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  1. 4 Equality of What?Alex Callinicos - forthcoming - Contemporary Political Theory: A Reader.
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  2. The Quest for a Moral Compass: A Global History of Ethics.Derek Clifford - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-3.
  3. The Meek and the Mighty: Two Models of Oppression.Yuna Blajer de la Garza - forthcoming - Sage Publications: European Journal of Political Theory.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print. This article is an exercise in theory-building about the stories that justify, feed upon, and reproduce systems of oppression. I argue that emotional narratives contribute to the constitution and reproduction of systems of oppression, and that different emotional narratives constitute different forms of oppression. I examine two of these emotional narratives: a narrative articulated around pity and a narrative that draws on fear. I propose that the former prevails when those in power (...)
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  4. Educational Adequacy and Educational Equality: A Merging Proposal.Fernando de los Santos Menéndez - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-22.
  5. Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in Advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  6. Introduction for Book Symposium on Andrea Sangiovanni’s Humanity Without Dignity.Johannes Haaf, Jan-Philipp Kruse & Luise K. Müller - forthcoming - European Journal of Political Theory:147488511989007.
    European Journal of Political Theory, Ahead of Print.
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  7. Political Justice and the Capability for Responsibility.Yuko Kamishima - forthcoming - Tandf: Critical Horizons:1-16.
  8. Free to Be You and Me: An Introduction to Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Patti Tamara Lenard - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-8.
  9. Colonialism, Territory and Pre-Existing Obligations.Cara Nine - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-11.
  10. Civil Liability and the 50%+ Standard of Proof.Martin Smith - forthcoming - International Journal of Evidence and Proof.
    The standard of proof applied in civil trials is the preponderance of evidence, often said to be met when a proposition is shown to be more than 50% likely to be true. A number of theorists have argued that this 50%+ standard is too weak – there are circumstances in which a court should find that the defendant is not liable, even though the evidence presented makes it more than 50% likely that the plaintiff’s claim is true. In this paper, (...)
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  11. On Being Good Gay: ‘Covering’ and the Social Structure of Being LGBT+.Annamari Vitikainen - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-8.
  12. The Significance of Being Gay in Ghosh’s De-Moralizing Gay Rights.Kerri Woods - forthcoming - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy:1-7.
  13. What Makes Epistemic Injustice an “Injustice”?Morten Fibieger Byskov - 2021 - Journal of Social Philosophy 52 (1):114-131.
  14. What Liberals Should Tolerate Internationally.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):64-86.
  15. The Politics and Ethics of Toleration: Introduction.Johannes Drerup & Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):1-4.
  16. Toleration and Modus Vivendi.John Horton - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):45-63.
  17. Can a Value-Neutral Liberal State Still Be Tolerant?Michael Kühler - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (1):25-44.
  18. Inequality, Loneliness, and Political Appearance: Picturing Radical Democracy with Hannah Arendt and Jacques Rancière.Andrew Schaap - 2021 - Political Theory 49 (1):28-53.
    Radical democrats highlight dramatic moments of political action, which disrupt everyday habits of perception that sustain unequal social relations. In doing so, however, we sometimes neglect how social conditions—such as precarious employment, social dislocation, and everyday exposure to violence—undermine political agency or might be contested in uneventful ways. Despite their differences, two thinkers who have significantly influenced radical democratic theory have been similarly criticized for contributing to such a socially weightless picture of politics. However, attending to how they are each (...)
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  19. The Limits of Liberal Integrity.Jeff Spinner-Halev - 2021 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 24 (4):635-641.
  20. Racial Conflation: Agency, Black Action, and Criminal Intent.Alisa Bierria - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy.
  21. The Ethical Imperatives of the COVID 19 Pandemic: A Review From Data Ethics.Gabriela Arriagada Bruneau, Vincent C. Müller & Mark S. Gilthorpe - 2020 - Veritas: Revista de Filosofía y Teología 46:13-35.
    In this review, we present some ethical imperatives observed in this pandemic from a data ethics perspective. Our exposition connects recurrent ethical problems in the discipline, such as, privacy, surveillance, transparency, accountability, and trust, to broader societal concerns about equality, discrimination, and justice. We acknowledge data ethics role as significant to develop technological, inclusive, and pluralist societies. - - - Resumen: En esta revisión, exponemos algunos de los imperativos éticos observados desde la ética de datos en esta pandemia. Nuestra exposición (...)
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  22. The Good of Toleration: Changing Social Relations or Maximising Individual Freedom?Emanuela Ceva - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (2):197-202.
