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  1. Images of natural evil.Ronald L. Hall - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):213-216.
  2. Who’s Right About Rights?William Hasker - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):209-212.
    My comment on Jim Sterba’s bookFootnote1 will consist in a critique of what I take to be the central argument of the book, an argument that a certain kind of evil that is prevalent in our world is logically inconsistent with the existence of a good God. For our purposes here, the argument can be summarized briefly; if my objection as given here succeeds, the entire argument will fail to establish its conclusion. It begins with a statement of an alleged (...)
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  3. Replies.James P. Sterba - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):223-228.
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  4. Analyzing Sterba’s Argument.Michael Tooley - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):217-222.
  5. Introduction to the symposium.Michael S. Jones - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (3):201-202.
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  6. An Axiological-Trajectory Theodicy.Thomas Metcalf - 2020 - Sophia:1-16.
    I develop a new theodicy in defense of Anselmian theism, one that has several advantages over traditional and recent replies to the Problem of Evil. To make my case, I first explain the value of a positive trajectory: a forward-in-time decrease in ‘first-order-gratuitous’ evil: evil that is not necessary for any equal-or-greater first-order good, but may be necessary for a higher-order good, such as the good of strongly positive axiological trajectory. Positive trajectory arguably contributes goodness to a world in proportion (...)
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  7. What If God Commanded Something Horrible? A Pragmatics-Based Defence of Divine Command Metaethics.Philipp Kremers - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-21.
    The objection of horrible commands claims that divine command metaethics is doomed to failure because it is committed to the extremely counterintuitive assumption that torture of innocents, rape, and murder would be morally obligatory if God commanded these acts. Morriston, Wielenberg, and Sinnott-Armstrong have argued that formulating this objection in terms of counterpossibles is particularly forceful because it cannot be simply evaded by insisting on God’s necessary perfect moral goodness. I show that divine command metaethics can be defended even against (...)
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  8. Descartes' Demon--More Powerful and Just Than God?Joshua M. Hall - 2015 - In Benjamin McCraw & Rob Arp (eds.), Philosophical Approaches to the Devil. New York, NY, USA: pp. 106-118.
    The demon is, in the thinker,s words, "supremely powerful and clever", and it is only the combination of these two traits with the demon's incessant deception that empowers Descartes to stage the radical doubt that will terminate in his attempted proofs of God and the material world. The reason the demon is necessary is that the thinker cannot prove that it would be wrong for God to allow us to be deceived occasionally. Thus, Descartes needed, methodologically and rhetorically, something more (...)
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  9. Adorno and Arendt: Evil, Modernity and the Underside of Theodicy.Terence Holden - 2019 - Sophia 58 (2):197-224.
    The point of departure for this article is a comparative study of Adorno and Arendt on the question of evil and modernity. To be precise, I observe how Adorno and Arendt present us with very different ways of understanding radical evil as an expression of the modern project of acceleration. This divergence presents us with a problematic which does not fit easily into the framework of the contemporary post-metaphysical engagement with evil. The latter projects a relational, non-substantive concept of evil (...)
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  10. Resistance: Its Nature, Virtues, and Application to Matters of Faith.Nicholas Michael Colgrove - 2019 - Dissertation, Baylor University
    There are many cries to resist particular objects (e.g. inequality in the workplace) but very little is said concerning the nature of resistance. As such, this project begins by mapping the concept of resistance. Next, I develop several tools that allow us to distinguish between reasonable and unreasonable instances of resistance. I then argue that many versions of “the problem of evil” are actually instances of resistance. As such, these versions of the problem of evil are subject to the tools (...)
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  11. The Ego and the Spirit, Chapter 1.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    This is the first chapter of a projected book to be entitled, The Ego and the Spirit. This book will endeavor to examine what lies at the heart of human spiritual aspiration from a psychological, philosophical, and religious perspective. In this first chapter, I discuss the predicament of the human ego, charged with a task that it cannot fulfill: To establish itself securely within being. The ego's efforts to fulfill this task through its dealings with the things and people of (...)
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  12. Reconsidering the Problem of Evil: The International Context of the Early Modern Discussion1.Yu Liu - 2006 - The European Legacy 11 (1):21-33.
