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  1. Approach, Interactive, 203 Approach, Practice Oriented, 86.Hegel’S. Absolute - 2012 - In Judith M. Green, Stefan Neubert & Kersten Reich (eds.), Pragmatism and Diversity: Dewey in the Context of Late Twentieth Century Debates. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 75--233.
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  2. A Review of "Disability & Justice: The Capabilities Approach in Practice", by Christopher A. Riddle. [REVIEW]Alexander Agnello - 2014 - Dialogue 7:1-3.
  3. Martha C. Nussbaum, Creating Capabilities: The Human Development Approach (Cambridge, Massachusetts: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2011), 237 Pp. ISBN: 9780674050549. $22.95 (Hbk.). [REVIEW]Jaime Ahlberg - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):552-554.
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  4. Ending the Liberal Hegemony: Republican Freedom and Amartya Sen's Theory of Capabilities.John M. Alexander - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):5-24.
    While being generally appreciative of Sen's theory of capabilities, the point of this paper is to raise some conceptual challenges that arise in addressing entrenched conditions of power and domination from the capability paradigm. The enhancement of people's capability prospects with regard to education, employment, decent living standards and political participation can empower them to challenge various dominating conditions in society. It can also bestow a sense of self-confidence in people to stand up against discriminating practices. Yet, the objectives of (...)
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  5. Non-Reductionist Naturalism: Nussbaum Between Aristotle and Hume.John M. Alexander - 2005 - Res Publica 11 (2):157-183.
    Martha Nussbaum proposes a universal list of human capabilities as the basis for fundamental political principles. She claims that the list, in an Aristotelian spirit, might be justified by an ongoing inquiry into valuable human functionings for the good life. Here I argue that the attractiveness of Nussbaum’s theory crucially depends on the philosophical possibility of a non-reductionist understanding of naturalism and on resolving the tensions between ethical and political aspects of the role of capabilities. Through a comparison of Nussbaum’s (...)
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  6. Capability Egalitarianism and Moral Selfhood.John M. Alexander - 2003 - Ethical Perspectives 10 (1):3-21.
    Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum advocate that a person’s quality of life and equal standing in society should be evaluated in terms of capabilities rather than utility, income or resources.In this article, I critically examine the concept of the person that underpins the capability approach. I argue that the ideal of equality of capability articulates a ‘non-utilitarian’ and ‘non-liberal’ view of the self.
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  7. Needs and Capabilities.Sabina Alkire - 2005 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (57):229-.
  8. Needs and Capabilities.Sabina Alkire - 2005 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 57:229-252.
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  9. The Capabilities Conception of the Individual.John B. Davis and - unknown
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  10. Justifying the Capabilities Approach to Justice.Elizabeth Anderson - unknown
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  11. Pluralism, Preferences, and Deliberation: A Critique of Sen's Constructive Argument for Democracy.Carlo Argenton & Enzo Rossi - 2013 - Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):129-145.
    In this paper we argue that Sen's defence of liberal democracy suffers from a moralistic and pro-liberal bias that renders it unable to take pluralism as seriously as it professes to do. That is because Sen’s commitment to respecting pluralism is not matched by his account of how to individuate the sorts of preferences that ought to be included in democratic deliberation. Our argument generalises as a critique of the two most common responses to the fact of pluralism in contemporary (...)
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  12. Book Review: Disadvantage, Capability, Commensurability, and Policy. [REVIEW]R. J. Arneson - 2010 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (3):339-357.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  13. Two Cheers for Capabilities.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    What is the best standard of interpersonal comparison for a broadly egalitarian theory of social justice?1 A broadly egalitarian theory is one that holds that justice requires that institutions and individual actions should be arranged to improve, to some degree, the quality of life of those who are worse off than others, or very badly off, or both.2 I shall add the specification that to qualify as broadly egalitarian, the theory must in some circumstances require action to aid the worse (...)
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  14. Egalitarianism.Richard Arneson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  15. From Primary Goods to Capabilities to Well-Being.Richard J. Arneson - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (2):179-195.
    Amartya Sen?s The Idea of Justice (2009) mistakenly characterizes transcendental accounts of justice as being unable to compare non-ideal alternatives, and thus misfires as a criticism of Robert Nozick and John Rawls. In fact, Nozick?s disinterest in when rights may be overridden does not bespeak indifference to specific questions of comparative assessment, and Lockean rights do give determinate advice in everyday circumstances. Sen correctly reports that Rawls?s theory is defective at giving practical normative advice, but the basic problem is the (...)
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  16. Commentary on Jorge Buzaglo ‘Expanding Human Capabilities: Lange’s “Observations” Updated for the 21st Century’.Paul Auerbach - 2016 - Economic Thought 5 (2):12.
    Read Jorge Buzaglo's paper 'Expanding Human Capabilities: Lange's "Observations" Updated for the 21st Century' ›...
