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  1. Asymmetry and Evolution.William L. Abler - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (2):277.
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  2. What Determines Evolutionary Brain Growth?Francisco Aboitiz - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):278-279.
    Finlay et al. address the importance of developmental constraints in brain size evolution. I discuss some aspects of this view such as the relation of brain size with processing capacity. In particular, I argue that in human evolution there must have been specific selection for increased processing capacity, and as a consequence for increased brain size.
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  3. An Interdisciplinary Approach to Brain Evolution: A Long Due Debate.Francisco Aboitiz, Daniver Morales & Juan Montiel - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (5):572-576.
    A dorsalization mechanism is a good candidate for the evolutionary origin of the isocortex, producing a radial and tangential expansion of the dorsal pallium (and perhaps other structures that acquired a cortical phenotype). Evidence suggests that a large part of the dorsal ventricular ridge (DVR) of reptiles and birds derives from the embryonic ventral pallium, whereas the isocortex possibly derives mostly from the dorsal pallium. In early mammals, the development of olfactory-hippocampal associative networks may have been pivotal in facilitating the (...)
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  4. Prelinguistic Evolution and Motherese: A Hypothesis on the Neural Substrates.Francisco Aboitiz & Carolina G. Schröter - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):503-504.
    In early hominins, there possibly was high selective pressure for the development of reciprocal mother and child vocalizations such as proposed by Falk. In this context, temporoparietal-prefrontal networks that participate in tasks such as working memory and imitation may have been strongly selected for. These networks may have become the precursors of the future language areas of the human brain.
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  5. The Evolution of Science and “Principles of Impossibility”.Victor G. Adamenko - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (4):566.
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  6. Your Divided Attention, Please! The Maintenance of Multiple Attentional Control Sets Over Distinct Regions in Space.Maha Adamo, Carson Pun, Jay Pratt & Susanne Ferber - 2008 - Cognition 107 (1):295-303.
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  7. Immunoselection and Male Diseases.Matteo Adinolfi - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (3):441-442.
  8. Brain Evolution: Part I.Elizabeth Adkins-Regan - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (1):12-13.
    Striedter's accessible concept-based book is strong on the macroevolution of brains and the developmental principles that underlie how brains evolve on that scale. In the absence of greater attention to microevolution, natural selection, and sexual selection, however, it is incomplete and not fully modern on the evolution side. Greater biological integration is needed.
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  9. Becoming Human, Together.Guler Cansu Agoren - forthcoming - Biological Theory.
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  10. Cruelty May Be a Self-Control Device Against Sympathy.George Ainslie - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):224-225.
    Dispassionate cruelty and the euphoria of hunting or battle should be distinguished from the emotional savoring of victims' suffering. Such savoring, best called negative empathy, is what puzzles motivational theory. Hyperbolic discounting theory suggests that sympathy with people who have unwanted but seductive traits creates a threat to self-control. Cruelty to those people may often be the least effortful way of countering this threat.
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  11. More Than Mere Coloring: The Art of Spectral Vision.Kathleen A. Akins & John Lamping - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):26-27.
  12. Evolutionary Psychology and Bayesian Modeling.Laith Al-Shawaf & David Buss - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (4):188-189.
    The target article provides important theoretical contributions to psychology and Bayesian modeling. Despite the article's excellent points, we suggest that it succumbs to a few misconceptions about evolutionary psychology (EP). These include a mischaracterization of evolutionary psychology's approach to optimality; failure to appreciate the centrality of mechanism in EP; and an incorrect depiction of hypothesis testing. An accurate characterization of EP offers more promise for successful integration with Bayesian modeling.
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  13. The Nature of Nurturant Niches in Ontogeny.Jeffrey R. Alberts - 2008 - Philosophical Psychology 21 (3):295 – 303.
    The concept of ontogenetic niche is used here to interpret how species-typical behaviors develop through active, context-dependent processes. Ontogenetic niches typically include social stimuli, such as those arising from parents, siblings, and others that provide 'nurturing' in the form of resources, stimulation, and affordances for development. This approach is a useful alternative to wrestling with artificial dichotomies such as nature-nurture.
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  14. Ritual Harmony: Toward an Evolutionary Theory of Music.Candace S. Alcorta, Richard Sosis & Daniel Finkel - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):576-577.
    Juslin & Vll (J&V) advance our understanding of the proximate mechanisms underlying emotional responses to music, but fail to integrate their findings into a comprehensive evolutionary model that addresses the adaptive functions of these responses. Here we offer such a model by examining the ontogenetic relationship between music, ritual, and symbolic abstraction and their role in facilitating social coordination and cooperation.
