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  1. Review of “Rethinking Evil: Contemporary Perspectives”. [REVIEW]Julia J. Aaron - 2003 - Essays in Philosophy 4 (2):18.
    María Pía Lara notes, in “Narrating Evil: A Postmetaphysical Theory,” that “There are thousands of books on evil, yet not one of them presents a satisfying theory of it.” Her statement from the last essay of this book sums up this anthology as well. Perhaps it is the nature of the topic or the current state of discussion in this field of study. In any case, Rethinking Evil must ultimately be added to those thousands of others books. This certainly does (...)
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  2. God and Evil.Kola Abimbola - 1993 - Philosophy Now 8:23-25.
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  3. God and Evil.K. Abíðbölá - 1994 - Philosophy Now 8:23-25.
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  4. Evil and the God-Who-Does-Nothing-In-Particular'.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1996 - In D. Z. Phillips (ed.), Religion and Morality. St. Martin's Press.
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  5. The Problem of Hell: A Problem of Evil for Christians.Marilyn McCord Adams - 1993 - In Eleonore Stump & Norman Kretzmann (eds.), Reasoned Faith: Essays in Philosophical Theology in Honor of Norman Kretzmann. Cornell University Press.
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  6. Evil and Theism: An Analytic Approach.Ira N. Adler - 1975 - Dissertation, New York University
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  7. The Metaphysics of Good and Evil According to Suarez.Jan A. Aertsen - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (2):420-421.
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  8. The Nature of Evil.M. B. Ahern - 1966 - Sophia 5 (3):35-44.
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  9. A Note on the Nature of Evil.M. B. Ahern - 1965 - Sophia 4 (2):17-25.
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  10. Evil and Enmity.B. Allen - 2004 - Common Knowledge 10 (2):185-197.
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  11. St. Augustine’s Free Will Theodicy and Natural Evil.Robert Allen - 2003 - Ars Disputandi 3.
    The problem of evil is an obstacle to justified belief in an omnipotent, omniscient, and omnibenevolent God . According to Saint Augustine’s free will theodicy , moral evil attends free will. Might something like AFWT also be used to account for natural evil? After all, it is possible that calamities such as famines, earthquakes, and floods are the effects of the sinful willing of certain persons, viz., ‘fallen angels.’ Working to destroy our faith, Satan and his cohorts could be responsible (...)
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  12. W. Lowe, "Evil and the Unconscious".T. Allik - 1987 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 22 (1/2):95.
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  13. The History of Evil in Antiquity: 2000 Bce to 450 Ce.Tom Angier, Chad Meister & Charles Taliaferro - 2016 - Routledge.
    This first volume of "The History of Evil" covers Graeco-Roman, Indian, Near Eastern and Eastern philosophy and religion from 2000 BCE to 450 CE. The volume charts the foundations of the history of evil among the major philosophical traditions and world religions, beginning with the oldest recorded traditions: the Vedas and Upanishads, Confucianism and Daoism, and Buddhism. This cutting-edge treatment of the history of evil at its crucial and determinative inception will appeal to those with particular interests in the ancient (...)
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  14. Evil is Privation.Bill Anglin & Stewart Goetz - 1982 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (1):3 - 12.
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  15. Kant on Human Nature and Radical Evil.Camille Atkinson - 2007 - Philosophy and Theology 19 (1/2):215-224.
    Are human beings essentially good or evil? Immanuel Kant responds, “[H]e [man] is as much the one as the other, partly good, partly bad.” Given this, I’d like to explore the following: What does Kant mean by human nature and how is it possible to be both good and evil? What is “original sin” and does it place limits on free will? In what respect might Kant ’s views be significant for non-believers? More specifically, is Kant saying that human beings (...)
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  16. Atheism, Radical Evil, and Kant.Auweele Dennis Vanden - 2010 - Philosophy and Theology 22 (1/2):155-176.
    This paper investigates the link between (radical) evil and the existence of God. Arguing with contemporary atheist thinkers, such as Richard Dawkins and Victor Stenger, I hold that one can take the existence of evil as a sign of the existence of God rather than its opposite. The work of Immanuel Kant, especially his thought on evil, is a fertile source to enliven this intuition. Kant implicitly seems to argue that because man is unable to overcome evil by himself, there (...)