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  17. Book Review:Women, Culture and Development: A Study of Human Capabilities. Martha Nussbaum, Jonathan Glover. [REVIEW]Neera K. Badhwar - 1997 - Ethics 107 (4):725-.
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  18. The Capability Approach and Political Economy of Human Development.Amiya Kumar Bagchi - 2008 - In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oxford University Press.
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  19. Martha C. Nussbaum and Amartya Sen , "The Quality of Life". [REVIEW]John Baker - 1995 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (1):201.
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  20. Natural Deficiency or Social Oppression? The Capabilities Approach to Justice for People with Disabilities.Linda Barclay - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):500-520.
    Theories of distributive justice are often criticised for either excluding people with disabilities from the domain of justice altogether, or casting them as deficient in personal attributes. I argue that the capabilities approach to justice is largely immune to these flaws. It has the conceptual resources to locate most of the causes of disadvantage in the interaction between a person and her environment and in doing so can characterise the disadvantages of disability in a way that avoids the imputation of (...)
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  21. What Kind of Liberal is Martha Nussbaum?Linda Barclay - 2003 - SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2).
  22. Improvement to the Data Logging Capability of a Cough Monitoring System.Matthew Barlow, Vasundara V. Varadan & Jia Di - 2007 - Inquiry 8.
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  23. Sen is Not a Capability Theorist.Antoinette Baujard & Muriel Gilardone - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 24 (1):1-19.
    This paper aims to clarify the status of capability in Sen’s idea of justice. Sen’s name is so widely associated with the concept of capability that commentators often assume that his contribution to the study of justice amounts to a capability theory, albeit underdeveloped. We argue that such a reading is misleading. Taking Sen’s reticence about operationalization seriously, we show that his contribution is inconsistent with a capability theory. Instead, we defend the idea that the capability approach plays a heuristic (...)
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  24. On Human Capability.Ron Beadle & Martyn Dyer-Smith - 2001 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 3 (1):1 - 27.
    Ron Beadle and Martyn Dyer-Smith discuss the understanding of human capability posited by two elitist thinkers: Elliott Jaques and Ayn Rand. They review Rand's ideas in this area, present Jaques's contributions in his own field, and compare their approaches. They find that both view individuals' abilities to plan over time as a key discriminator.
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  25. Tragedy and the Philosophical Life: A Response to Martha Nussbaum.Martha Beck - 2007 - Lyceum 8:34-46.
  26. Capabilities for All?Jessica Begon - 2017 - Social Theory and Practice 43 (1):154-179.
    The capability approach aims to ensure all individuals are able to form and pursue their own conception of the good, whilst the state remains neutral between them, and has done much to include oppressed and marginalised groups. Liberal neutrality and social inclusivity are worthy goals, yet I argue that Martha Nussbaum’s influential formulation of the capability approach, at least, cannot meet them. Conceptualising capabilities as opportunities to perform specific, valuable functionings fails to accommodate those who do not value, or cannot (...)
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  27. Athletic Policy, Passive Well-Being: Defending Freedom in the Capability Approach.Jessica Begon - 2016 - Economics and Philosophy 32 (1):51-73.
    The capability approach was developed as a response to the ‘equality of what?’ question, which asks what the metric of equality should be. The alternative answers are, broadly, welfare, resources or capabilities. G.A. Cohen has raised influential criticisms of this last response. He suggests that the capability approach’s focus on individuals’ freedom – their capability to control their own lives – renders its view of well-being excessively ‘athletic’, ignoring benefits achieved passively, without the active involvement of the benefitted individual. However, (...)
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  28. Why Women Hug Their Chains: Wollstonecraft and Adaptive Preferences.Sandrine Berges - 2011 - Utilitas (1):72-87.
    In a recent article, Amartya Sen writes that one important influence on his theory of adaptive preferences is Wollstonecraft's account of how some women, though clearly oppressed, are apparently satisfied with their lot. Wollstonecraft's arguments have received little attention so far from contemporary political philosophers, and one might be tempted to dismiss Sen's acknowledgment as a form of gallantry. That would be wrong. Wollstonecraft does have a lot of interest to say on the topic of why her contemporaries appeared to (...)
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  29. Why the Capability Approach is Justified.Sandrine Berges - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):16–25.
    Sen and Nussbaum's capability approach has in the past twenty years become an increasingly popular and influential approach to issues in global justice. Its main tenet is that when assessing quality of life or asking what kind of policies will be more conducive to human development, we should look not to resources or preference satisfaction, but to what people are able to be and to do. This should then be measured against a more or less narrow conception of what any (...)
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  30. 14 Social Capital and the Capability Approach.Alexandre L. Bertin & Nicolas Sirven - 2006 - In Betsy Jane Clary, Wilfred Dolfsma & Deborah M. Figart (eds.), Ethics and the Market: Insights From Social Economics. Routledge. pp. 191.
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  31. Equality, Freedom, and/or Justice for All: A Response to Martha Nussbaum.Michael Bérubé - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):352-365.