    In this paper, I take issue with Peter Balint’s recent account of the value of toleration as an instrument for securing freedom-maximising outcomes in pluralistic societies. In particular, I question the extent to which the ideal of toleration can be entirely reduced to someone’s intentional withholding of negative interference whose value lies in the protection of individual negative freedoms. I argue that couching the value of toleration entirely in these freedom-maximising terms fails to do justice to the relational value of (...)
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  23. Complicity and Hypocrisy.Nicolas Cornell & Amy Sepinwall - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (2):154-181.
    This article offers a justification for accommodating claims of conscience. The standard justification points to the pain that acting against one’s conscience entails. But that defense cannot make sense of the state’s refusal to accommodate individuals where the law interferes with their deeply meaningful but nonmoral projects. An alternative justification, we argue, arises once one recognizes the connection between conscience and moral address: One’s lived moral convictions determine when and with what force one can hold others to account. Acting against (...)
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  24. Against Hands-on Neutrality.Bouke De Vries - 2020 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (4):424-446.
    In recent years, several theorists have defended a form of neutrality that seeks to equalise the benefits that state policies bestow upon citizens’ conceptions of the good life. For example, when state policies confer special benefits upon a conception that revolves around a particular culture, religion or type of sports, other cultures, religions or types of sports might be due compensation. This article argues that this kind of neutrality – which I refer to as ‘hands-on neutrality’ – cannot be vindicated, (...)
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  25. Species-being for whom? The five faces of interspecies oppression.Mathieu Dubeau - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):596-620.
    There is now an awakening to and recognition of the emotionally complex lives of some non-human animals. While their forms of consciousness may vary, some are indeed conscious and deserve political consideration. What that political consideration ought to be is the central topic of this article. First, I argue that interspecies justice must be understood in terms of the relationships that foster individual flourishing of all concerned. The obstacles to such flourishing are the five faces of oppression famously identified by (...)
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  26. Democratic opening and closure: Struggles of (de)legitimation in the settler colony.Michael Elliott - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (1):83-104.
    A crucial imperative for decolonial praxis in the liberal settler colony is to radically delegitimise the prevailing social order. This is regarded as necessary to achieving genuinely decolonial forms of social transformation rather than merely the ongoing modification of colonial rule. I propose here, however, that such objectives depend not simply on delegitimising the colonial regime as such, but also on finding ways to expose and challenge its resources of legitimating power, that is, the capacity to shape and reshape perceptions (...)
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  27. A Liberal Egalitarian Perspective on the Platform Economy: Mitigating its Distributive Effects or Changing the Organizations Running It?Thomas Ferretti - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):54-79.
  28. Capability Without Dignity?Joseph J. Fischel & Claire McKinney - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (3):404-429.
    Dignity may just be the most promiscuous normative abstraction. This article, informed by dignity’s historical variability, political theoretic multipurpose, and conflicting jurisprudence, focuses on a particular but influential invocation of the term: dignity as the normative ground for the ‘capabilities approach’ model of social justice. We ask whether or not the CA, in particular the influential version propounded by philosopher Martha Nussbaum, requires dignity as its foundational premise, and whether or not dignity may be more costly than beneficial for the (...)
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  29. Democracy’s History of Inegalitarianism: Symposium on Michael Hanchard, The Spectre of Race: How Discrimination Haunts Western Democracy, Princeton University Press, 2018.Robert Gooding-Williams, David Theo Goldberg, Juliet Hooker & Michael G. Hanchard - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (3):357-377.
  30. The Economic Common Good and Institutions.Mary Hirschfeld - 2020 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 17 (1):7-17.
  31. Recognitive Arguments for Workplace Democracy.Onni Hirvonen & Keith Breen - 2020 - Constellations 27 (4):716-731.
  32. Levinas Between Recognition and Heterology.Terence Holden - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):17-33.
    ABSTRACTI extract a problematic from Levinas’ shifting attitude towards the idea of recognition. An underappreciated aspect of Levinas’ work is that at an early stage he appeals to a recognition-based model of intersubjectivity, which characteristically plots a relation of mutual affirmation between individuals. However, he later explicitly rejects this paradigm in favour of an intensified heterological orientation which invests in otherness as a value in itself. Levinas’ rejection of recognition raises the question of how we are to interpret the relation (...)
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  33. Pitting People Against Each Other.Waheed Hussain - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (1):79-113.
    Philosophy &Public Affairs, Volume 48, Issue 1, Page 79-113, Winter 2020.
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  34. Environmental Domination.Sharon R. Krause - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (4):443-468.
