About this topic
Summary Ethical issues associated with AI are proliferating and rising to popular attention as intelligent machines become ubiquitous. For example, AIs can and do model aspects essential to moral agency and so offer tools for the investigation of consciousness and other aspects of cognition contributing to moral status (either ascribed or achieved). This has deep implications for our understanding of moral agency, and so of systems of ethics meant to account for and to provide for the development of such capacities. This raises the issue of responsible and/or blameworthy AIs operating openly in general society, with deep implications again for systems of ethics which must accommodate moral AIs. Consider also that human social infrastructure (e.g. energy grids, mass-transit systems) are increasingly moderated by increasingly intelligent machines. This alone raises many moral/ethical concerns. For example, who or what is responsible in the case of an accident due to system error, or due to design flaws, or due to proper operation outside of anticipated constraints? Finally, as AIs become increasingly intelligent, there seems some legitimate concern over the potential for AIs to manage human systems according to AI values, rather than as directly programmed by human designers. These issues often bare on the long-term safety of intelligent systems, and not only for individual human beings, but for the human race and life on Earth as a whole. These issues and many others are central to Ethics of AI. 
Key works Bostrom manuscriptMüller 2014
Introductions Müller 2013White 2015Gunkel 2012
  Show all references
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:
611 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 611
Material to categorize
  1. Theodore Bach (2011). Structure-Mapping: Directions From Simulation to Theory. Philosophical Psychology 24 (1):23-51.
    The theory of mind debate has reached a “hybrid consensus” concerning the status of theory-theory and simulation-theory. Extant hybrid models either specify co-dependency and implementation relations, or distribute mentalizing tasks according to folk-psychological categories. By relying on a non-developmental framework these models fail to capture the central connection between simulation and theory. I propose a “dynamic” hybrid that is informed by recent work on the nature of similarity cognition. I claim that Gentner’s model of structure-mapping allows us to understand simulation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2. Luca Barlassina (2013). Simulation is Not Enough: A Hybrid Model of Disgust Attribution on the Basis of Visual Stimuli. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):401-419.
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the Theory-Theory (TT), mindreading is based on one's possession of a Theory of Mind. On the other hand, the Simulation Theory (ST) maintains that one arrives at the attribution of a mental state by simulating it in one's own mind. In this paper, I propose a ST-TT hybrid model of the ability to attribute disgust on the basis of visual stimuli such as facial expressions, body postures, etc. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. J. Barry (2010). The Risk of Total Divergence: Politicized Intelligence and Defactualization in the Age of Imminent War. Télos 2010 (150):27-43.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Archana Barua & Ananya Barua (2012). Gendering the Digital Body: Women and Computers. [REVIEW] AI and Society 27 (4):465-477.
    As we live in a culture where “everything can be commodified, measured and calculated and can be put in the competitive market for sale, detached from its roots and purpose,” there is need to redefine our humanness in terms of the changing nature of science, technology, and their deeper impact on human life. More than anything else, it is Information Technology that now has tremendous influence on all spheres of our life, and in a sense, IT has become the destiny (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Ingrid Björk & Iordanis Kavathatzopoulos (2016). Robots, Ethics and Language. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):270-273.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Michael T. Black (1993). Consensus and Authenticity in Representation: Simulation as Participative Theatre. [REVIEW] AI and Society 7 (1):40-51.
    Representation was invented as an issue during the 17th century in response to specific developments in the technology of simulation. It remains an issue of central importance today in the design of information systems and approaches to artificial intelligence. Our cultural legacy of thought about representation is enormous but as inhibiting as it is productive. The challenge to designers of representative technology is to reshape this legacy by enlarging the politics rather than the technics of simulation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Nick Bostrom (2005). Transhumanist Values. Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (Supplement):3-14.
    Transhumanism is a loosely defined movement that has developed gradually over the past two decades. [1] It promotes an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and evaluating the opportunities for enhancing the human condition and the human organism opened up by the advancement of technology. Attention is given to both present technologies, like genetic engineering and information technology, and anticipated future ones, such as molecular nanotechnology and artificial intelligence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8. Xindi Cai & I. I. Wunsch (2007). Computer Go: A Grand Challenge to AI. In Wlodzislaw Duch & Jacek Mandziuk (eds.), Challenges for Computational Intelligence. Springer. pp. 443--465.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Mar Cello Guarim (2011). Computational Neural Modeling and the Philosophy of Ethics Reflections on the Particularism-Generalism Debate. In M. Anderson S. Anderson (ed.), Machine Ethics. Cambridge Univ. Press.
