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1 — 50 / 675
  1. added 2019-02-04
    Autonomous Weapons Systems, Killer Robots and Human Dignity.Amanda Sharkey - forthcoming - Ethics and Information Technology.
  2. added 2019-02-01
    The Justification of Religious Violence, by Steve Clarke: Malden, MA: Wiley Blackwell, 2014, Pp. Xii + 259, US$29.95.Andrew Jason Cohen - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (1):206-206.
  3. added 2019-01-30
    Defensive Killing, by Frowe, Helen: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015, Pp. Xii + 227, £30. [REVIEW]Saba Bazargan - 2016 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 94 (3):608-611.
  4. added 2019-01-15
    “Saving Lives or Saving Stones?” The Ethics of Cultural Heritage Protection in War.Erich Hatala Matthes - 2018 - Public Affairs Quarterly 32 (1):67-84.
    In discussion surrounding the destruction of cultural heritage in armed conflict, one often hears two important claims in support of intervention to safeguard heritage. The first is that the protection of people and the protection of heritage are two sides of the same coin. The second is that the cultural heritage of any people is part of the common heritage of all humankind. In this article, I examine both of these claims, and consider the extent to which they align with (...)
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  5. added 2019-01-15
    Proportionality and Time.Jeff McMahan - 2015 - Ethics 125 (3):696-719.
    Proportionality in the resort to war determines a limit to the amount of harm it can be permissible to cause for the sake of achieving a just cause. It seems to follow that if a war has caused harm up to that limit but has not achieved the just cause, it should be terminated. I argue, however, that this is a mistake. Judgments of proportionality are entirely prospective and harms suffered or inflicted in the past should in general be ignored. (...)
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  6. added 2019-01-15
    States of Violence: War, Capital Punishment, and Letting Die.Austin Sarat & Jennifer L. Culbert (eds.) - 2009 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book brings together scholarship on three different forms of state violence, examining each for what it can tell us about the conditions under which states use violence and the significance of violence to our understanding of states. This book calls into question the legitimacy of state uses of violence and mounts a sustained effort at interpretation, sense making, and critique. It suggests that condemning the state's decisions to use lethal force is not a simple matter of abolishing the death (...)
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  7. added 2019-01-15
    Six Motives of Justified Disobedience.Boris Kashnikov - 2002 - Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 10 (2):197-206.
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  8. added 2019-01-15
    Economic Disarmament.J. H. Richardson - 1932 - International Journal of Ethics 42 (3):347-348.
  9. added 2018-10-24
    The Justice and Prudence of War: Toward A Libertarian Analysis.Roderick Long - 2006 - Reason Papers 28:51-60.
  10. added 2018-07-23
    Debating Humanitarian Intervention Should We Try to Save Strangers?Bas Van Der Vossen & Fernando R. Tesón - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
  11. added 2018-07-07
    Weighing Lives in War- Foreign Vs. Domestic.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2018 - In Larry May (ed.), Cambridge Handbook on the Just War. pp. 186-198.
    I argue that the lives of domestic and enemy civilians should not receive equal weight in our proportionality calculations. Rather, the lives of enemy civilians ought to be “partially discounted” relative to the lives of domestic civilians. We ought to partially discount the lives of enemy civilians for the following reason (or so I argue). When our military wages a just war, we as civilians vest our right to self-defense in our military. This permits our military to weigh our lives (...)
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  12. added 2018-07-03
    Culture Weaponized: A Contrarian Theory of the Sometime Appropriateness of the Destruction, Theft and Trade of Art and Cultural Artifacts in Armed Conflict.Duncan MacIntosh - manuscript
    This paper argues that culture itself can be a weapon against the disentitled within cultures, and against members of other cultures; and when cultures are unjust and hegemonic, the theft of and destruction of elements of their culture can be a justifiable weapon of self-defense by the oppressed. This means that in at least some conflicts, those that are really insurgencies against oppression, such theft and destruction should not be seen as war crimes, but as legitimate military maneuvers. The paper (...)
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  13. added 2018-05-18
    Virtue Ethics and Nonviolence.David K. Chan - 2018 - In Andrew Fiala (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Pacifism and Nonviolence. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 168-178.