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  17. The Lutheran Influence on Kant's Depraved Will.Dennis Vanden Auweele - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):117-134.
    Contemporary Kant-scholarship has a tendency to allign Kant’s understanding of depravity closer to Erasmus than Luther in their famous debate on the freedom of the will (1520–1527). While, at face value, some paragraphs do warrant such a claim, I will argue that Kant’s understanding of the radical evil will draws closer to Luther than Erasmus in a number of elements. These elements are (1) the intervention of the Wille for progress towards the good, (2) a positive choice for evil, (3) (...)
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  18. Openness to God: A Comparative Study of African and Western Philosophy Concerning the Problem of Evil.Peter Abengre Ayorogo - 1999 - Dissertation, Boston College
    The crux of the problem of evil in the West consists in positing an inconsistency between the existence of the God of theism and evil. This understanding of the problem is exemplified in the works of Hume, Mill, Hartshorne, and Marx. For them, the presence of evil, understood as an obstacle, necessarily limits either the divine attribute of omnipotence or benevolent or both. ;In contrast to this understanding is that of the Gurunse's of Ghana. They contend that the co-existence of (...)
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  19. The Secret Future of Evil Past.M. Babik - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (6):802-807.
  20. The Evil in Zechariah.Margaret Barker - 1978 - Heythrop Journal 19 (1):12–27.
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  21. Book Review: The Genealogy of Violence: Reflections on Creation, Freedom, and Evil. [REVIEW]Lee C. Barrett - 2002 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 56 (2):222-222.
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  22. The Soul's Conquest of Evil.W. W. Bartley - 1968 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 2:86-99.
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  23. Determinism and Evil: Some Clarifications.David Basinger - 1982 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 60 (2):163 – 166.
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  24. Evil as Evidence Against the Existence of God.David Basinger - 1978 - Philosophy Research Archives 4:55-67.
    Robert Pargetter has recently argued that, even if the theist cannot produce plausible explanations for the evil we experience, the atheologian has no justifiable basis for claiming that evil can in any sense count as strong evidence against God's existence. His strategy is to challenge as question-begging the atheologian's assumption that a prima facie conflict between God and evil exists and the atheologian's claim that God's nonexistence is a more plausible explanation for unresolved evil than a number of theistic options. (...)
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  25. Si Deus, Unde Malum?: A Critical Evaluation of Augustine's Theodicy.Vincent Battaglia - 2006 - The Australasian Catholic Record 83 (1):38.
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  26. Understanding Evil.Kenneth Baynes - 2004 - Constellations 11 (3):434-444.
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  27. A Problem for Theodicists.Theodore Benditt - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (194):470 - 474.
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  28. Wer Verantwortet Das Böse in der Welt?: Naturphilosophie, Theologie Und Medizin Im Gespräch.Klaus Berger, Harald Herholz & Ulrich Niemann (eds.) - 2008 - Pustet.
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  29. Dwellings of Evil.Knut Berner - 2012 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):127-141.
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  30. Evil and the Temptation of Theodicy.Richard J. Bernstein - 2002 - In Simon Critchley & Robert Bernasconi (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Levinas. Cambridge University Press. pp. 252--267.
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  31. The Enlightenment That Won't Go Away: Modernity's Crux.Robert W. Bertram - 2000 - Zygon 35 (4):919-925.
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  32. Anti‐Theodicy.Toby Betenson - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (1):56-65.
    In this article, I outline the major themes of ‘anti-theodicy’. Anti-theodicy is characterised as a reaction, as rejection, against traditional solutions to the problem of evil and against the traditional formulations of the problem of evil to which those solutions respond. I detail numerous ‘moral’ anti-theodical objections to theodicy, illustrating the central claim of anti-theodicy: Theodicy is morally objectionable. I also detail some ‘non-moral’ anti-theodical objections, illustrating the second major claim of anti-theodicy: Traditional formulations of the problem of evil are (...)
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  33. The Problem of Evil as a Moral Objection to Theism.Toby George Betenson - unknown
    I argue that the problem of evil can be a moral objection to theistic belief. The thesis has three broad sections, each establishing an element in this argument. Section one establishes the logically binding nature of the problem of evil: The problem of evil must be solved, if you are to believe in God. And yet, I borrow from J. L. Mackie’s criticisms of the moral argument for the existence of God, and argue that the fundamentally evaluative nature of the (...)