  10. Christopher A. Chung & Michael Alfred (2009). Design, Development, and Evaluation of an Interactive Simulator for Engineering Ethics Education (Seee). Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (2):189-199.
    Societal pressures, accreditation organizations, and licensing agencies are emphasizing the importance of ethics in the engineering curriculum. Traditionally, this subject has been taught using dogma, heuristics, and case study approaches. Most recently a number of organizations have sought to increase the utility of these approaches by utilizing the Internet. Resources from these organizations include on-line courses and tests, videos, and DVDs. While these individual approaches provide a foundation on which to base engineering ethics, they may be limited in developing a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  11. Luc Ciompi & Martin Baatz (2008). The Energetic Dimension of Emotions: An Evolution-Based Computer Simulation with General Implications. Biological Theory 3 (1):42-50.
    Viewed from an evolutionary standpoint, emotions can be understood as situation-specific patterns of energy consumption related to behaviors that have been selected by evolution for their survival value, such as environmental exploration, flight or fight, and socialization. In the present article, the energy linked with emotions is investigated by a strictly energy-based simulation of the evolution of simple autonomous agents provided with random cognitive and motor capacities and operating among food and predators. Emotions are translated into evolving patterns of energy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Andy Clark (1996). Linguistic Anchors in the Sea of Thought? Pragmatics and Cognition 4 (1):93-103.
    Andy Clark is currently Professor of Philosophy and Director of the Philosophy/Neuroscience/Psychology program at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He is the author of two books MICROCOGNITION (MIT Press/Bradford Books 1989) and ASSOCIATIVE ENGINES (MIT Press/Bradford Books, 1993) as well as numerous papers and four edited volumes. He is an ex- committee member of the British Society for the Philosophy of Science and of the Society for Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behavior. Awards include a visiting Fellowship at (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13. Kenneth M. Colby, Peter M. Colby & Robert J. Stoller (1990). Dialogues in Natural Language with Guru, a Psychologic Inference Engine. Philosophical Psychology 3 (2 & 3):171 – 186.
    The aim of this project was to explore the possibility of constructing a psychologic inference engine that might enhance introspective self-awareness by delivering inferences about a user based on what he said in interactive dialogues about his closest opposite-sex relation. To implement this aim, we developed a computer program (guru) with the capacity to simulate human conversation in colloquial natural language. The psychologic inferences offered represent the authors' simulations of their commonsense psychology responses to expected user-input expressions. The heuristics of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Emad Abdel Rahim Dahiyat (2010). Intelligent Agents and Liability: Is It a Doctrinal Problem or Merely a Problem of Explanation? [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (1):103-121.
    The question of liability in the case of using intelligent agents is far from simple, and cannot sufficiently be answered by deeming the human user as being automatically responsible for all actions and mistakes of his agent. Therefore, this paper is specifically concerned with the significant difficulties which might arise in this regard especially if the technology behind software agents evolves, or is commonly used on a larger scale. Furthermore, this paper contemplates whether or not it is possible to share (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. J. Decety (2002). Neurophysiological Evidence for Simulation and Action. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.
  16. Aaron Dewitt (2012). Group Agency and Epistemic Dependency. Episteme 9 (3):235-244.
    Modern epistemic questions have largely been focused around the individual and her ability to acquire knowledge autonomously. More recently epistemologists have begun to look more broadly in providing accounts of knowledge by considering its social context, where the individual depends on others for true beliefs. Hardwig explains the effect of this shift starkly, arguing that to reject epistemic dependency is to deny certain true beliefs widely held throughout society and, more specifically, it is to deny that science and scholarship can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. Jérôme Dokic (2002). Reply to 'the Scope and Limit of Mental Simulation'. In Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.), Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.
