About this topic
Summary Epicureanism is the philosophical system formulated by Epicurus (341-271 BCE). It was one of the most influential and popular philosophical schools in the Hellenistic era. Epicureanism revives the atomism of Democritus and rejects the teleology of Aristotle and the immaterial soul and forms of Plato. All events are the result of indivisible bodies (atoms) interacting in the void, and the gods have no role in the workings of the world. Epicurean ethics is a form of ascetic egoistic hedonism. Only one's own pleasure is intrinsically valuable, but the limit of pleasure is freedom from bodily distress and (especially) peace of mind, and the way to acquire peace of mind is by limiting your desires. The Epicurean arguments against the fear of death have been especially influential: death is annihilation, and so your death is bad for you neither when you are alive (as you are not dead) nor when you are dead (as you no longer exist).
Key works Most of Epicurus' writings are lost, but book ten of Diogenes Laertius' Lives of Eminent Philosophers, in its summary of Epicurus' life and teachings, contains three letters by Epicurus that summarize his physics, views on celestial and meteorological phenomena, and ethics. It also includes the "Principal Doctrines," short sayings mainly on ethics. The Roman poet and fervent Epicurean Lucretius (c. 94-55 BCE) composed "On the Nature of Things," a massive 6-book summary of Epicurean physics. The Roman statesmen Cicero (106–43 BCE) includes important summaries of Epicurean arguments in his philosophical works. Long & Sedley 1987 and Inwood & Gerson 1994 are compendiums of many of the crucial texts, with Long & Sedley 1987 including extensive commentary.
Introductions Konstan 2008 is a good encyclopedia entry on Epicurus. O'Keefe 2009 is an accessible book-length overview of the Epicurean philosophical system, while Warren 2009 contains chapters that deal more extensively with the current scholarly literature.
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Subcategories:
Epicurus (943)
Lucretius (1,103)
Philodemus (166)

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  1. Von der Erkenntnistheorie der Natur Zur Idee der Praxis — Eine Marxsche Auseinandersetzung MIT der Naturphilosophie Demokrits Und Epikurs.Guli-Sanam Karimova - 2018 - In Dominik Novkovic & Alexander Akel (eds.), Karl Marx – Philosophie, Pädagogik, Gesellschaftstheorie und Politik. Kassel, Deutschland: pp. 141-157.
    Eine der frühesten Schriften des jungen Karl Marx — die Dissertationsschrift „Differenz der demokritischen und epikureischen Naturphilosophie“ — legt wichtige Fundamente für das gesamte Marx’sche Denken. In der Dissertationsschrift versucht Marx anhand des Vergleichs der antiken Naturphilosophien Demokrits und Epikurs grundlegende Erkenntnisse der theoretischen und praktischen Philosophie in einem komplexen, von Hegel inspirierten ontologischen System zu verbinden. Aus dieser kritischen Synthese antiker Naturphilosophien entsteht so eine auf Hegelschen Begriffen basierende, aber gleichzeitig reformierte Idee der Praxis. Auf diesen Grundlagen sowie mit (...)
  2. Hellenistic Cosmopolitanism.Eric Brown - 2006 - In Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.), A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Oxford, UK: pp. 549-558.
  3. Providencia divina y valor ontológico de los singulares: la polémica filosófica tardoantigua y la posición de Orígenes y de Nemesio de Émesa.Francisco Bastitta-Harriet - 2012 - Patristica Et Medievalia 33:37-50.
    El presente trabajo se concentra en el debate acerca de los alcances de la providencia que tuvo lugar entre las escuelas estoica, platónica y peripatética entre las siglos I y III de nuestra era. En ese contexto, analiza el problema del status ontológico de los singulares en Orígenes de Alejandría y Nemesio de Émesa. Influidos primariamente por la síntesis filoniana entre las distintas teorías griegas de providencia y la de las Escrituras, estos autores fundan la consistencia de los singulares en (...)
  4. James Warren, “The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists.” Review by Facundo Bey. [REVIEW]Facundo Bey - 2016 - Boletín de Estética 36:71-76.
    The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists se centra en la relación mutua entre las capacidades humanas de sentir placer y dolor y el carácter afectivo que las une con las facultades cognitivas de aprender, comprender, recordar, evocar, planificar y anticiparse. Para esto, Warren consagra toda su agudeza analítica a eminentes obras del pensamiento antiguo: particularmente nos referimos a los diálogos platónicos República, Protágoras y Filebo. Otro tanto hace con De Anima, De Memoria et Reminiscentia, Ética (...)