  32. Humanity, Virtue, Justice: A Framework for a Capability Approach.Benjamin James Bessey - unknown
    This Thesis reconsiders the prospects for an approach to global justice centring on the proposal that every human being should possess a certain bundle of goods, which would include certain members of a distinctive category: the category of capabilities. My overall aim is to present a clarified and well-developed framework, within which such claims can be made. To do this, I visit a number of regions of normative and metanormative theorising. I begin by introducing the motivations for the capability approach, (...)
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  33. Nussbaum's 'Capabilites Approach'.Andrew Bloodworth - 2006 - Nursing Philosophy 7 (1):58–60.
  34. Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. By Martha Nussbaum.M. J. Boxer - 2002 - The European Legacy 7 (4):507-507.
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  35. The Quality of Life, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum.Samantha Brennan - unknown
  36. Martha C. Nussbaum and Amartya Sen, Eds., The Quality of Life. [REVIEW]Samantha Brennan - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14:340-342.
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  37. Commentary on Nussbaum.Dan W. Brock - 1985 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 1 (1):202-207.
  38. The Capabilities Approach, Religious Practices, and the Importance of Recognition.Thom Brooks - manuscript
    When can ever be justified in banning a religious practice? This paper focusses on Martha Nussbaum's capabilities approach. Certain religious practices create a clash between capabilities where the capability to religious belief and expression is in conflict with the capability of equal status and nondiscrimination. One example of such a clash is the case of polygamy. Nussbaum argues that there may be circumstances where polygamy may be acceptable. On the contrary, I argue that the capabilities approach cannot justify polygamy in (...)
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  39. A New Problem with the Capabilities Approach.Thom Brooks - 2014 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 20:100-106.
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  40. A New Approach.Thom Brooks - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 54 (54):110-111.
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  41. Respect for Nature: The Capabilities Approach.Thom Brooks - 2011 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 14 (2):143 - 146.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 143-146, June 2011.
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  42. Rawls's Political Liberalism.Thom Brooks & Martha C. Nussbaum (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Widely hailed as one of the most significant works in modern political philosophy, John Rawls's _Political Liberalism_ defended a powerful vision of society that respects reasonable ways of life, both religious and secular. These core values have never been more critical as anxiety grows over political and religious difference and new restrictions are placed on peaceful protest and individual expression. This anthology of original essays suggests new, groundbreaking applications of Rawls's work in multiple disciplines and contexts. Thom Brooks, Martha Nussbaum, (...)
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  43. Elements of Eudaimonia: Capabilities and Functionings.Kirsten Brukamp - 2001 - In Angela Kallhoff (ed.), Martha C. Nussbaum: Ethics and Political Philosophy: Lecture and Colloquium in Münster 2000. Distributed in North America by Transaction Publishers. pp. 4--93.
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  44. Well-Being, Capabilities and Philosophical Practice.Aleksandra Bulatovic - 2014 - Filozofija I Društvo 25 (4):105-120.
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  45. Which Dimensions Should Matter for Capabilities? A Constitutional Approach.Francesco Burchi, Pasquale De Muro & Eszter Kollar - 2014 - Ethics and Social Welfare 8 (3):233-247.
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  46. The Application of the Capabilities.Seetha Burtner - 2000 - Social Philosophy Today 15:275-292.
  47. Nussbaum's Capabilities Approach: Political Criticism and the Burden of Proof.Brian E. Butler - 2001 - International Journal of Politics and Ethics 1 (1):71-86.
  48. Expanding Human Capabilities: Lange’s “Observations” Updated for the 21st Century.Jorge Buzaglo - 2016 - Economic Thought 5 (2):1.
    Poland has produced two of the greatest economists of the past century, namely Michal Kalecki and Oskar Lange. Both worked with a wide and penetrating view of the economy and society, more typical of the great classical economists than of those of their own time. During the post-World War II 'Golden Age of Growth', while Keynes was the patron saint of economic theory and policy in the industrialised capitalist countries, Kalecki and Lange had a similar influence and role among the (...)
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  49. Coercion, Justification, and Inequality: Defending Global Egalitarianism.Simon Caney - 2015 - Ethics and International Affairs 29 (3):277-288.
    Michael Blake’s excellent book 'Justice and Foreign Policy' makes an important contribution to the ongoing debates about the kinds of values that should inform the foreign policy of liberal states. In this paper I evaluate his defence of the view that egalitarianism applies within the state but not globally. I discuss two arguments he gives for this claim - one appealing to the material preconditions of democracy and the other grounded in a duty to justify coercive power. I argue that (...)
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  50. Justice and the Distribution of Greenhouse Gas Emissions.Simon Caney - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (2):125-146.
    The prospect of dangerous climate change requires Humanity to limit the emission of greenhouse gases. This in turn raises the question of how the permission to emit greenhouse gases should be distributed and among whom. In this article the author criticises three principles of distributive justice that have often been advanced in this context. He also argues that the predominantly statist way in which the question is framed occludes some morally relevant considerations. The latter part of the article turns from (...)
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