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  1. Well-Being and Fair Distribution: Beyond Cost-Benefit Analysis.Matthew D. Adler - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This book addresses a range of relevant theoretical issues, including the possibility of an interpersonally comparable measure of well-being, or “utility” metric; the moral value of equality, and how that bears on the form of the social welfare function; social choice under uncertainty; and the possibility of integrating considerations of individual choice and responsibility into the social-welfare-function framework. This book also deals with issues of implementation, and explores how survey data and other sources of evidence might be used to calibrate (...)
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  2. Luck Egalitarianism, Social Determinants and Public Health Initiatives.A. Albertsen - 2015 - Public Health Ethics 8 (1):42-49.
    People’s health is hugely affected by where they live, their occupational status and their socio-economic position. It has been widely argued that the presence of such social determinants in health provides good reasons to reject luck egalitarianism as a theory of distributive justice in health. The literature provides different reasons why this responsibility-sensitive theory of distributive justice should not be applied to health. The critiques submit that the social circumstances undermine or remove people’s responsibility for their health; responsibility sensitive health (...)
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  3. A Framework for Luck Egalitarianism in Health and Healthcare.A. Albertsen & C. Knight - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):165-169.
    Several attempts have been made to apply the choice-sensitive theory of distributive justice, luck egalitarianism, in the context of health and healthcare. This article presents a framework for this discussion by highlighting different normative decisions to be made in such an application, some of the objections to which luck egalitarians must provide answers and some of the practical implications associated with applying such an approach in the real world. It is argued that luck egalitarians should address distributions of health rather (...)
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  4. Unjust Equalities.Andreas Albertsen & Sören Flinch Midtgaard - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):335-346.
    In the luck egalitarian literature, one influential formulation of luck egalitarianism does not specify whether equalities that do not reflect people’s equivalent exercises of responsibility are bad with regard to inequality. This equivocation gives rise to two competing versions of luck egalitarianism: asymmetrical and symmetrical luck egalitarianism. According to the former, while inequalities due to luck are unjust, equalities due to luck are not necessarily so. The latter view, by contrast, affirms the undesirability of equalities as well as inequalities insofar (...)
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  5. What Personal Responsibilities Facilitate the Construction of a Cultural Democracy? Involvement of the Public in the Construction of a Cultural Democracy.Alice Anberrée - 2012 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:261-272.
    In France a difference has been established between cultural popularization and cultural democracy. The former is aimed at spreading works of art in as large a way as possible; the latter emphasizes the participation of the public. From there, we argue that moving from cultural popularization towards cultural democracy can lead to a shift in responsibilities from professionals towards the general public. With reference to the theoretical background of reception, appropriation and participation, we lead a participant observation on three different (...)
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  6. What Does Society Owe Me If I Am Responsible for Being Worse Off?Martin Marchman Andersen - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (3):271-286.
    Luck egalitarians need to address the question of cost-responsibility: If an individual is responsible for being worse off than others, then what benefits, if any, is that individual uniquely cost-responsible for? By applying luck egalitarianism to justice in health I discuss different answers to this question inspired by two different interpretations of luck egalitarianism, namely ‘standard luck egalitarianism’ and ‘all luck egalitarianism’, respectively. Even though I argue that the latter is more plausible than the former, I ultimately suggest and defend (...)
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  7. Luck Egalitarianism, Universal Health Care, and Non-Responsibility-Based Reasons for Responsibilization.Martin Marchman Andersen & Morten Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2015 - Res Publica 21 (2):201-216.
    In recent literature, there has been much debate about whether and how luck egalitarianism, given its focus on personal responsibility, can justify universal health care. In this paper we argue that, whether or not this is so, and in fact whether or not egalitarianism should be sensitive to responsibility at all, the question of personal responsibilization for health is not settled. This is the case because whether or not individuals are responsible for their own health condition is not all that (...)
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  8. The Fundamental Disagreement Between Luck Egalitarians and Relational Egalitarians.Elizabeth Anderson - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (S1):1-23.
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  9. The Fundamental Disagreement Between Luck Egalitarians and Relational Egalitarians.Elizabeth Anderson - 2010 - In Colin M. Macleod (ed.), Justice and Equality. University of Calgary Press. pp. 1-23.
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  10. Kok-Chor Tan, Justice, Institutions, and Luck: The Site, Ground, and Scope of Equality.Chris Armstrong - 2013 - Social Theory and Practice 39 (4):695-701.
  11. Rethinking Luck Egalitarianism and Unacceptable Inequalities.Richard Arneson - 2012 - Philosophical Topics 40 (1):153-169.