  5. Weight in Greek Atomism.Michael J. Augustin - 2015 - Philosophia 45 (1):76-99.
    The testimonia concerning weight in early Greek atomism appear to contradict one another. Some reports assert that the atoms do have weight, while others outright deny weight as a property of the atoms. A common solution to this apparent contradiction divides the testimonia into two groups. The first group describes the atoms within a κόσμος, where they have weight; the second group describes the atoms outside of a κόσμος, where they are weightless. A key testimonium for proponents of this solution (...)
  6. Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature.Michael James Bennett - 2017 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    In 1988 the philosopher Gilles Deleuze remarked that throughout his career he had always been 'circling around' a concept of nature. Showing how Deleuze weaves original readings of Plato, the Stoics, Aristotle, and Epicurus into some of his most famous arguments about event, difference, and problem, Michael James Bennett argues that these interpretations of ancient Greek physics provide vital clues for understanding Deleuze's own conception of nature. -/- "Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics" delves into the original Greek and Latin texts (...)
  7. Stoic and Epicurean.R. D. Hicks - 1911 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 8 (2):50-52.
  8. Fear Not: An Epicurean Exercise.Jasmin Contos - 2014 - Dissertation,
  9. Passions and Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind: Proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum.Christopher Gill, Jacques Brunschwig & Martha Nussbaum - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (4):583.
  10. Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind.John M. Cooper & Julia Annas - 1994 - Philosophical Review 103 (1):182.
  11. The Hellenistic Philosophers: Volume 2, Greek and Latin Texts with Notes and Bibliography.A. A. Long & D. N. Sedley - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive sourcebook makes available in the original Latin and Greek the principal extant texts required for the study of the Stoic, Epicurean and sceptical schools of philosophy. The material is organised by schools, and within each school topics are treated thematically. The volume presents the same texts as are translated in The Hellenistic Philosophers, Volume 1. The authors provide their own critical apparatus, and also supply detailed notes on the more difficult texts. This volume is equipped with a large (...)
  12. Diogenes Laertius: Lives of Eminent Philosophers.Tiziano Dorandi (ed.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    This edition presents a radically improved text of Diogenes Laertius' Lives of Eminent Philosophers. The text is accompanied by a full critical apparatus on three levels. A lengthy introduction lists all the manuscripts of the Lives and discusses its transmission in late antiquity, the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. There is also an index of personal names, a bibliography and notes covering several features of the text and its interpretation. Professor Dorandi has used the Nachlaß of Peter Von der Mühll, (...)
  13. The Hellenistic Philosophers: Volume 2, Greek and Latin Texts with Notes and Bibliography.A. A. Long & D. N. Sedley - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive sourcebook makes available in the original Latin and Greek the principal extant texts required for the study of the Stoic, Epicurean and sceptical schools of philosophy. The material is organised by schools, and within each school topics are treated thematically. The volume presents the same texts as are translated in The Hellenistic Philosophers, Volume 1. The authors provide their own critical apparatus, and also supply detailed notes on the more difficult texts. This volume is equipped with a large (...)
  14. The Stoic and Epicurean Philosophers.P. O. K. & Whitney J. Oates - 1941 - Journal of Philosophy 38 (16):446.
  15. Problems in Epicurean Physics.David Konstan - 1979 - Isis 70 (3):394-418.
  16. Quantitative Measurements and the Greek Atomists.Paul Tasch - 1948 - Isis 38 (3/4):185-189.
  17. The Talmudic View of Epicureanism.S. J. Bastomsky - 1973 - Apeiron 7 (1):17 - 19.
  18. Strategies of Polemics in Greek and Roman Philosophy.Sharon Weisser & Naly Thaler (eds.) - 2016 - Brill.
    This volume brings together eleven papers written by specialists of ancient philosophy, focusing on philosophical polemics from the Classical to the Roman period, by way of Hellenistic philosophy.
  19. Passions and Perceptions: Studies in Hellenistic Philosophy of Mind.Jacques Brunschwig & Martha C. Nussbaum (eds.) - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    The philosophers of the Hellenistic schools in ancient Greece and Rome made important contributions to the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of psychology. This volume, which contains the proceedings of the Fifth Symposium Hellenisticum, describes and analyses their contributions on issues such as: the nature of perception, imagination and belief; the nature of the passions and their role in action; the relationship between mind and body; freedom and determinism; the role of pleasure as a goal; the effects of poetry (...)