    The problem of evil has recently gained renewed attention. As before, what is so mind-boggling is not just the horrific aggression of man against man but the fact of offenders not easily being demonized into new versions of Iago or Macbeth. Somehow, what Hannah Arendt terms “the fearsome, word-and-thought-defying banality of evil” has to be dealt with, but the very effort to do so can be problematic if the idea of original sin is somehow resurrected. To examine the issue beyond (...)
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  13. The Apologetics of Evil. The Case of Iago. [REVIEW]Josep E. Corbí - 2012 - Disputatio 4 (33):531-539.
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  14. Beyond Theodicy: The Divine in Heidegger and Tragedy.Robert S. Gall - 1985 - Philosophy Today 29 (2):110-120.
    The paper explores the way in which we can make sense of the seemingly contradictory presentations of God and the gods in tragic literature by looking to the thought of Martin Heidegger. The duplicity of the gods in tragedy is found to be a function of the uncertainty and questionworthiness of being.
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  15. Belief in a Good and Loving God: A Case Study in the Varieties of a Religious Belief.Gabriel Citron - 2014 - In Andrew Moore (ed.), God, Mind and Knowledge. Farnham, UK: Routledge. pp. 67-86.
    There has been much recent debate over the meaning of the claim that God is good and loving. Although the participants in this debate strongly disagree over the correct analysis of the claim, there is nonetheless agreement across all parties that there is a single correct analysis. This paper aims to overthrow this consensus, by showing that sentences such as ‘There is a good and loving God’ are often used to express a variety of beliefs with quite different logico-grammatical characteristics. (...)
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  16. Book Review: The Genealogy of Violence: Reflections on Creation, Freedom, and EvilThe Genealogy of Violence: Reflections on Creation, Freedom, and EvilbyBellingerCharles K.Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2001. 157 Pp. $32.00. ISBN 0-19-513498-2. [REVIEW]Lee C. Barrett - 2002 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 56 (2):222-222.
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  17. Facing Evil: Evil's Many Faces.Susan L. Nelson - 2003 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 57 (4):398-413.
    Evil is both the experience of suffering and the fear that suffering subverts all meaning and order in the world. Given evil's many faces, at least five paradigms can be identified to account for God's relationship to suffering.
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  18. Augustine and Aquinas on Demonic Possession in Advance.Seamus O'Neill - 2017 Online Firs - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
    Augustine asserted that demons (and angels) have material bodies, while Aquinas denied demonic corporeality, upholding that demons are separated, incorporeal, intelligible substances. Augustine’s conception of demons as composite substances possessing an immaterial soul and an aerial body is insufficient, in Thomas’s view, to account for certain empirical phenomena observed in demoniacs. However, Thomas, while providing more detailed accounts of demonic possession according to his development of Aristotelian psychology, does not avail of this demonic incorporeal eminence when analysing demonic attacks: demonic (...)
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  19. The Problem of Problems.Aryeh Siegel - 1981 - ReVISION - A Journal of Consciousness and Change 4 (2):32-39.
    The problem of evil might better be called "the problem of problems." That there is "evil" in the world can be expressed most generally by saying that there are problems with the way things are, that at least something is not the way it should be. I shall propose that the various possible resolutions of the problem of evil correspond to varying approaches that people generally take to the problems in their lives. In this way, a connection can be made (...)
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  20. Evil and Original Sin.Paul Copan - 2013 - In Chad Meister & James K. Dew (eds.), God and Evil: The Case for God in a World Filled with Pain. Downer's Grove: InterVarsity Press. pp. 124–137.
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  21. God and Evil.Aryeh Siegel - 2016 - Efrat, Israel: Joy of Life Seminars.
  22. The Spirit and the Ego: A Brief Cognitive Model for the Spiritual Path.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In this very brief piece, I outline a way of thinking about spiritual pursuits.
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  23. The Logic and Limits of the Free Will Argument: An Eschatological Reconsideration.Matthew D. Lundberg - 2016 - Modern Theology 32 (2):170-186.
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  24. Privation, Parasite Et Perversion de la Volonté.Seamus O’Neill - 2017 - Laval Théologique et Philosophique 73 (1):31-52.
    Augustin est bien connu comme défenseur d’une « théorie privative » du mal. On peut lire, par exemple, dans les Confessions que « le mal n’est que la privation du bien, à la limite du pur néant ». Le problème, cependant, avec les théories privatives du mal est qu’elles ne nous offrent pas, généralement, une explication robuste ni de l’activité du mal, ni de son pouvoir à causer des effets bien réels ; effets desquels l’expérience demande, malgré tout, une explication (...)