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  34. Axis of Evil or Access to Diesel?Andreas Bieler & Adam David Morton - 2015 - Historical Materialism 23 (2):94-130.
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  35. Territories of Evil.Nancy Billias - 2008 - Rodopi.
    Evil is not only an abstract concept to be analyzed intellectually, but a concrete reality that we all experience and wrestle with on an ongoing basis. To truly understand evil we must always approach it from both angles: the intellective and the phenomenological. This same assertion resounds through each of the papers in this volume, in which an interdisciplinary and international group presented papers on cannibalism, the Holocaust, terrorism, physical and emotional abuse, virtual and actual violence, and depravity in a (...)
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  36. God and Evil: A Unified Theodicy/Theology.David Birnbaum - forthcoming - Philosophy.
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  37. Optimism the Lesson of Ages.Benjamin Paul Blood - 1860 - Bela Marsh.
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  38. The Problem of Evil in Early Christianity.Louis Bouyer - 1949 - New Blackfriars 30 (346):6-15.
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  39. Kant's Theodicy Essay-Conditions for Success of Philosophical Theodicy.J. Brachtendorf - 2002 - Kant-Studien 93 (1):57-83.
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  40. Arguments for God's Existence.David Braine - 1998 - In Brian Davies (ed.), Philosophy of Religion: A Guide to the Subject. Georgetown University Press. pp. 42.
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  41. Evil and the Christian Faith.Herman Brautigam & Nels F. S. Ferre - 1948 - Philosophical Review 57 (6):623.
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  42. Minding Evil: Explorations of Human Iniquity.Margaret Sönser Breen - 2005 - Rodopi.
    Minding Evil: Explorations of Human Iniquity brings together fifteen essays, versions of which were presented at the Fifth International Conference on Evil and Wickedness, held in Prague in 2004. The volume examines evil and wickedness from a variety of disciplines, including criminology, cultural studies, gender studies, law, literature, peace studies, philosophy, psychology, and sociology. In so doing Minding Evil keeps in play the doubled meaning of its title: on the one hand, to tend to evil, that is, to oversee, cultivate, (...)
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  43. Truth, Reconciliation, and Evil.Margaret Sonser Breen - 2004 - Rodopi.
    Truth, Reconciliation, and Evil analyses evil in a variety of forms—as an unspeakable crime, a discursive or narrative force, a political byproduct, and an inevitable feature of warfare. The collection considers the forms of loss that the workings of evil exact, from the large-scale horror of genocide to the individual grief of a self-destructive homelessness. Finally, taken together, the fourteen essays that comprise this volume affirm that the undoing of evil—the moving beyond it through forgiveness and reconciliation—needs to occur within (...)
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  44. Understanding Evil: An Interdisciplinary Approach.Margaret Sönser Breen - 2003 - Rodopi.
    Written across the disciplines of law, literature, philosophy, and theology, Understanding Evil: An Interdisciplinary Approach represents wide-ranging approaches to and understandings of “evil” and “wickedness.”Consisting of three sections – “Grappling with Evil,” “Justice, Responsibility, and War” and “Blame, Murder, and Retributivism,” - all the essays are inter-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary in focus. Common themes emerge around the dominant narrative movements of grieving, loss, powerlessness, and retribution that have shaped so many political and cultural issues around the world since the fall of (...)
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  45. Social Evil.Teresa Brennan - 1997 - Social Research 64.
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  46. Good and Evil Actions.O. P. Brophy & Justin Marie - 2011 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (3):499-500.
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  47. The Poetics of Evil: Towards an Aesthetic Theodicy, by Philip Tallon.David Brown - 2013 - Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):228-231.
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  48. Reason and Religion.Stuart C. Brown & Royal Institute of Philosophy - 1977
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  49. Creating Creators: A Christian Theodicy.John Wright Buckman - 1943 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2):190.
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  50. Five Steps in the Evolution of Man's Knowledge of Good and Evil.Ralph Wendell Burhoe - 1967 - Zygon 2 (1):77-96.
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