  20. Epicureanism: A Very Short Introduction.Catherine Wilson - 2015 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Epicureanism is commonly associated with a carefree view of life and the pursuit of pleasures, particularly the pleasures of the table. However it was a complex and distinctive system of philosophy that emphasized simplicity and moderation, and considered nature to consist of atoms and the void. Epicureanism is a school of thought whose legacy continues to reverberate today.In this Very Short Introduction, Catherine Wilson explains the key ideas of the School, comparing them with those of the rival Stoics and with (...)
  21. 5. The Epicurean and Skeptic Ways of Life.John M. Cooper - 2012 - In Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus. Princeton University Press. pp. 226-304.
  22. Stoicismo, Epicureismo E Letteratura.Alberto Grilli - 1992
  23. Logica, Mente E Persona Studi Sulla Filosofia Antica.Antonina M. Alberti, Jonathan Barnes, Anna Maria Ioppolo & Christopher Kirwan - 1990
  24. Epicureanism Two Collections of Fragments and Studies.Alfred Körte, Vincenzo De Falco & Metrodorus - 1987
  25. The Physical Constitution of the Epicurean Gods.Walter Scott - 1883
  26. Jacques Brunschwig, "Papers in Hellenistic Philosophy". [REVIEW]Brad Inwood - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (4):683.
  27. Teaching of Cicero and Vergil.M. B. Ogle - 1927 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 21:3-4.
  28. Epicureanism and Science.B. Farrington - 1954 - Scientia 48 (89):69.
  29. Death.Cardinal Mercati - 1957 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 51:54.
  30. Stoic and Epicurean Philosophers.A. L. Hammond - 1940 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 34:202-203.
  31. Felicitas.Mary Johnston - 1932 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 26:184.
  32. Bailey, C., Religion in Virgil. [REVIEW]Burriss Burriss - 1936 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 30:48-49.
  33. Bengtson, H., Die Strategie in der Hellenistischen Zeit, Vol. I. [REVIEW]Welles Welles - 1938 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 31:212-213.
  34. Icks, R. D.: Stoic and Epicurean. [REVIEW]Hadzsits Hadzsits - 1913 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 7:157-159.
  35. The Ides and the Garden.Mary Johnston - 1933 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 27:176.
  36. Miscellaneous Notes, Often Bibliographical in Character, Note 31.Charles Knapp - 1930 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 24:131.
  37. Catullus and Capito.Braunlich Braunlich - 1942 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 36:249.
  38. Argaitis.Pearl Pearl - 1943 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 37:165.
  39. Oxyrhynchus Papyri VI.Grenfell-Hunt Grenfell-Hunt - 1908 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 2:119.
  40. Live Unnoticed: On the Vicissitudes of an Epicurean Doctrine. [REVIEW]F. Verde - 2009 - Elenchos 30 (2):400-406.
  41. The Epicurean Theory of Knowledge.David Kenneth Glidden - 1971 - Dissertation, Princeton University
  42. Sceptics and Epicureans: A Discussion of M. Gigante, "Scetticismo E Epicureismo". [REVIEW]D. Fowler - 1984 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 2:237.
  43. De Rerum Natura, Libri Vii, Viii, Ix.Bernardino Telesio - 1976 - La Nuova Italia.
  44. Science and Speculation Studies in Hellenistic Theory and Practice /Edited by Jonathan Barnes ... [Et Al.]. --. --.Jonathan Barnes & France) Hellenistic Philosophy and Science Paris - 1982 - Cambridge University Press Editions de la Maison des Sciences de l'Homme, 1982.
  45. Cinismo E Epicureismo.Marcello Gigante - 1992
  46. Matter and Metaphysics Fourth Symposium Hellenisticum.Jonathan Barnes & Mario Mignucci - 1988
  47. The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy.G. L. Huxley - 2001 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 9 (2):247-260.
  48. Epicurean Science.A. Wasserstein - 1978 - Hermes 106 (3):484-494.
  49. Icks's Stoic and Epicurean. [REVIEW]Paul Shorey - 1911 - Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):50.
  50. The Philosophy of the Ancients. Vol. III: Stoicism, Epicureanism and Scepticism. [REVIEW]Joachim Thiel - 1987 - Philosophy and History 20 (2):128-128.
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