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  1. How Did Language Evolve? Some Reflections on the Language Parasite Debate.Tzu-wei Hung - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (4):214-223.
    The language parasite approach refers to the view that language, like a parasite, is an adaptive system that evolves to fit its human hosts. Supported by recent computer simulations, LPA proponents claim that the reason that humans can use languages with ease is not because we have evolved with genetically specified linguistic instincts but because languages have adapted to the preexisting brain structures of humans. This article examines the LPA. It argues that, while the LPA has advantages over its rival, (...)
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  2. The Social Evolution of Human Nature: From Biology to Language. [REVIEW]Ryan M. Nefdt - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (277):874-877.
    The Social Evolution of Human Nature: From Biology to Language. By Smit Harry.
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  3. The Role of Assessor Teaching in Human Culture.Laureano Castro, Miguel Ángel Castro-Nogueira, Morris Villarroel & Miguel Ángel Toro - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (2):112-121.
    According to the dual inheritance theory, cultural learning in our species is a biased and highly efficient process of transmitting cultural traits. Here we define a model of cultural learning where social learning is integrated as a complementary element that facilitates the discovery of a specific behavior by an apprentice, and not as a mechanism that works in opposition to individual learning. In that context, we propose that the emergence of the ability to approve or disapprove of offspring behavior, orienting (...)
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  4. Are Sexes Natural Kinds?Muhammad Ali Khalidi - forthcoming - In Shamik Dasgupta & Brad Weslake (eds.), Current Controversies in Philosophy of Science.
    Asking whether the sexes are natural kinds amounts to asking whether the categories, female and male, identify real divisions in nature, like the distinctions between biological species, or whether they mark merely artificial or arbitrary distinctions. The distinction between females and males in the animal kingdom is based on the relative size of the gametes they produce, with females producing larger gametes (ova) and males producing smaller gametes (sperm). This chapter argues that the properties of producing relatively large and small (...)
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  5. Collectivized Intellectualism.Julia Jael Smith & Benjamin Wald - 2019 - Res Philosophica 96 (2):199-227.
    We argue that the evolutionary function of reasoning is to allow us to secure more accurate beliefs and more effective intentions through collective deliberation. This sets our view apart both from traditional intellectualist accounts, which take the evolutionary function to be individual deliberation, and from interactionist accounts such as the one proposed by Mercier and Sperber, which agrees that the function of reasoning is collective but holds that it aims to disseminate, rather than come up with, accurate beliefs. We argue (...)
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  6. From Hominid to Human.Agustín Fuentes & Marc Kissel - 2016 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 3 (2):217.
  7. From Hominid to Human.Agustín Fuentes & Marc Kissel - 2016 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 3 (2):217.
  8. The Evolved Apprentice: How Evolution Made Humans Unique by Sterelny, Kim: Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2012, Pp. 264, US$35. [REVIEW]Chris Haufe - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):407-410.
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  9. Cultural Exaptation and Cultural Neural Reuse: A Mechanism for the Emergence of Modern Culture and Behavior.Francesco D’Errico & Ivan Colagè - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (4):213-227.
    On the basis of recent advancements in both neuroscience and archaeology, we propose a plausible biocultural mechanism at the basis of cultural evolution. The proposed mechanism, which relies on the notions of cultural exaptation and cultural neural reuse, may account for the asynchronous, discontinuous, and patchy emergence of innovations around the globe. Cultural exaptation refers to the reuse of previously devised cultural features for new purposes. Cultural neural reuse refers to cases in which exposure to cultural practices induces the formation, (...)
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  10. Integrative and Separationist Perspectives: Understanding the Causal Role of Cultural Transmission in Human Language Evolution.Francesco Suman - 2018 - Biological Theory 13 (4):246-260.
    Biological evolution and cultural evolution are distinct evolutionary processes; they are apparent also in human language, where both processes contributed in shaping its evolution. However, the nature of the interaction between these two processes is still debated today. It is often claimed that the emergence of modern language was preceded by the evolution of a language-ready brain: the latter is usually intended as a product of biological evolution, while the former is believed to be the consequence of cultural processes. I (...)