  18. Jérôme Dokic & Joëlle Proust (eds.) (2002). Simulation and Knowledge of Action. John Benjamins.
    CHAPTER Simulation theory and mental concepts Alvin I. Goldman Rutgers University. Folk psychology and the TT-ST debate The study of folk psychology, ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  19. Hubert Dreyfus, Heidegger and Foucault on the Subject, Agencycourses.
    of autonomous agency. Yet neither denies the importance of human freedom. In Heidegger's early work the subject is reinterpreted as Dasein -- a non autonomous, culturally bound (or thrown) way of being, that can yet change the field of possibilities in which it acts. In middle Heidegger, thinkers alone have the power to disclose a new world, while in later Heidegger, anyone is free to step back from the current world, to enter one of a plurality of worlds, and, thereby, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Cornelius Ernst (1958). Ethics and the Play of Intelligence. New Blackfriars 39 (460-461):324-326.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Fady Farah & François Rousselot (2007). DARES: Documents Annotation and Recombining System—Application to the European Law. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 15 (2):83-102.
    Accessing legislation via the Internet is more and more frequent. As a result, systems that allow consultation of law texts are becoming more and more powerful. This paper presents DARES, a generic system which can be adapted to any domain to handle documents production needs. It is based on an annotation engine which allows obtaining XML documents inputs as required by the system, and on an XML fragments recombining system. The latter operates using a fragment manipulation functions toolbox to generate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. David Feil-Seifer, Kristine Skinner & Maja J. Matarić (2007). Benchmarks for Evaluating Socially Assistive Robotics. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 8 (3):423-439.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Andreas Fischer, Assessment of Problem Solving Skills by Means of Multiple Complex Systems – Validity of Finite Automata and Linear Dynamic Systems.
    The assessment of highly domain-general problem solving skills is increasingly important as problem solving is increasingly demanded by modern workplaces and increasingly present in international large-scale assessments such as the Programme for International Student Assessment. This thesis is about the computer-based assessment of problem solving skills based on Multiple Complex Systems : The main idea of the MCS approach is to present multiple computer-simulations of “minimally complex” problems in order to reliably assess certain problem solving skills. In each simulation, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Justin C. Fisher (2006). Does Simulation Theory Really Involve Simulation? Philosophical Psychology 19 (4):417 – 432.
    This paper contributes to an ongoing debate regarding the cognitive processes involved when one person predicts a target person's behavior and/or attributes a mental state to that target person. According to simulation theory, a person typically performs these tasks by employing some part of her brain as a simulation of what is going on in a corresponding part of the brain of the target person. I propose a general intuitive analysis of what 'simulation' means. Simulation is a particular way of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25. Mariusz Flasiński (1997). "Every Man in His Notions" or Alchemists' Discussion on Artificial Intelligence. Foundations of Science 2 (1):107-121.
    A survey of the main approaches in a mind study -oriented part of Artificial Intelligence is made focusing on controversial issues and extreme hypotheses. Various meanings of terms: "intelligence" and "artificial intelligence" are discussed. Limitations for constructing intelligent systems resulting from the lack of formalized models of cognitive activity are shown. The approaches surveyed are then recapitulated in the light of these limitations.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Luciano Floridi (2004). Open Problems in the Philosophy of Information. Metaphilosophy 35 (4):554-582.
    The philosophy of information (PI) is a new area of research with its own field of investigation and methodology. This article, based on the Herbert A. Simon Lecture of Computing and Philosophy I gave at Carnegie Mellon University in 2001, analyses the eighteen principal open problems in PI. Section 1 introduces the analysis by outlining Herbert Simon's approach to PI. Section 2 discusses some methodological considerations about what counts as a good philosophical problem. The discussion centers on Hilbert's famous analysis (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  27. Tom Froese (2007). On the Role of AI in the Ongoing Paradigm Shift Within the Cognitive Sciences. In M. Lungarella (ed.), 50 Years of AI. Springer Verlag.
    This paper supports the view that the ongoing shift from orthodox to embodied-embedded cognitive science has been significantly influenced by the experimental results generated by AI research. Recently, there has also been a noticeable shift toward enactivism, a paradigm which radicalizes the embodied-embedded approach by placing autonomous agency and lived subjectivity at the heart of cognitive science. Some first steps toward a clarification of the relationship of AI to this further shift are outlined. It is concluded that the success of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Yasushi Fukuhara (2016). A Critical Interpretation of Bottom-Up Management and Leadership Styles Within Japanese Companies: A Focus on Empowerment and Trust. AI and Society 31 (1):85-93.
