, lust, and gluttony. In the course of a richly detailed discussion of individual and interrelated vices, which complements recent work by moral philosophers on virtue, she shows why these "deadly sins" are correctly so named and grouped together.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28. added 2014-03-16
    Envy, Facts and Justice: A Critique of the Treatment of Envy in Justice as Fairness.Patrick Tomlin - 2008 - Res Publica 14 (2):101-116.
    A common anti-egalitarian argument is that equality is motivated by envy, or the desire to placate envy. In order to avoid this charge, John Rawls explicitly banishes envy from his original position. This article argues that this is an inconsistent and untenable position for Rawls, as he treats envy as if it were a fact of human psychology and believes that principles of justice should be based on such facts. Therefore envy should be known about in the original position. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  29. added 2014-03-15
    Aquinas on Attachment, Envy, and Hatred in the "Summa Theologica".Keith Green - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):403 - 428.
    This essay examines Aquinas's discussions of hatred in Summa Theologica I-II, Q. 29 and II-II, Q. 34, in order to retrieve an account of what contemporary theorists of the emotions call its cognitive contents. In Aquinas's view, hatred is constituted as a passion by a narrative pattern that includes its intentional object, beliefs, perceptions of changes in bodily states, and motivated desires. This essay endorses Aquinas's broadly "cognitivist" account of passional hatred, in line with his way of treating passions in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  30. added 2014-03-14
    Schadenfreude in Sport: Envy, Justice, and Self-Esteem.Mike McNamee - 2003 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 30 (1):1-16.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. added 2014-03-11
    From Rationality to Emotionally Embedded Relations: Envy as a Signal of Power in Stakeholder Relations.Marjo Siltaoja & Merja Lähdesmäki - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (4):837-850.
    Although stakeholder salience theory has received a great deal of scholarly attention in the business ethics and management literature, the theory has been criticized for overemphasizing rationality in managerial perceptions. We argue that it is important to better understand what socially constructed emotions signal in business relations, and we posit the role of envy as a discursive resource used to signal and construct the asymmetrical power relations between small business owner–managers and their stakeholders. Our study is based on a qualitative (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. added 2014-03-11
    The Green-Eyed Monster and Malicious Joy: The Neuroanatomical Bases of Envy and Gloating (Schadenfreude).Simone Shamay-Tsoory, Yasmin Tibi-Elhanany & Judith Aharon-Peretz - 2007 - Brain 130:1663-1678.
  33. added 2014-03-11
    Envy and Schadenfreude.Richard Smith, Terence Turner, Ron Garonzick, Colin Leach, Vanessa Urch-Druskat & Christine Weston - 1996 - Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 22 (2):158-168.
  34. added 2014-02-26
    Envy and Its Discontents.Timothy Perrine & Kevin Timpe - 2014 - In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press. pp. 225-244.
    Envy is, roughly, the disposition to desire that another lose a perceived good so that one can, by comparison, feel better about one’s self. The divisiveness of envy follows not just from one’s willing against the good of the other, but also from the other vices that spring from it. It is for this second reason that envy is a capital vice. This chapter begins by arguing for a definition of envy similar to that given by Aquinas and then considers (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. added 2014-02-26
    Envy Up, Scorn Down. How Status Divides Us.Susan Fiske - 2011 - Russel Sage Foundation.
    The book deftly shows that understanding envy and scorn—and seeking to mitigate their effects—can prove invaluable to our lives, our relationships, and our society.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36. added 2014-02-26
    Envy in the Philosophical Tradition.Justin D'Arms & Allison Kerr - 2008 - In Richard Kim (ed.), Envy, Theory and Research. Oxford University Press. pp. 39-59.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37. added 2014-02-26
    The Envious Mind.Maria Miceli & Cristiano Castelfranchi - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (3):449-479.
  38. added 2014-02-26
    Comprehending Envy.Richard Smith & Sung Hee Kim - 2007 - Psychological Bulletin 133:46-64.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  39. added 2014-02-26
    Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value.Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms - 2005 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:99-126.
    According to Cicero, “all emotions spring from the roots of error: they should not be pruned or clipped here and there, but yanked out” (Cicero 2002: 60). The Stoic enthusiasm for the extirpation of emotion is radical in two respects, both of which can be expressed with the claim that emotional responses are never appropriate. First, the Stoics held that emotions are incompatible with virtue , since the virtuous man will retain his equanimity whatever his fate. Grief is always vicious, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. added 2014-02-26
    Envy: The Seven Deadly Sins.Joseph Epstein - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Malice that cannot speak its name, cold-blooded but secret hostility, impotent desire, hidden rancor and spite--all cluster at the center of envy. Envy clouds thought, writes Joseph Epstein, clobbers generosity, precludes any hope of serenity, and ends in shriveling the heart. Of the seven deadly sins, he concludes, only envy is no fun at all. Writing in a conversational, erudite, self-deprecating style that wears its learning lightly, Epstein takes us on a stimulating tour of the many faces of envy. He (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41. added 2014-02-26
    Envy and Jealousy.Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):487 - 516.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  42. added 2014-02-26
    Envy and the Greeks: A Study of Human Behaviour. [REVIEW]H. W. Stubbs - 1981 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 101:180.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. added 2014-02-26
    Envy and the Greeks: A Study of Human Behaviour.Peter Walcot - 1978 - Aris & Phillips.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44. added 2014-02-26
    The Anatomy of Envy: A Study in Symbolic Behavior.George Foster - 1972 - Current Anthropology 13:165-202.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  45. added 2012-10-23
    An Analysis of Prudential Value.Stephen M. Campbell - 2013 - Utilitas 25 (3):334-54.
    This essay introduces and defends a new analysis of prudential value. According to this analysis, what it is for something to be good for you is for that thing to contribute to the appeal or desirability of being in your position. I argue that this proposal fits well with our ways of talking about prudential value and well-being; enables promising analyses of the related concepts of luck, selfishness, self-sacrifice, and paternalism; preserves the relationship between prudential value and the attitudes of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. added 2011-05-31
    Envy and Grace.Lloyd W. J. Aultman-Moore - 2008 - Logos- St. Thomas 11 (1):163-172.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. added 2011-05-31
    Phthonos D. Konstan, N. K. Rutter (Edd.): Envy, Spite and Jealousy. The Rivalrous Emotions in Ancient Greece . (Edinburgh Leventis Studies 2.) Pp. Xiv + 305. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003. Cased, £45. ISBN: 0-7846-1603-. [REVIEW]Elaine Fantham - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (01):180-.
  48. added 2011-05-31
    Envy in Pindar.M. J. Alden - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (01):5-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. added 2011-05-31
    Envy and Pity.Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev - 1993 - International Philosophical Quarterly 33 (1):3-19.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. added 2011-05-31
    Envy and Jealousy: Emotions and Vices.Gabriele Taylor - 1988 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):233-249.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
1 — 50 / 62