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  11. Is God an Adaptation?: Robert Wright’s, The Evolution of God, Little Brown, 2009.Hugo Viciana & Pierrick Bourrat - 2011 - Philosophia 39 (2):397-408.
    In this critical notice to Robert Wright’s The Evolution of God, we focus on the question of whether Wright’s God is one which can be said to be an adaptation in a well defined sense. Thus we evaluate the likelihood of different models of adaptive evolution of cultural ideas in their different levels of selection. Our result is an emphasis on the plurality of mechanisms that may lead to adaptation. By way of conclusion we assess epistemologically some of Wright’s more (...)
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  12. Replicate After Reading: On the Extraction and Evocation of Cultural Information.Maarten Boudry - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (3-4):27.
    Does cultural evolution happen by a process of copying or replication? And how exactly does cultural transmission compare with that paradigmatic case of replication, the copying of DNA in living cells? Theorists of cultural evolution are divided on these issues. The most important objection to the replication model has been leveled by Dan Sperber and his colleagues. Cultural transmission, they argue, is almost always reconstructive and transformative, while strict ‘replication’ can be seen as a rare limiting case at most. By (...)
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  13. The Structure of Biological Science. Alexander Rosenberg.John Dupre - 1986 - Philosophy of Science 53 (3):461-463.
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  14. Brian Skyrms, Signals: Evolution, Learning, and Information. New York: Oxford University Press , 208 Pp., $27.00.Rory Smead - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (4):702-705.
  15. Book ReviewsPeter Singer,. A Darwinian Left: Politics, Evolution, and Cooperation. Darwinism Today.New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 2000. Pp. Ix+70. $9.95. [REVIEW]Philip Kitcher - 2002 - Ethics 112 (4):861-863.
  16. Self Domestication and the Evolution of Language.James Thomas & Simon Kirby - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (1-2):9.
    We set out an account of how self-domestication plays a crucial role in the evolution of language. In doing so, we focus on the growing body of work that treats language structure as emerging from the process of cultural transmission. We argue that a full recognition of the importance of cultural transmission fundamentally changes the kind of questions we should be asking regarding the biological basis of language structure. If we think of language structure as reflecting an accumulated set of (...)
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  17. Cultural Evolution and the Social Sciences: A Case of Unification?Catherine Driscoll - 2018 - Biology and Philosophy 33 (1-2):7.
    This paper addresses the question of how to understand the relationship between Cultural Evolutionary Science and the social sciences, given that they coexist and both study cultural change. I argue that CES is best understood as having a unificatory or integrative role between evolutionary biology and the social sciences, and that it is best characterized as a bridge field; I describe the concept of a bridge field and how it relates to other non-reductionist accounts of unification or integration used in (...)
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  18. How Language Couldn’T Have Evolved: A Critical Examination of Berwick and Chomsky’s Theory of Language Evolution.Ronald Planer - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):779-796.
    This article examines some recent work by Berwick and Chomsky as presented in their book Why Only Us? Language and Evolution. As I understand them, Berwick and Chomsky’s overarching purpose is to explain how human language could have arisen in so short an evolutionary period. After articulating their strategy, I argue that they fall far short of reaching this goal. A co-evolutionary scenario linking the mechanisms that realize the language system, both with one other and with cognitive mechanisms capable of (...)
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  19. From Code to Speaker Meaning.Kim Sterelny - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):819-838.
    This paper has two aims. One is to defend an incrementalist view of the evolution of language, not from those who think that syntax could not evolve incrementally, but from those who defend a fundamental distinction between Gricean communication or ostensive inferential communication and code-based communication. The paper argues against this dichotomy, and sketches ways in which a code-based system could evolve into Gricean communication. The second is to assess the merits of the Sender–Receiver Framework, originally formulated by David Lewis, (...)
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  20. Mating Dances and the Evolution of Language: What’s the Next Step?Cameron Buckner & Keyao Yang - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1289-1316.