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  15. Genes Can Disconnect the Social Brain in More Than One Way.André Aleman & René S. Kahn - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):855-855.
    Burns proposes an intriguing hypothesis by suggesting that the “schizophrenia genes” might not be regulatory genes themselves, but rather closely associated with regulatory genes directly involved in the proper growth of the social brain. We point out that this account would benefit from incorporating the effects of localized lesions and aberrant hemispheric asymmetry on cortical connectivity underlying the social brain. In addition, we argue that the evolutionary framework is superfluous.
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  16. Evolution, Human Behavior, and Determinism.Richard D. Alexander - 1976 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:3 - 21.
  17. Review Essay: Tools, Language and Cognition in Human Evolution.Dan Moonhawk Alford - 1996 - Anthropology of Consciousness 7 (2):24-28.
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  18. Evidence for an Evolved Adaptation to Rape? Not Yet.Elizabeth Rice Allgeier & Michael W. Wiederman - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):377-379.
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  19. Genetic and Cultural Evolution: The Gap, the Bridge,… and Beyond.José-Maria G. Almeida - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):738.
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  20. Mathematical Models for Gene–Culture Coevolution.Joseph S. Alper & Robert V. Lange - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):739.
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  21. Doctor Dennett and Doctor Pangloss: Perfection and Selection in Biology and Psychology.Ron Amundson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (3):577-581.
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  22. Is Human Cognition Adaptive?John R. Anderson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):471-485.
  23. Adaptationism, Exaptationism, and Evolutionary Behavioral Science.Paul W. Andrews, Steven W. Gangestad & Dan Matthews - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):534-547.
    In our target article, we discussed the standards of evidence that could be used to identify adaptations, and argued that building an empirical case that certain features of a trait are best explained by exaptation, spandrel, or constraint requires the consideration, testing, and rejection of adaptationist hypotheses. We are grateful to the 31 commentators for their thoughtful insights. They raised important issues, including the meaning of “exaptation”; whether Gould and Lewontin's critique of adaptationism was primarily epistemological or ontological; the necessity, (...)
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  24. Adaptationism – How to Carry Out an Exaptationist Program.Paul W. Andrews, Steven W. Gangestad & Dan Matthews - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):489-504.
    1 Adaptationism is a research strategy that seeks to identify adaptations and the specific selective forces that drove their evolution in past environments. Since the mid-1970s, paleontologist Stephen J. Gould and geneticist Richard Lewontin have been critical of adaptationism, especially as applied toward understanding human behavior and cognition. Perhaps the most prominent criticism they made was that adaptationist explanations were analogous to Rudyard Kipling's Just So Stories. Since storytelling is an inherent part of science, the criticism refers to the acceptance (...)
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  25. Myths of First Cause and Asymmetries in Human Evolution.Marian Annett - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):208-209.
    The causes of asymmetries for handedness and cerebral speech are of scientific interest, but is it sensible to try to determine which of these came first? I argue that (1) first causes belong to mythology, not science; (2) much of the cited evidence is weak; and (3) the treatment of individual differences is inadequate in comparison with the right shift theory.
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  26. Mental Disorders, Evolution, and Inclusive Fitness.Antonio Preti & Paola Miotto - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):419-420.
    Grouping severe mental disorders into a global category is likely to lead to a “theory of everything” which forcefully explains everything and nothing. Speculation even at the phenotypic level of the single disorder cannot be fruitful, unless specific and testable models are proposed. Inclusive fitness must be incorporated in such models. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  27. Modest Adaptationism: Muddling Through Cognition and Language.Scott Atran - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):504-506.
    Strong adaptationists would explain complex organic designs as specific adaptations to particular ancestral environments. Weak adaptationists don't assume that complex organic functioning represents evolutionary design in the sense of niche-specific adaptation. For some domain-specific competencies (folkbiology) strong adaptationism is useful, not necessary. With group-level belief systems (religion), strong adaptationism can become spurious pseudo-adaptationism. In other cases (language), weak adaptationism proves productive.
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  28. Sociobiology: The Whisperings Within.R. D. Attenborough - 1981 - Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (2):249.
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  29. Ultimate and Proximate Influences on Human Sex Differences.Drew H. Bailey, Jonathan K. Oxford & David C. Geary - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):266-267.