  29. Liane Gabora (2002). Amplifying Phenomenal Information: Toward a Fundamental Theory of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (8):3-29.
    from non-conscious components by positing that consciousness is a universal primitive. For example, the double aspect theory of information holds that infor- mation has a phenomenal aspect. How then do you get from phenomenal infor- mation to human consciousness? This paper proposes that an entity is conscious to the extent it amplifies information, first by trapping and integrating it through closure, and second by maintaining dynamics at the edge of chaos through simul- taneous processes of divergence and convergence. The origin (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Jai Galliott & Warren Reed (eds.) (2016). Ethics and the Future of Spying: Technology, National Security and Intelligence Collection. Routledge.
    This volume examines the ethical issues generated by recent developments in intelligence collection and offers a comprehensive analysis of the key legal, moral and social questions thereby raised. Intelligence officers, whether gatherers, analysts or some combination thereof, are operating in a sea of social, political, scientific and technological change. This book examines the new challenges faced by the intelligence community as a result of these changes. It looks not only at how governments employ spies as a tool of state and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Jan Goldman (ed.) (2005). Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional. Scarecrow Press.
    This is the first book to offer the best essays, articles, and speeches on ethics and intelligence that demonstrate the complex moral dilemmas in intelligence collection, analysis, and operations. Some are recently declassified and never before published, and all are written by authors whose backgrounds are as varied as their insights, including Robert M. Gates, former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency; John P. Langan, the Joseph Cardinal Bernardin Professor of Catholic Social Thought at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Daniel H. Grollman (2014). Robots: Pets or People? Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 15 (2):205-209.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Ismo Kantola (2013). On the Re-Materialization of the Virtual. AI and Society 28 (2):189-198.
    The so-called new economy based on the global network of digitalized communication was welcomed as a platform of innovations and as a vehicle of advancement of democracy. The concept of virtuality captures the essence of the new economy: efficiency and free access. In practice, the new economy has developed into an heterogenic entity dominated by practices such as propagation of trust and commitment to standards and standard-like technological solutions; entrenchment of locally strategic subsystems; surveillance of unwanted behavior. Five empirical cases (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Wilhelm E. J. Klein (2016). Robots Make Ethics Honest. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 45 (3):261-269.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Irina P. Kuzheleva-Sagan & Natalya A. Suchkova (forthcoming). Designing Trust in the Internet Services. AI and Society.
  36. Robert E. Macneel (1995). Technology Report: Intelligent Summoner. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 3 (4):277-285.
    Trial Courts all over the world have a common problem concerning how to regulate the number of jurors to summon so that there is a sufficient but not excess supply available for scheduled trials. Many trials end abruptly just before jurors are selected for voir dire. The reasons for this are diverse, including last minute settlements, guilty pleas, continuances, unavailability of witnesses, etc. This typically results in one-third to one-half of all summoned jurors never experiencing any activity at all — (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Magoulas & Pouloudi (2000). Neural Expert Systems in Medical Image Interpretation: Development, Use, and Ethical Issues. Journal of Intelligent Systems 10 (5-6):451-472.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Gail F. Melson (2014). Building Better Robots: Lessons From Observing Relationships Between Living Beings. Interaction Studiesinteraction Studies Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 15 (2):173-179.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Greg Michaelson & Ruth Aylett (2011). Special Issue on Social Impact of AI: Killer Robots or Friendly Fridges. [REVIEW] AI and Society 26 (4):317-318.
  40. Ryan Muldoon (2007). Robust Simulations. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):873-883.
    As scientists begin to study increasingly complex questions, many have turned to computer simulation to assist in their inquiry. This methodology has been challenged by both analytic modelers and experimentalists. A primary objection of analytic modelers is that simulations are simply too complicated to perform model verification. From the experimentalist perspective it is that there is no means to demonstrate the reality of simulation. The aim of this paper is to consider objections from both of these perspectives, and to argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  41. C. Müller Vincent (ed.) (2016). FUNDAMENTAL ISSUES OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE, Synthese Library 377. Springer International Publishing Switzerland.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Vincent C. Müller (ed.) (2015). Risks of General Intelligence. CRC Press - Chapman & Hall.