    Luck egalitarianism is a social justice doctrine that holds that it is morally bad and unfair if some people are worse off than others through no fault or choice of their own. The doctrine has attracted criticisms. G. A. Cohen has defended luck egalitarianism without conceding ground to its critics by affirming that some inequalities that egalitarian justice principles do not condemn are nonetheless incompatible with an antimarket ideal of community that we should accept and—subject to feasibility constraints—implement. This essay (...)
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  12. Luck Egalitarianism–A Primer.Richard Arneson - 2011 - In Carl Knight & Zofia Stemplowska (eds.), Responsibility and Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press. pp. 24--50.
  13. Egalitarianism.Richard Arneson - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  14. Luck Egalitarianism Interpretated and Defended.Richard Arneson - 2004 - Philosophical Topics 32 (1/2):1-20.
    In recent years some moral philosophers and political theorists, who have come to be called “luck egalitarians,” have urged that the essence of social justice is the moral imperative to improve the condition of people who suffer from simple bad luck. Prominent theorists who have attracted the luck egalitarian label include Ronald Dworkin, G. A. Cohen, and John Roemer.1 Larry Temkin should also be included in this group, as should Thomas Nagel at the time that he wrote Equality and Partiality.2 (...)
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  15. Luck and Equality.Richard Arneson - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75:51-90.
    [Susan Hurley] I argue that the aim to neutralize the influence of luck on distribution cannot provide a basis for egalitarianism: it can neither specify nor justify an egalitarian distribution. Luck and responsibility can play a role in determining what justice requires to be redistributed, but from this we cannot derive how to distribute: we cannot derive a pattern of distribution from the 'currency' of distributive justice. I argue that the contrary view faces a dilemma, according to whether it understands (...)
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  16. Egalitarianism and Responsibility.Richard Arneson - 1999 - Journal of Ethics 3 (3):225-247.
    Richard J. Arneson May, 1999 The problem of social justice can arise in the absence of social interaction. This point emerges directly from an important passage in John Rawls’s A Theory of Justice where he is arguing for an opposed conclusion. Rawls argues that the primary subject of justice is the basic structure of society, the way that major social institutions work together to “determine the division of advantages from social cooperation.” He writes, “The basic structure is the primary subject (...)
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  17. Luck and Equality: Richard J. Arneson.Richard J. Arneson - 2001 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (1):73–90.
  18. Luck Egalitarianism and Prioritarianism.Richard J. Arneson - 2000 - Ethics 110 (2):339-349.
    In her recent, provocative essay “What Is the Point of Equality?”, Elizabeth Anderson argues against a common ideal of egalitarian justice that she calls “ luck egalitarianism” and in favor of an approach she calls “democratic equality.”1 According to the luck egalitarian, the aim of justice as equality is to eliminate so far as is possible the impact on people’s lives of bad luck that falls on them through no fault or choice of their own. In the ideal luck egalitarian (...)
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  19. Egalitarianism and Responsibility.Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - Journal of Ethics 3 (3):225-247.
    This essay examines several possible rationales for the egalitarian judgment that justice requires better-off individuals to help those who are worse off even in the absence of social interaction. These rationales include equality (everyone should enjoy the same level of benefits), moral meritocracy (each should get benefits according to her responsibility or deservingness), the threshold of sufficiency (each should be assured a minimally decent quality of life), prioritarianism (a function of benefits to individuals should be maximized that gives priority to (...)
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  20. Egalitarianism and the Undeserving Poor.Richard J. Arneson - 1997 - Journal of Political Philosophy 5 (4):327–350.
    Recently in the U.S. a near-consensus has formed around the idea that it would be desirable to "end welfare as we know it," in the words of President Bill Clinton.1 In this context, the term "welfare" does not refer to the entire panoply of welfare state provision including government sponsored old age pensions, government provided medical care for the elderly, unemployment benefits for workers who have lost their jobs without being fired for cause, or aid to the disabled. "Welfare" in (...)
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  21. Egalitarianism.Iep Author - 2016
    Egalitarianism Are all persons of equal moral worth? Is variation in income and wealth just? Does it matter that the allocation of income and wealth is shaped by undeserved luck? No one deserves the family into which they are born, their innate abilities, or their starting place in society, yet these have a dramatic impact … Continue reading Egalitarianism →.
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  22. Taking Responsibility for Community Violence.Alison Bailey - 2001 - In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), FEMINISTS DOING ETHICS.
    This article examines the responses of two communities to hate crimes in their cities. In particular it explores how community understandings of responsibility shape collective responses to hate crimes. I use the case of Bridesberg, Pennsylvania to explore how anti-racist work is restricted by backward-looking conceptions of moral responsibility (e.g. being responsible). Using recent writings in feminist ethics.(1) I argue for a forward-looking notion that advocates an active view: taking responsibility for attitudes and behaviors that foster climates in which hate (...)
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  23. Egalitarianism and Responsibility in the Genetic Future.Linda Barclay - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (2):119-134.