    We agree with Archer that human sex differences in aggression are well explained by sexual selection, but note that explanations of human behaviors are not logically mutually exclusive from explanations and therefore should not be framed as such. We discuss why this type of framing hinders the development of both social learning and evolutionary theories of human behavior.
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  30. The Biology of Bird-Song Dialects.Myron Charles Baker & Michael A. Cunningham - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):85-100.
  31. Human Ethology and Human Sociobiology.David P. Barash - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):26-27.
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  32. Proximate and Ultimate Causes of Punishment and Strong Reciprocity.Pat Barclay & Francesco Guala - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (1):16.
    While admirable, Guala's discussion of reciprocity suffers from a confusion between proximate causes (psychological mechanisms triggering behaviour) and ultimate causes (evolved function of those psychological mechanisms). Because much work on commits this error, I clarify the difference between proximate and ultimate causes of cooperation and punishment. I also caution against hasty rejections of of experimental evidence.
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  33. What is the Evolutionary Basis for Colic?Kim A. Bard - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):459-459.
    An evolutionary model of crying requires consideration of nonhuman primate data. Chimpanzees do not have colic. Although they have a peak of fussiness at 6 weeks with a decline by 12 weeks whether raised by biological mothers or in a human nursery, their crying is always consolable. Colic may be a by-product of delayed rates of brain development; that is, neoteny.
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  34. Barash: Sociobiology and Behavior.Martin Barker - 1980 - Radical Philosophy 24:27.
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  35. The Adapted Mind and Biologically Unanticipated Culture.J. H. Barkow - 1992 - In Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.), The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press.
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  36. Leda Cosmoides, and John Tooby, Eds.Jerome H. Barkow - 1992 - In Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.), The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press.
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  37. Précis of Darwin, Sex and Status: Biological Approaches to Mind and Culture.Jerome H. Barkow - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):295-301.
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  38. Central Problems of Sociobiology.Jerome H. Barkow - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):188.
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  39. Are All Bases Covered?Louise Barrett & S. Peter Henzi - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):506-507.
    In addition to ensuring that appropriate standards of evidence are employed when attempting to identify adaptations, researchers should investigate all nonevolutionary factors that could potentially explain their results. Evolutionary analyses may be undermined by alternative, non-evolutionary explanations either because not all relevant information is included in an evolutionary analysis, or because inappropriate methods incapable of detecting an adaptation are employed.
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  40. Sociobiology and Human Politics.Patrick Bateson - 1986 - In Steven P. R. Rose & Lisa Appignanesi (eds.), Science and Beyond. B. Blackwell in Association with the Institute of Contemporary Arts. pp. 79--99.
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  41. Uncritical Periods and Insensitive Sociobiology.Patrick Bateson - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):102.
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  42. Seeing the Light: What Does Biology Tell Us About Human Social Behavior?C. Daniel Batson - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):610.
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  43. Does Sexual Selection Explain Why Human Aggression Peaks in Early Childhood?Christina Behme - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):267-268.
    Archer provides seemingly compelling evidence for his claim that sexual selection explains sex differences in human aggression better than social role theory. I challenge Archer's interpretation of some of this evidence. I argue that the same evidence could be used to support the claim that what has been selected for is the ability to curb aggression and discuss implications for Archer's theory.
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  44. From Love to Evolution: Historical Turning Point in the Psychology of Religion.Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi - 2006 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 28 (1):49-61.
    Kirkpatrick's contribution is evaluated in the context of historical developments and persistent crisis in the psychology of religion. The field has been characterized by the lack of a unifying theory, as well as by some literature being driven by religious apologetics. Kirkpatrick's approach has been truly theory-driven, always seeking a general psychological framework for analyzing religion and religiosity. His personal odyssey led him to embrace Bowlby's attachment theory, which has had a unique impact of research in academic psychology. But then (...)
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  45. The Implications of Sociobiology for Education.B. J. Benham - 2010 - Educational Studies 9 (3):247-254.
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  46. The Implications of Sociobiology for Education.B. J. Benham - 1978 - Educational Studies 9 (3):247-254.
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  47. Functions of Play: First Steps Toward Evolutionary Explanation.C. M. Berman - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):157.
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  48. Saving Sociobiology: The Use and Abuse of Logic.Irwin S. Bernstein - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):73.
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  49. The Role of a Behavior in Evolution.Geoffrey P. Bingham - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (2):346-347.
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  50. Evolved to Be Irrational?: Evolutionary and Cognitive Foundations of Pseudosciences.Stefaan Blancke & Johan De Smedt - 2013 - In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press.
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