    The Darwinian protolanguage hypothesis is one of the most popular theories of the evolution of human language. According to this hypothesis, language evolved through a three stage process involving general increases in intelligence, the emergence of grammatical structure as a result of sexual selection on protomusical songs, and finally the attachment of meaning to the components of those songs. The strongest evidence for the second stage of this process has been considered to be birdsong, and as a result researchers have (...)
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  21. The Evolution of Linguistic Rules.Matthew Spike - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):887-904.
    Rule-like behaviour is found throughout human language, provoking a number of apparently conflicting explanations. This paper frames the topic in terms of Tinbergen’s four questions and works within the context of rule-like behaviour seen both in nature and the non-linguistic domain in humans. I argue for a minimal account of linguistic rules which relies on powerful domain-general cognition, has a communicative function allowing for multiple engineering solutions, and evolves mainly culturally, while leaving the door open for some genetic adaptation in (...)
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  22. Complexity and Technological Evolution: What Everybody Knows?Krist Vaesen & Wybo Houkes - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):1245-1268.
    The consensus among cultural evolutionists seems to be that human cultural evolution is cumulative, which is commonly understood in the specific sense that cultural traits, especially technological traits, increase in complexity over generations. Here we argue that there is insufficient credible evidence in favor of or against this technological complexity thesis. For one thing, the few datasets that are available hardly constitute a representative sample. For another, they substantiate very specific, and usually different versions of the complexity thesis or, even (...)
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  23. Did Language Evolve in Multilingual Settings?Nicholas Evans - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (6):905-933.
    Accounts of language evolution have largely suffered from a monolingual bias, assuming that language evolved in a single isolated community sharing most speech conventions. Rather, evidence from the small-scale societies who form the best simulacra available for ancestral human communities suggests that the combination of small societal scale and out-marriage pushed ancestral human communities to make use of multiple linguistic systems. Evolutionary innovations would have occurred in a number of separate communities, distributing the labor of structural invention between populations, and (...)
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  24. Tim Lewens, Cultural Evolution: Conceptual Challenges, Oxford University Press, X + 205. P. 2015. $45.00.Peter J. Richerson - 2016 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 38 (4).
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  25. The Transition From Animal to Linguistic Communication.Harry Smit - 2016 - Biological Theory 11 (3):158-172.
    Darwin’s theory predicts that linguistic behavior gradually evolved out of animal forms of communication. However, this prediction is confronted by the conceptual problem that there is an essential difference between signaling and linguistic behavior: using words is a normative practice. It is argued that we can resolve this problem if we note that language evolution is the outcome of an evolutionary transition, and observe that the use of words evolves during ontogenesis out of babbling. It is discussed that language evolved (...)
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  26. Cumulative Cultural Evolution and the Origins of Language.Kim Sterelny - 2016 - Biological Theory 11 (3):173-186.
    In this article, I present a substantive proposal about the timing and nature of the final stage of the evolution of full human language, the transition from so-called “protolanguage” to language, and on the origins of a simple protolanguage with structure and displaced reference; a proposal that depends on the idea that the initial expansion of communicative powers in our lineage involved a much expanded role for gesture and mime. But though it defends a substantive proposal, the article also defends (...)
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  27. Talking About Tools: Did Early Pleistocene Hominins Have a Protolanguage?Ronald Planer - 2017 - Biological Theory 12 (4):211-221.
    This article addresses the question of whether early Pleistocene hominins are plausibly viewed as having possessed a protolanguage, that is, a communication system exemplifying some but not all of the distinctive features of fully modern human language. I argue that the answer is “yes,” mounting evidence from the early Pleistocene “lithics niche.” More specifically, I first describe a cognitive platform that I think would have been sufficient, given appropriate socio-ecological conditions, for the creation and retention of a protolanguage. Then, using (...)
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  28. William James’s Social Evolutionism in Focus. McGranahan - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (3):80.
    It is well known that William James’s thinking was influenced by evolutionary theory and by Darwin’s theory of natural selection in particular. It is easy to misunderstand James’s evolutionary thinking, however, if one is tempted to read contemporary evolutionary views back into James. In this article I try to avoid such anachronism by carefully distinguishing James’s evolutionary views from some of their nearest conceptual neighbors. I focus in particular on James’s social evolutionism, especially as he expounds it in his 1880 (...)