    Recent discussions of genetic enhancement have argued that unregulated access to genetic enhancement technology will have a mainly negative impact on equality, a development that an egalitarian approach to distributive justice should be concerned with and seek to address. I argue that the extent to which egalitarians should be concerned about unequal access to genetic enhancement therapies has been overplayed. Many of the genetic differences that exist between people, including those that arise from differential access to genetic enhancement technology, are (...)
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  24. Luck and Decision.Will Barrett - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):73–87.
    Much recent work on moral responsibility and on distributive justice has addressed the concept of luck. Very little attention has been given to the relation of luck to rationality. How does luck bear on our choices? Can beliefs about luck lead to unwise decisions? These questions have particular relevance for understanding gambling behaviour, and for public policy on gambling. In this paper I argue that no one is reliably lucky, and that projecting luck can undermine rational decision-making. I give various (...)
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  25. Defending Luck Egalitarianism.Nicholas Barry - 2006 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (1):89–107.
  26. Justice, Institutions, and Luck.Michael Blake - 2016 - Philosophical Review 125 (1):148-151.
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  27. Equality, Responsibility, and the Law.Nathan Brett - 2002 - Dialogue 41 (4):823-825.
  28. S. L. Hurley, Justice, Luck and Knowledge:Justice, Luck and Knowledge.Dan W. Brock - 2006 - Ethics 116 (2):428-432.
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  29. Redistribution Without Egalitarianism.Baruch Brody - 1983 - Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (1):71.
    I will, in this paper, set out the philosophical foundations and the basic structure of a new theory of justice. I will argue that both these foundations and the theory which is based upon them are intuitively attractive and theoretically sound. Finally, I will argue that both are supported by the fact that they lead to attractive implications such as the following: One can justify at least some governmental redistributive programs which presuppose that those receiving the wealth have a right (...)
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  30. Ethics and Moral Philosophy.Thom Brooks (ed.) - 2011 - Brill.
    Ethics and moral philosophy is an area of particular interest today. This book brings together some of the most important essays in this area.
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  31. Luck Egalitarianism and Democratic Equality.Alexander Brown - 2005 - Ethical Perspectives 12 (3):293-340.
    The paper critically examines a series of objections to luck egalitarianism raised by Elizabeth Anderson in her essay “What is the Point of Equality?” According to Anderson, current egalitarian writing has come to be dominated by the distinction between choice and brute luck and that strict adherence to this distinction will mean treating some people in ways we have other egalitarian reasons not to want to treat them.A case is made for moving the debate on by adopting a pluralistic view (...)
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  32. The Struggle for Climate Justice in a Non‐Ideal World.Simon Caney - 2016 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 40 (1):9-26.
    Many agents have failed to comply with their responsibilities to take the action needed to avoid dangerous anthropogenic climate change. This pervasive noncompliance raises two questions of nonideal political theory. First, it raises the question of what agents should do when others do not discharge their climate responsibilities. (the Responsibility Question) In this paper I put forward four principles that we need to employ to answer the Responsibility Question (Sections II-V). I then illustrate my account, by outlining four kinds of (...)
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  33. Responsibility in Health Care: A Liberal Egalitarian Approach.A. W. Cappelen - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (8):476-480.
    Lifestyle diseases constitute an increasing proportion of health problems and this trend is likely to continue. A better understanding of the responsibility argument is important for the assessment of policies aimed at meeting this challenge. Holding individuals accountable for their choices in the context of health care is, however, controversial. There are powerful arguments both for and against such policies. In this article the main arguments for and the traditional arguments against the use of individual responsibility as a criterion for (...)
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  34. Disability Compensation and Responsibility.A. Cappelen, O. F. Norheim & B. Tungodden - 2010 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 9 (4):411-427.
    It is a central political goal to secure disabled individuals the same opportunities as others to pursue their conception of a good life. This goal reflects an ambition to combine an egalitarian and a liberal moral intuition. In this article, we analyse how disabled individuals who take part in economic activity should be compensated in order to respect these two intuitions. The article asks how a system of disability compensation should be structured and what the level of such compensation should (...)
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  35. A Liberal Egalitarian Paradox.Alexander W. Cappelen & Bertil Tungodden - 2006 - Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):393-408.
    A liberal egalitarian theory of justice seeks to combine the values of equality, personal freedom, and personal responsibility. It is considered a much more promising position than strict egalitarianism, because it supposedly provides a fairness argument for inequalities reflecting differences in choice. However, we show that it is inherently difficult to fulfill this ambition. We present a liberal egalitarian paradox which shows that there does not exist any robust reward system that satisfies a minimal egalitarian and a minimal liberal requirement. (...)