    In this paper, I discuss virtue ethics in relation to the rejection of the use of lethal violence. I argue that, given how I apply virtue ethics, a person of good character will have a very strong intrinsic desire to avoid the killing of another human being, so that only in rare circumstances where the alternative to violence is immensely evil would the use of violence to prevent the evil be the morally appropriate choice for the person to make. I (...)
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  14. added 2018-03-16
    Dignity, Self-Respect, and Bloodless Invasions.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2017 - In Ryan Jenkins & Bradley Strawser (eds.), Who Should Die? The Ethics of Killing in War. Oxford University Press.
    In Chapter 7, “Dignity, Self-Respect, and Bloodless Invasions”, Saba Bazargan-Forward asks How much violence can we impose on those attempting to politically subjugate us? According to Bazargan-Forward, “reductive individualism” answers this question by determining how much violence one can impose on an individual wrongly attempting to prevent one from political participation. Some have argued that the amount of violence one can permissibly impose in such situations is decidedly sub-lethal. Accordingly, this counterintuitive response has cast doubt on the reductive individualist project. (...)
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  15. added 2018-03-05
    Not Just War: Eisikovits on A Theory of Truces.Thom Brooks - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):4-5.
    More work has gone into thinking about the philosophical justifications for starting a just war than bringing political violence to an end. The papers in this special section explore themes in Nir Eisikovits’s groundbreaking book A Theory of Truces and why truces deserve greater philosophical attention. This introduction briefly raises these issues and provides an overview of the papers.
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  16. added 2018-03-05
    Proporcjonalność w etyce wojny. O ograniczaniu całkowitej liczby ofiar konfliktów zbrojnych.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2014 - Ethos(misc.) 106 (2):279-298.
    Przemocy jest coraz mniej – zarówno w czasie pokoju, jak i podczas wojen. Na przykładzie trzech konfliktów zbrojnych z ostatnich lat zastanawiam się, czy decydenci powinni prowadzić działania zbrojne w taki sposób, by zminimalizować całkowitą liczbę ofiar. Pokazuję, że ani obowiązujące obecnie normy prawa międzynarodowego, ani osądy moralne na temat dopuszczalności stosowania przemocy nie wymagają od decydentów ograniczania całkowitej liczby ofiar konfliktów zbrojnych w każdym przypadku.
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  17. added 2018-03-05
    Polityka namierzania i zabijania: aspekty etyczne i prawne.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2014 - In Maciej Marszałek & Waldemar Kitler (eds.), Bezpieczeństwo narodowe i międzynarodowe wobec wyzwań współczesnego świata. Warszawa: Akademia Obrony Narodowej. pp. 509-522.
    Celem artykułu jest analiza prawnych i etycznych sposobów uzasadnienia dopuszczalności stosowania polityki namierzania i zabijania. Pojawiły się próby usprawiedliwienia tego typu działań poprzez odwołanie do egzekwowania prawa, reguł rządzących konfliktami zbrojnymi, sprawiedliwej odpłaty, prawa do obrony własnej. W artykule dokonuję analizy tych sposobów usprawiedliwiania polityki namierzania i zabijania, a następnie rozważam, które z nich faktycznie mogą uzasadniać tego typu politykę. Rozważania prowadzę w świetle głównej hipotezy projektu badawczego, który obecnie prowadzę, zakładającej, że normy regulujące dopuszczalność i sposoby toczenia konfliktów zbrojnych (...)
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  18. added 2018-03-05
    New Waves in Gobal Justice.Thom Brooks (ed.) - 2014 - Palgrave-MacMillan.
    With essays ranging from climate change and global poverty to just war and human rights and immigration, leading future figures present an ideal collection for anyone interested in the most important debates in global justice.
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  19. added 2018-03-05
    Etyka wojny a dopuszczalność zabijania.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2010 - Diametros 25:103-117.
    W artykule wykażę, że szeroko rozpowszechnione poglądy na temat norm, które obowiązują żółnierzy na wojnie, pozostają w sprzeczności z moralnością ogólną. Etyka wojny dopuszcza działania, które w zwyczajnych sytuacjach nie tylko są uznawane za moralnie niedopuszczalne, ale wydają się czynami godnymi najwyższego moralnego potępienia. Zwracam uwagę na dwie wybrane rozbieżności między etyką ogólną a etyką wojny, tj. na problem związany z istnieniem asymetrii pomiędzy atakującymi i atakowanymi oraz na kwestię tego, kto jest właściwym celem moralnie usprawiedliwionego aktu przemocy. Odrzucając stanowiska (...)