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  29. Is Self-Deception an Effective Non-Cooperative Strategy?Eric Funkhouser - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (2):221-242.
    Robert Trivers has proposed perhaps the only serious adaptationist account of self-deception—that the primary function of self-deception is to better deceive others. But this account covers only a subset of cases and needs further refinement. A better evolutionary account of self-deception and cognitive biases more generally will more rigorously recognize the various ways in which false beliefs affect both the self and others. This article offers formulas for determining the optimal doxastic orientation, giving special consideration to conflicted self-deception as an (...)
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  30. On Evolutionary Theories.Leigh van Valen - 1963 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 14:146.
  31. The Evolution of the Psychical Element, by George Herbert Mead.H. Bawden & Kevin Decker - 2008 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):480-507.
    George Herbert Mead's lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding Mead's views on social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's 1898-99 lecture series, preserved through the notes of his student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductive approach to functionalist psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge and his commitments in the natural and social sciences are on display (...)
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  32. The Person of Evolution. Studies of Instinct as Contributions to a Philosophy of Evolution.D. Maurice Allan - 1931 - Journal of Philosophy 28 (13):362-363.
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  33. Evolution and the Human Mind: How Far Can We Go?1: Henry Plotkin.Henry Plotkin - 2001 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 49:267-275.
    There is a close coincidence in time between the appearance of psychology as a science and the rise of evolutionary theory. The first laboratory of experimental psychology was established in Germany by Wilhelm Wundt just as Darwin's writings were beginning to have their enormous impact, especially as they might be applied to understanding the human mind. Psychology is an important discipline because it straddles the boundary between the biological sciences and the social or human sciences of anthropology, sociology and economics. (...)
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  34. Synergy of Energy and Semiosis: Cooperation Climbs the Tree of Life.Eliseo Fernández - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (3):383-397.
    The course of biological evolution is regarded by many authors as an ascending path toward higher levels of variety, complexity and integration. There are similar but partly conflicting accounts of the nature and causes of this ascending course. With the aim of reaching a unified conception I start by summarily reviewing three notable examples. These are, in their latest presentations, those of Hoffmeyer and Stjernfelt 2015, Szathmáry 2015, and Lane 2015a. Comparison of their commonalities and divergences, combined with further reflections, (...)
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  35. Modularity, and the Psychoevolutionary Theory of Emotion.P. E. Griffiths - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (2):175.
    It is unreasonable to assume that our pre-scientific emotion vocabulary embodies all and only those distinctions required for a scientific psychology of emotion. The psychoevolutionary approach to emotion yields an alternative classification of certain emotion phenomena. The new categories are based on a set of evolved adaptive responses, or affect-programs, which are found in all cultures. The triggering of these responses involves a modular system of stimulus appraisal, whose evoluations may conflict with those of higher-level cognitive processes. Whilst the structure (...)
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  36. Cultural Transmission and Social Control of Human Behavior.Laureano Castro, Luis Castro-Nogueira, Miguel A. Castro-Nogueira & Miguel A. Toro - 2010 - Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):347-360.
    Humans have developed the capacity to approve or disapprove of the behavior of their children and of unrelated individuals. The ability to approve or disapprove transformed social learning into a system of cumulative cultural inheritance, because it increased the reliability of cultural transmission. Moreover, people can transmit their behavioral experiences (regarding what can and cannot be done) to their offspring, thereby avoiding the costs of a laborious, and sometimes dangerous, evaluation of different cultural alternatives. Our thesis is that, during ontogeny, (...)
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  37. The Theory of Mind Module in Evolutionary Psychology.Philip Gerrans - 2002 - Biology and Philosophy 17 (3):305-321.
  38. Review: The Recurring Universal and the Evolutionary Transformative. [REVIEW]Eli Sagan - 2007 - History and Theory 46 (3):458-467.