  43. Marina A. L. Oshana (2002). The Misguided Marriage of Responsibility and Autonomy. Journal of Ethics 6 (3):261-280.
    Much of the literature devoted to the topics of agent autonomy and agent responsibility suggests strong conceptual overlaps between the two, although few explore these overlaps explicitly. Beliefs of this sort are commonplace, but they mistakenly conflate the global state of being autonomous with the local condition of acting autonomously or exhibiting autonomy in respect to some act or decision. Because the latter, local phenomenon of autonomy seems closely tied to the condition of being responsible for an act, we tend (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  44. Ugo Pagallo (forthcoming). When Morals Ain’T Enough: Robots, Ethics, and the Rules of the Law. Minds and Machines:1-14.
    No single moral theory can instruct us as to whether and to what extent we are confronted with legal loopholes, e.g. whether or not new legal rules should be added to the system in the criminal law field. This question on the primary rules of the law appears crucial for today’s debate on roboethics and still, goes beyond the expertise of robo-ethicists. On the other hand, attention should be drawn to the secondary rules of the law: The unpredictability of robotic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Abdul Paliwala (2001). An Intellectual Celebration: A Review of the Jurix Legal Knowledge Based Systems Scholarship. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 8 (4):317-335.
    The Foundation for Legal Knowledge Systems (JURIX) has, sinceits foundation in 1988, become an internationally renowned forumfor Law and Artificial Intelligence in theNetherlands. This paper is based onan intellectual review of the work of JURIX requested by theorganisation as part of its 10th anniversary in December 1997 andpresented as a keynote address at the 10th anniversary conference.It has been updated to include the following two conferences. Itapplauds the overall effort but also suggests some directions forfuture development and suggests in particular:The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Henry Prakken (2008). A Formal Model of Adjudication Dialogues. Artificial Intelligence and Law 16 (3):305-328.
    This article presents a formal dialogue game for adjudication dialogues. Existing AI & law models of legal dialogues and argumentation-theoretic models of persuasion are extended with a neutral third party, to give a more realistic account of the adjudicator’s role in legal procedures. The main feature of the model is a division into an argumentation phase, where the adversaries plea their case and the adjudicator has a largely mediating role, and a decision phase, where the adjudicator decides the dispute on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  47. Capurro Raphael (ed.) (2009). Ethics and Robotics. IOS Press.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. William Rehg, Peter McBurney & Simon Parsons (2004). Computer Decision-Support Systems for Public Argumentation: Assessing Deliberative Legitimacy. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (3):203-228.
    Recent proposals for computer-assisted argumentation have drawn on dialectical models of argumentation. When used to assist public policy planning, such systems also raise questions of political legitimacy. Drawing on deliberative democratic theory, we elaborate normative criteria for deliberative legitimacy and illustrate their use for assessing two argumentation systems. Full assessment of such systems requires experiments in which system designers draw on expertise from the social sciences and enter into the policy deliberation itself at the level of participants.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49. Richard S. Rosenberg (2007). The Social Impact of Intelligent Artefacts. AI and Society 22 (3):367-383.
    The simplistic assumption that replacing humans by intelligent artifacts or introducing such artifacts, or robots, into all aspects of human society will necessarily benefit society at large must be continually re-evaluated. Clearly, contributing factors will involve concerns of efficiency, the role of work as a component in human self-worth, the distribution of wealth generated by advanced technologies, the potential for growing divisions in society resulting from gross inequities in income and from the loss of work as a central fact of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50. Rosenbrock Howard (2004). Ethics, Science, and the Mechanisation of the World Picture. AI and Society 18 (1):7-20.
    A nascent science in the sixteenth century rejected explanations in terms of purpose in favour of causality, and this bias has persisted and grown stronger. It has unfortunate consequences in areas where social and ethical considerations should prevail, and the paper describes a search extending over 20 years for a way in which these consequences could be avoided.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 611