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  20. added 2018-03-05
    Justifying Terrorism.Thom Brooks - 2010 - Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (3):189-196.
    Virginia Held's recent How Terrorism Is Wrong offers us any number of important contributions to how we think about terrorist violence. My discussion will focus on only one of these contributions, namely, how terrorism may be justified. This justification rests upon a group being denied a voice. Thus, terrorism may become justified where this demand to be heard is denied, coupled with the corollary that all nonviolent options have been exhausted. I will argue that we should require a more narrow (...)
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  21. added 2018-03-05
    Etyka wojny. Antologia.Tomasz Żuradzki & Tomasz Kuniński (eds.) - 2009 - Warszawa: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN.
    Antologia tekstów poświęconych etycznym aspektom agresji i przemocy stosowanej przez państwo. Obejmuje teksty najwybitniejszych naukowców z dziedziny etyki praktycznej i filozofii politycznej.
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  22. added 2018-03-02
    Burkean Beauty in the Service of Violence.C. E. Emmer - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (3):55-64.
    Examining the images of war displayed on front pages of the New York Times, David Shields makes the case that they ultimately glamorize military conflict. He anchors his case with an excerpt on the delight of the sublime from Edmund Burke’s aesthetic theory in A Philosophical Enquiry. By contrast, this essay considers violence and warfare using not the Burkean sublime, but instead the beautiful in Burke’s aesthetics, and argues that forming identities on the beautiful in the Burkean sense can ultimately (...)
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  23. added 2018-02-18
    Partners: Discernment and Humanitarian Efforts in Settings of Violence.Nicole Gastineau Campos & Paul Farmer - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):506-515.
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  24. added 2018-02-17
    Should the Changing Character of War Affect Our Theories of War?Jovana Davidovic - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (3):603-618.
    War has changed so much that it barely resembles the paradigmatic cases of armed conflict that just war theories and international humanitarian law seemed to have had in mind even a few decades ago. The changing character of war includes not only the use of new technology such as drones, but probably more problematically the changing temporal and spatial scope of war and the changing character of actors in war. These changes give rise to worries about what counts as war (...)
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  25. added 2018-02-17
    What's in a War?Etienne Balibar - 2008 - Ratio Juris 21 (3):365-386.
    Abstract. This paper combines reflections on the current "state of war" in the Middle East with an epistemological discussion of the meaning and implications of the category "war" itself, in order to dissipate the confusions arising from the idea of a "War on Terror." The first part illustrates the insufficiency of the ideal type involved in dichotomies which are implicit in the naming and classifications of wars. They point nevertheless to a deeper problem which concerns the antinomic character of a (...)
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  26. added 2018-02-02
    Pacifism: A Philosophy of Nonviolence.Robert L. Holmes - 2017 - Bloomsbury.
  27. added 2017-12-13
    Terrorism, Jus Post Bellum and the Prospect of Peace.Anne Schwenkenbecher - 2017 - In Florian Demont-Biaggi (ed.), The Nature of Peace and the Morality of Armed Conflict. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 123-140.
    Just war scholars are increasingly focusing on the importance of jus post bellum – justice after war – for the legitimacy of military campaigns. Should something akin to jus post bellum standards apply to terrorist campaigns? Assuming that at least some terrorist actors pursue legitimate goals or just causes, do such actors have greater difficulty satisfying the prospect-of-success criterion of Just War Theory than military actors? Further, may the use of the terrorist method as such – state or non-state – (...)
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  28. added 2017-11-22
    Compensation and Proportionality in War.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2017 - In Claire Finkelstein, Larry Larry & Jens David Ohlin (eds.), Weighing Lives in War. Oxford University Press).
    Even in just wars we infringe the rights of countless civilians whose ruination enables us to protect our own rights. These civilians are owed compensation, even in cases where the collateral harms they suffer satisfy the proportionality constraint. I argue that those who authorize or commit the infringements and who also benefit from those harms will bear that compensatory duty, even if the unjust aggressor cannot or will not discharge that duty. I argue further that if we suspect antecedently that (...)
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  29. added 2017-11-22
    Standards of Risk in War and Civil Life.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2017 - In Florian Demont-Biaggi (ed.), The Nature of Peace and the Morality of Armed Conflict. Palgrave.