  39. Evolution and Free Will: A Defense of Darwinian Non–Naturalism.John Lemos - 2002 - Metaphilosophy 33 (4):468-482.
    In his recent book The Natural Selection of Autonomy, Bruce Waller defends a view that he calls “natural autonomy.” This view holds that human beings possess a kind of autonomy that we share with nonhuman animals, a capacity to explore alternative courses of action, but an autonomy that cannot support moral responsibility. He also argues that this natural autonomy can provide support for the ethical principle of noninterference. I argue that to support the ethical principle of noninterference Waller needs either (...)
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  40. Did Morality First Evolve in Homo Erectus?Rappaport Margaret Boone & S. J. Christopher Corbally - 2016 - Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 61:105-131.
    With findings from cognitive science, neuroscience, information science, and paleoanthropology, an anthropologist and astronomer-priest team take a new look at the nature of morality, and suggest parameters that are often very different from the philosophical and theological literatures. They see morality as a biologically-based arbitration mechanism that works along a timeline with a valence of good to bad. It is rational, purposeful, social, and affected by emotion but not dominated by it. The authors examine the age and sex structure, family (...)
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  41. On Co-Evolution.John Rensenbrink - 2016 - Dialogue and Universalism 26 (4):21-24.
    The theory and practice of co-evolution offers a way forward for humanity that goes well beyond the deterministic confines of an outmoded mechanistic science that still inhabits much academic thought and research; and also goes well beyond postdeterministic efforts to exempt the human mind and will from its presumed inexorable embeddedness in the mechanistically perceived life and motions of the body. Coevolution rejects both and goes to the root of the matter regarding nature. It decisively affirms the post-mechanistic understandings of (...)
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  42. The Recluse of Loyang - Shao Yung and the Moral Evolution of Early Sung Thought. [REVIEW]Bernard Paul Sypniewski - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):263-267.
  43. The Human World in the Physical Universe: Consciousness, Free Will, and Evolution. [REVIEW]Bernard Harrison - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):765-770.
  44. Unto Others: The Evolution and Psychology of Unselfish Behavior.Paul E. Griffiths - 2002 - Mind 111 (441):178-182.
  45. Rethinking Darwin in Light of a Culture of Communion.Miguel Oliveira Panão - 2010 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 66 (3):619-634.
    Culture influenced Charles Darwin's vision of the world and indirectly produced dramatic changes in the scientific discipline of Biology. On the other hand, with the development of Biology due to Darwin's contribution, culture changed and its religious dimension is particularly challenged. Here, drawing on the perspective of a culture of communion in the theological and philosophical thinking of Chiara Lubich, I suggest we may be led to rethink Darwin's metaphorical discourse. The implications of such culture for understanding the relation between (...)
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  46. Presentation: Darwinism and Social Science: Is There Any Hope for the Reductionist?Jesús P. Zamora Bonilla - 2003 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 18 (3):255-257.
  47. Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon. [REVIEW]Leslie Marsh - 2006 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (3-4):357-366.
    The thesis that Dennett argues for in Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon has a double aspect. First, religion being but one natural phenomenon among many should be subject to scientific investigation. Resistance to this notion constitutes the first spell or taboo and is in complicity with the second “master” spell, that of the phenomenon of religion itself. Dennett’s tentative naturalistic recommendation is two-pronged: he primarily deploys an evolutionary biology perspective, and derivatively a highly suggestive appeal to memetics. (...)
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  48. Paradigm Evolution in Political Philosophy: Aristotle and Hobbes.Manfred Riedel - 1982 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 9 (1):109-124.
  49. Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature. [REVIEW]Michael Ruse - 2003 - International Studies in Philosophy 35 (4):142-144.
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  50. Pour une approche évolutionniste de la cognition animale.Édouard Machery - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (4):731-745.
    Cet article recense et discute le récent livre de Joëlle Proust, Les animaux pensent-ils ?. Proust s'appuie sur les récents développements en psychologie animale et en éthologie pour fournir des réponses nouvelles à des questions philosophiques traditionnelles, comme « les animaux pensent-ils » ou « les animaux parlent-ils ? ». Ce livre est à recommander aussi bien aux étudiants qu'aux chercheurs confirmés. Toutefois, malgré son intérêt, je souligne une limite critique de l'approche de Proust : plusieurs arguments souffrent du fait (...)
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