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  36. Relocating the Responsibility Cut: Should More Responsibility Imply Less Redistribution?Alexander W. Cappelen & Bertil Tungodden - 2006 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (3):353-362.
    Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration and Chr. Michelsen Institute, Norway, bertil.tungodden{at}nhh.no ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Liberal egalitarian theories of justice argue that inequalities arising from non-responsibility factors should be eliminated, but that inequalities arising from responsibility factors should be accepted. This article discusses how the fairness argument for redistribution within a liberal egalitarian framework is affected by a relocation of the cut between responsibility and non-responsibility factors. The article also discusses the claim (...)
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  37. Health, Luck and Moral Fallacies of the Second Best.Eric Cavallero - 2011 - Journal of Ethics 15 (4):387-403.
    Individuals who become ill as a result of personal lifestyle choices often shift the monetary costs of their healthcare needs to the taxpaying public or to fellow members of a private insurance pool. Some argue that policies permitting such cost shifting are unfair. Arguments for this view may seem to draw support from luck egalitarian accounts of distributive justice. This essay argues that the luck egalitarian framework provides no such support. To allocate healthcare costs on the basis of personal responsibility (...)
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  38. Justice and Luck.Jeffrey M. Cervantez - 2011 - Southwest Philosophy Review 27 (1):37-45.
  39. Egalitarian and Utopian Traditions in the East.J. Chesneaux - 1968 - Diogenes 16 (62):76-102.
  40. A Foundation for Egalitarianism.Thomas Christiano - 2007 - In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press. pp. 41--82.
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  41. Fairness and Legitimacy in Justice, And: Does Option Luck Ever Preserve Justice?G. A. Cohen - 2009 - In Stephen De Wijze, Matthew H. Kramer & Ian Carter (eds.), Hillel Steiner and the Anatomy of Justice: Themes and Challenges. Routledge.
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  42. Chapter Five. Luck and Equality.G. A. H. G. Cohen - 2011 - In On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 116-123.
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  43. Chapter Six. Fairness and Legitimacy in Justice, And: Does Option Luck Ever Preserve Justice?G. A. H. G. Cohen - 2011 - In On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, and Other Essays in Political Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 124-144.
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  44. Private Schools in the Perspective of a Reasonable Egalitarian.John Colbeck - 1984 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 18 (1):129–132.
  45. Disadvantage, Autonomy, and the Continuity Test.Ben Colburn - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (3):254-270.
    The Continuity Test is the principle that a proposed distribution of resources is wrong if it treats someone as disadvantaged when they don't see it that way themselves, for example by offering compensation for features that they do not themselves regard as handicaps. This principle — which is most prominently developed in Ronald Dworkin's defence of his theory of distributive justice — is an attractive one for a liberal to endorse as part of her theory of distributive justice and disadvantage. (...)
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  46. Responsibility and School Choice in Education.Ben Colburn - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (2):207-222.
    Consider the following argument for school choice, based on an appeal to the virtues of the market: allowing parents some measure of choice over their particular children's education ultimately serves the interests of all children, because creating a market mechanism in state education will produce improvements through the same pressures that lead to greater efficiency and quality when markets are deployed in more familiar contexts. The argument fails, because it is committed to a principle of equal concern, which implies that (...)
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  47. Autonomy and Liberalism.Ben Colburn - 2010 - New York, USA: Routledge.
    This book concerns the foundations and implications of a particular form of liberal political theory. Colburn argues that one should see liberalism as a political theory committed to the value of autonomy, understood as consisting in an agent deciding for oneself what is valuable and living life in accordance with that decision. Understanding liberalism this way offers solutions to various problems that beset liberal political theory, on various levels. On the theoretical level, Colburn claims that this position is the only (...)
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  48. Hypothetical Insurance and Higher Education.Ben Colburn & Hugh Lazenby - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (4):587-604.
    What level of government subsidy of higher education is justified, in what form, and for what reasons? We answer these questions by applying the hypothetical insurance approach, originally developed by Ronald Dworkin in his work on distributive justice. On this approach, when asking how to fund and deliver public services in a particular domain, we should seek to model what would be the outcome of a hypothetical insurance market: we stipulate that participants lack knowledge about their specific resources and risks, (...)
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  49. Egalitarianism and the Problem of Tort Liability.Michael L. Corrado - 2001 - Noûs 35 (s1):388-419.
    Is the negligence standard in accident law acceptable to the egalitarian? The egalitarian - the egalitarian who would compensate only losses for which the actor was not responsible - cannot accept either a system of strict liability for all accidents or a system of social insurance for all accidents. A system of tort law acceptable to the responsibility - egalitarian must be a system based on negligence. But what will negligence mean? A negligence system in which the notion of reasonableness (...)
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  50. Luck Egalitarianism and What Valuing Responsibility Requires.Alexandra Couto - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-25.
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