    Though the duties of care owed toward innocents in war and in civil life are at the bottom univocally determined by the same ethical principles, Bazargan-Forward argues that those very principles will yield in these two contexts different “in-practice” duties. Furthermore, the duty of care we owe toward our own innocents is less stringent than the duty of care we owe toward foreign innocents in war. This is because risks associated with civil life but not war (a) often increase the (...)
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  30. added 2017-11-22
    Varieties of Contingent Pacifism in War.Saba Bazargan-Forward - 2014 - In Helen Frowe & Gerald Lang (eds.), How We Fight. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-17.
    The destruction wrought by even just wars lends undeniable appeal to radical pacifism, according to which all wars are unjust. Yet radical pacifism is fundamentally flawed. In the past decade, a moderate and more defensible form of pacifism has emerged. According to what has been called ‘contingent pacifism’, it is very unlikely that it is morally permissible to wage any given war. This chapter develops the doctrine of contingent pacifism by distinguishing and developing various versions of it, and by assessing (...)
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  31. added 2017-11-22
    Proportionality, Territorial Occupation, and Enabled Terrorism.Saba Bazargan - 2013 - Law and Philosophy 32 (4):435-457.
    Some collateral harms affecting enemy civilians during a war are agentially mediated – for example, the US-led invasion of Iraq in 2003 sparked an insurgency which killed thousands of Iraqi civilians. I call these ‘collaterally enabled harms.’ Intuitively, we ought to discount the weight that these harms receive in the ‘costs’ column of our ad bellum proportionality calculation. But I argue that an occupying military force with de facto political authority has a special obligation to provide minimal protection to the (...)
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  32. added 2017-08-23
    The 2003 U.S. Invasion of Iraq: Militarism in the Service of Geopolitics.Edmund Byrne - 2005 - In Justice and Violence: Political Violence, Pacifism and Cultural Transformation. Aldershot UK and Burlington VT: Aldershot. pp. 193-216.
    Not the publicly asserted reasons (humanitarianism and self-defense) but cooptation of oil reserves was the objective behind the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. This underlying motive utterly fails to satisfy just war jus ad bellum conditions. This prioritization of petroleum is well documented and is consistent with decades old US policy towards the Middle East, especially as codified by Anthony Cordesman in 1998 and US DoD's Strategic Assessment 1999 and then adopted by Bush II. This fraudulent use of military (...)
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  33. added 2017-08-22
    The Philosophical Challenge of September 11, Edited by Tom Rockmore, Joseph Margolis, and Armen T. Marsoobian. [REVIEW]Edmund F. Byrne - 2006 - Teaching Philosophy 29 (3):269-271.
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  34. added 2017-07-29
    Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict: Ethical, Legal, and Strategic Implications, Edited by David Cortright, Rachel Fairhurst, and Kristen Wall. [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 2016 - Michigan War Studies Review 2016 (071):1-3.
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  35. added 2017-07-29
    Haunted Victory: The American Crusade to Destroy Saddam and Impose Democracy on Iraq, by William R. Nester. [REVIEW]Edmund Byrne - 2012 - Michigan War Studies Review 2012 (048):1-3.
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  36. added 2017-07-08
    Global Consequentialism and the Morality and Laws of War.Hilary Greaves - forthcoming - In McDermott and Roser Kuosmanen (ed.), Human rights and 21st century challenges. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Rights-based approaches and consequentialist approaches to ethics are often seen as being diametrically opposed to one another. In one sense, they are. In another sense, however, they can be reconciled: a ‘global’ form of consequentialism might supply consequentialist foundations for a derivative morality that is non-consequentialist, and perhaps rights-based, in content. By way of case study to illustrate how this might work, I survey what a global consequentialist should think about a recent dispute between Jeff McMahan and Henry Shue on (...)
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  37. added 2017-06-27
    The Ethics of War: Classical and Contemporary Readings.Gregory Reichberg, Henrik Syse & Endre Begby (eds.) - 2006 - Blackwell.
  38. added 2017-06-16
    Cosmopolitan Peace Cecile Fabre. [REVIEW]Michael Kocsis - forthcoming - Dialogue.
  39. added 2017-06-12
    Pro Mundo Mori? The Problem of Cosmopolitan Motivation in War.Lior Erez - 2017 - Ethics and International Affairs 31 (2):143-165.