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  25. Keeping the Faith: On Being Good and How Not to Be Evil.Alex Ling - 2006 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 2 (1-2):359-364.
    Review of Alain Badiou, emEthics: An Essay on the Understanding of Evil/em, trans. Peter Hallward, New York, Verso, 2001. ISBN: 1-85984-435-9br /.
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  26. Untamed God or Reckless Risk-Taker? A Reply to Hasker's Natural Order Theodicy.S. Justice Nathan - unknown
    This paper argues that Molinism best rebuts the problem of natural evil when compared to the attempts of Open Theists, particularly William Hasker. The author begins by summarizing Hasker's own Natural Order Theodicy, and subsequently critiques it. He finds no issues with the proposed theodicy, but takes issue with Hasker's attempt to establish the coherence of Open Theism from this theodicy. He then explains the weaknesses of Open Theism's response to natural evil, and simultaneously argues for the strength of Molinism's (...)
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  27. Steps on the Spiritual Ladder: Suffering and Bliss in the Heart of God.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    Whence comes suffering? If the divine reality is a reality of bliss, and all is derived from this divine reality, how can suffering arise? Does the reality of God contain suffering? Might suffering be understood as a mode of bliss? These are the questions I take up in this essay. I suggest that the various states of suffering may best be understood as fragments of bliss, progressively resolved as fragmentation is overcome. Spiritual life is the progressive movement from the suffering (...)
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  28. The Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives.Elizabeth V. Spelman - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):229-232.
  29. Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy.Robin May Schott - 2002 - Hypatia 18 (2):222-226.
  30. Inclusive Feminism: A Third Wave Theory of Women's Commonality. Naomi Zack. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2005.Elizabeth V. Spelman - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):201-204.
  31. Why Almost All Moral Critique of Theodicies is Misplaced: Atle O. Søvik.Atle O. Søvik - 2008 - Religious Studies 44 (4):479-484.
    Much moral critique of theodicies is misplaced. Firstly, much of the critique begs the question because it presupposes something else to be true than what the theodicy claims; had the theodicy been true, it would not be immoral. Secondly, much of the moral critique shows situations where theodicies are inappropriate, and argues that they should never be communicated because of these situations. But if a theory is true, there will be some situations where it is appropriate to communicate it, and (...)
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  32. Evil and the Justice of God. By N. T. Wright: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]James R. A. Merrick - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (1):152-154.
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  33. A New Approach on the Long-Standing Problem of Evil: Maria Pia Lara, Narrating Evil: A Postmetaphysical Theory of Reflective Judgment (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007), 230 Pp.Mario Hernández - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (3):357-362.
    In recent years, discussion on evil as a philosophical problem has increased. However, there is a tendency to see this problem from an aesthetic point of view, to frame it in theodicy's plot, or even to suggest silence in front of those extreme forms of evil that are linked to specific episodes, such as totalitarianism or ethnic cleansing. This review article focuses on María Pía Lara's development of a postmetaphysical theory of evil in her book Narrating Evil. The main purpose (...)
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  34. God and Evil. [REVIEW]J. K. T. - 1976 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (1):133-134.
    McCloskey presents a powerful case for the view, already well argued in briefer form by Mackie, Flew, McCloskey, and others, that the existence of evil—any and particularly actual evil-is, if not logically, morally incompatible with the existence of an omnipotent, omniscient, all-good creator. While he promises to "take up the challenge" of certain theists who claim no logical contradiction is implied in the position God and evil exist, aside from a few ad hominem arguments directed Plantinga’s way he seems finally (...)
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  35. The Seven Deadly Sins. [REVIEW]F. E. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (3):641-642.
    This work is a "prolegomena to the study of evil," the beginning of a more ambitious project designated by the author an "ideational critique of society." Such an endeavor would include a "rhetoric that grasps the structures of consciousness, the phenomenology of history, and the dramaturgy of contemporary scenes." The bulk of the present study constitutes an essay in phenomenological sociology. Each of the seven deadly sins is insightfully described in terms of its dominant features as well as in relation (...)
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  36. “The Shadow of This Crime . . . Is Over Me Yet”: Narrative Discourse and the Knowledge of Evil in Barry Unsworth’s Morality Play.J. Cameron Moore - 2012 - Renascence 64 (4):321-340.