    In their vulnerability to arbitrary, exploitative uses of human power, many of Earth’s nonhuman parts are subject to environmental domination. People too are subject to environmental domination in ways that include but also extend beyond the special environmental burdens borne by those who are poor and marginalized. Despite the substantial inequalities that exist among us as human beings, we are all captured and exploited by the eco-damaging collective practices that constitute modern life for everyone today. Understanding the complex, interacting dynamics (...)
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  35. Pupils with Special Educational Needs: Experiencing Recognition in Individual Subject Curriculum Meetings.Janaina Hartveit Lie - 2020 - Constellations 27 (4):746-758.
  36. Vandalizing Tainted Commemorations.Chong-Ming Lim - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (2):185-216.
  37. Laborde’s Religion.Sune Lægaard - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (1):9-20.
  38. CHRISTUS St. Vincent Regional Medical Center.T. Dean Maines & Paul J. Wojda - 2020 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 17 (1):153-170.
  39. Machiavelli and the Orders of Violence. Yves Winter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018.John P. McCormick - 2020 - Constellations 27 (2):313-316.
  40. Engaging Vulnerabilities: An Outline for a Responsive and Responsible Theory.Mihaela Mihai - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (4):583-607.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  41. Built Power and the Politics of Nonhuman Rights.Joshua Mousie - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (1):80-103.
  42. Universal Concern, Contingency and the Single Practice Assumption: Sangiovanni’s Theory of Human Rights.Luise K. Müller & Johannes Haaf - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (3):426-432.
    Contribution for book symposium on Andrea Sangiovanni's Humanity without Dignity.
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  43. Being Realistic About Neoliberalism.Andrew Norris - 2020 - Constellations 27 (1):63-78.
  44. Whose Lives Matter? The Black Lives Matter Movement and the Contested Legacy of Philosophical Humanism.Andrew J. Pierce - 2020 - Journal of Social Philosophy 51 (2):261-282.
  45. Beyond Redistribution: Honneth, Recognition Theory and Global Justice.Renante D. Pilapil - 2020 - Critical Horizons 21 (1):34-48.
    ABSTRACTThis paper attempts to explore the ways through which the discourse on global justice can be expanded beyond the language of redistribution by utilizing the insights from the theory of recognition as proposed by Honneth. It looks into the potential contributions of recognition theory in the normative analysis of global poverty and inequality. Taking off from the argument that the focus on global redistributive justice is misleading, the paper makes three claims: firstly, any global justice discourse must take as its (...)
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  46. Geoengineering the Climate and Ethical Challenges: What We Can Learn From Moral Emotions and Art.Sabine Roeser, Behnam Taebi & Neelke Doorn - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (5):641-658.
  47. Replies.Andrea Sangiovanni - 2020 - European Journal of Political Theory 19 (3):433-441.
    In this article, I reply to Giacomo Floris, Adam Etinson, Daniel Corrigan, Luise Müller and Johannes Haaf.
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  48. Has liberalism ruined everything?Cass R. Sunstein - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (2):175-187.
    There has been considerable recent discussion of the social effects of “liberalism,” which are said to include a growth in out-of-wedlock childbirth, repudiation of traditions, a rise in populism, increased reliance on technocracy, inequality, environmental degradation, sexual promiscuity, deterioration of civic associations, a diminution of civic virtue, political correctness on university campuses, and a general sense of alienation. There is good reason for skepticism about these claims. Liberalism is not a person, and it is not an agent in history. Claims (...)
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  49. Distributing Responsibility.Victor Tadros - 2020 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 48 (3):223-261.
    A widespread view in moral, legal, and political philosophy, as well as in public discourse, is that responsibility makes a difference to the fair allocation or distribution of things that are valuable or disvaluable independently of responsibility. For example, the fairness of punishing a person for wrongdoing varies with her responsibility for wrongdoing; the fairness of requiring a person to pay compensation varies with her responsibility for the harm that she caused; the fairness of one person being worse off than (...)
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  50. Dirty Hands and the Fragility of Democracy.Berry Tholen - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (4):663-682.
    Dirty hands cases are often seen as a crucial challenge for political ethics. Michael Walzer’s analysis of dirty hands cases has been especially influential. On closer inspection, however, Walzer’s analysis contains some serious flaws. This article examines how and to what extent the political ethics of Paul Ricoeur can remedy the problems in Walzer’s approach. It is shown that Ricoeur’s approach can offer a better understanding of what is at stake in dilemmas in political action and that it can provide (...)
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