    This article presents a new understanding of the problem of cosmopolitan motivation in war, comparing it to the motivational critique of social justice cosmopolitanism. The problem of cosmopolitanism's “motivational gap” is best interpreted as a political one, not a meta-ethical or ethical one. That is, the salient issue is not whether an individual soldier is able to be motivated by cosmopolitan concerns, nor is it whether being motivated by cosmopolitanism would be too demanding. Rather, given considerations of legitimacy in the (...)
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  40. added 2017-04-13
    Putting the War Back in Just War Theory: A Critique of Examples.Rigstad Mark - 2017 - Ethical Perspectives 24 (1):123-144.
    Analytic just war theorists often attempt to construct ideal theories of military justice on the basis of intuitions about imaginary and sometimes outlandish examples, often taken from non-military contexts. This article argues for a sharp curtailment of this method and defends, instead, an empirically and historically informed approach to the ethical scrutiny of armed conflicts. After critically reviewing general philosophical reasons for being sceptical of the moral-theoretic value of imaginary hypotheticals, the article turns to some of the special problems that (...)
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  41. added 2017-02-27
    Ethics and War in Comparative Religious Perspective.David L. Perry - unknown
    In this essay I intend to highlight a wide range of ethical views on killing and war in the world's major religious traditions. I've found that one can learn a lot about a tradition by paying attention to how it answers the question, Is it ever right to kill? What we find when we survey world religions are teachings that are at least paradoxical, and in some cases downright contradictory. Every major religious tradition regards life and especially human life as (...)
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  42. added 2017-02-27
    Introduction: Ethics Through the Cold War and After.Joel H. Rosenthal - forthcoming - Ethics and International Affairs: A Reader.
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  43. added 2017-02-27
    The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and War.Frowe Helen & Seth Lazar - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
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  44. added 2017-02-27
    War as Paradox: Clausewitz and Hegel on Fighting Doctrines and Ethics.Youri Cormier - 2016 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Two centuries after Carl von Clausewitz wrote On War, it lines the shelves of military colleges around the world and even showed up in an Al Qaeda hideout. Though it has shaped much of the common parlance on the subject, On War is perceived by many as a “metaphysical fog,” widely known but hardly read. In War as Paradox, Youri Cormier lifts the fog on this iconic work by explaining its philosophical underpinnings. Building up a genealogy of dialectical war theory (...)
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  45. added 2017-02-27
    Utilitarianism and the Ethics of War.William H. Shaw - 2016 - Routledge.
    This book offers a detailed utilitarian analysis of the ethical issues involved in war. Utilitarianism and the Ethics of War addresses the two basic ethical questions posed by war: when, if ever, are we morally justified in waging war, and if recourse to arms is warranted, how are we permitted to fight the wars we wage? In addition, it deals with the challenge that realism and relativism raise for the ethical discussion of war, and with the duties of military personnel (...)
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  46. added 2017-02-27
    Commonsense Morality and the Ethics of Killing in War: An Experimental Survey of the Israeli Population.Yitzhak Benbaji, Amir Falk & Yuval Feldman - 2015 - The Law and Ethics of Human Rights 9 (2):195-227.
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  47. added 2017-02-27
    Response to Michael Gross: Military Ethics, Insurgency, and the Rise of ‘Soft War’.George R. Lucas Jr - 2015 - Journal of Military Ethics 14 (3-4):251-254.
  48. added 2017-02-27
    Risky Killing and the Ethics of War.Seth Lazar - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):91-117.
    Killing civilians is worse than killing soldiers. Although this principle is widely affirmed, recent military practice and contemporary just war theory have undermined it. This article argues that killing an innocent person is worse the likelier it was, when you acted, that he would be innocent: riskier killings are worse than less risky killings. In war, killing innocent civilians is almost always riskier than killing innocent soldiers. So killing innocent civilians is worse than killing innocent soldiers. Since almost all civilians (...)
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  49. added 2017-02-27
    Bertrand Russell and Ralph Barton Perry on War and Nonviolence: On Russell’s “The Ethics of War”.Alan Ryan - 2014 - Ethics 125 (1):204-207,.
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  50. added 2017-02-27
    The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction, by Helen FroweAggression and Crimes Against Peace, by Larry May.Paul Gilbert - 2014 - Mind 123 (490):598-601.
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