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  37. A Refutation of Drange’s Arguments From Evil and Nonbelief.Christopher McHugh - 2002 - Philo 5 (1):94-102.
    In this article, two of Theodore Drange’s atheological arguments against the God of Christianity are refuted by what I call the “Expectations Defense.” By means of this defense, it is shown that, despite what Drange argues, the existence of evil and unbelief cannot be used as evidence against the existence of the God of the Bible. The fact that biblical history describes God as allowing there to be vast amounts of evil and unbelief prevents us from citing the existence of (...)
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  38. In Defense of Non-Natural Theistic Realism: A Response to Wielenberg.William J. Wainwright - 2010 - Faith and Philosophy 27 (4):457-463.
    Eric Wielenberg and I agree that basic moral truths are necessarily true. But Wielenberg thinks that, because these truths are necessary, they require no explanation, and I do not: some basic moral truths are not self-explanatory. I argue that Wielenberg’s reasons for thinking that my justification of that claim is inadequate are ultimately unconvincing.
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  39. The Crooked Wood of Humanity: Kant’s Struggle With Radical Evil.John L. Treloar - 1989 - Philosophy and Theology 3 (4):335-353.
    During the latter part of his career, Kant proposes three different accounts of evil. In these accounts are found psychological, logical, and teleological elements intetwoven in such a way as to give a coherent reading of evil as a complex philosophical issue. Recent commentators have emphasized one or the other of these two elements and consequently have only given a partial picture of Kant’s struggle with evil. I argue that Kant’s use of scripture needs to be taken much more seriously (...)
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  40. The End of Philosophy of Religion. By Nick Trakakis. Pp Viii, 172. London, Continuum, 2008, £60.00. [REVIEW]Tyrone Goldschmidt - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (4):753-754.
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  41. The End of Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]J. Aaron Simmons - 2012 - Sophia 51 (3):407-410.
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  42. The Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives. [REVIEW]Adam Morton - 2002 - The Monist 85 (2):337-338.
    Amélie Rorty has put together a wonderfully varied collection of writings, with a range in time of three thousand years and a range of style from sacred writings to fiction to analytical philosophy. There is nothing like it in print, and it will be an invaluable source for many of us. The writings she has collected are all about—well, I’m not sure that there is something that they are all about. The title suggests that the collection is about a phenomenon (...)
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  43. Conflicting Motifs in Ibn Gabirol’s Discussion of Matter and Evil.T. M. Rudavsky - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (1):54-71.
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  44. Moral Evil and the Existence of God: A Reply.Theodore J. Kondoleon - 1973 - New Scholasticism 47 (3):366-374.
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  45. Evil as Evidence Against the Existence of God.David Basinger - 1978 - Philosophy Research Archives 4:55-67.
    Robert Pargetter has recently argued that, even if the theist cannot produce plausible explanations for the evil we experience, the atheologian has no justifiable basis for claiming that evil can in any sense count as strong evidence against God's existence. His strategy is to challenge as question-begging the atheologian's assumption that a prima facie conflict between God and evil exists and the atheologian's claim that God's nonexistence is a more plausible explanation for unresolved evil than a number of theistic options. (...)
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  46. The Cambridge Companion to the Problem of Evil.Meister Chad & Moser Paul (eds.) - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    For many centuries philosophers have been discussing the problem of evil - one of the greatest problems of intellectual history. There are many facets to the problem, and for students and scholars unfamiliar with the vast literature on the subject, grasping the main issues can be a daunting task. This Companion provides a stimulating introduction to the problem of evil. More than an introduction to the subject, it is a state-of-the-art contribution to the field which provides critical analyses of and (...)
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  47. Evil and the Christian Faith.Herman Brautigam & Nels F. S. Ferre - 1948 - Philosophical Review 57 (6):623.
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  48. The Problem of Evil in Early Modern Philosophy.Michael J. Latzer & Elmar J. Kremer (eds.) - 2001 - University of Toronto Press.
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  49. Evil: A History in Modern French Literature and Thought. By Damian Catani. Pp. Vi, 222, London/NY, Blooomsbury, 2013, £60.00. [REVIEW]Terrance Klein - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (5):860-861.
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  50. Wisdom and Evil.Nancy E. Snow - unknown
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