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  1. Morality in Evolution.S. C. A. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (2):384-385.
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  2. Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins.Denis R. Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.) - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Over the course of human history, the sciences, and biology in particular, have often been manipulated to cause immense human suffering. For example, biology has been used to justify eugenic programs, forced sterilization, human experimentation, and death camps—all in an attempt to support notions of racial superiority. By investigating the past, the contributors to _Biology and Ideology from Descartes to Dawkins_ hope to better prepare us to discern ideological abuse of science when it occurs in the future. Denis R. Alexander (...)
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  3. Darwin and the Linguists: The Coevolution of Mind and Language, Part 1. Problematic Friends.Stephen G. Alter - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 38 (3):573-584.
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  4. The Origin of Foresight.Martin Amsteus - 2012 - World Futures 68 (6):390 - 405.
    The purpose of this article is to develop a framework for the origin of foresight. Following a review of arguments for foresight as genetically inherited versus environmentally acquired, the understanding of foresight is expanded through a behaviorist perspective and through an evolutionary perspective. The framework established makes it possible to deploy evolutionary logic to explain foresight as well as to enhance our understanding of foresight, both on individual (e.g., managerial) and aggregated (e.g., organizational) levels.
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  5. Review. Darwinism's Struggle for Survival: Heredity and the Hypothesis of Natural Selection. J Gayon.R. Amundsom - 1999 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 50 (4):761-767.
  6. Recycling Nonlinear Evolutionary Living Into Linear Developmental Lives.Myrdene Anderson & Devika Chawla - 2008 - Semiotics:156-162.
  7. Natural Selection Doesn't Work That Way: Fodor on Adaptationism.A. Ariew - 2003 - Mind and Language 18 (5):447-477.
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  8. The Environments of Our Hominin Ancestors, Tool-Usage, and Scenario Visualization.R. Arp - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):95-117.
    In this paper, I give an account of how our hominin ancestors evolved a conscious ability I call scenario visualization that enabled them to manufacture novel tools so as to survive and flourish in the ever-changing and complex environments in which they lived. I first present the ideas and arguments put forward by evolutionary psychologists that the mind evolved certain mental capacities as adaptive responses to environmental pressures. Specifically, Steven Mithen thinks that the mind has evolved cognitive fluidity, viz., an (...)
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  9. Co-Evolving: Judaism and Biology.Bradley Shavit Artson - 2011 - Zygon 46 (2):429-445.
    Abstract. Biology has been able to systematize and order its vast information through the theory of evolution, offering the possibility of a more engaged dialogue and possible integration with religious insights and emotions. Using Judaism as a focus, this essay examines ways that contemporary evolutionary theory offers room for balancing freedom and constraint, serendipity and intentionality in ways fruitful to Jewish thought and expression. This essay then looks at a productive integration of Judaism and biology in the examples of co-evolution, (...)
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  10. Creation and Evolution.Robin Attfield - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:41-47.
    It is not inconsistent to believe in both creation and in Darwinian evolution at the same time as rejecting creationism, and endorsing a realist stance about religious and scientific language. Belief in creation is argued to be every bit as defensible as Darwinism, and reconcilable with phenomena such as predation. If (as Richard Dawkins holds) evolution is the only possible pathway to life as we know it, then a life-loving creator would select this pathway. If it is not the only (...)
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  11. Adaptation and Information in Ontogenesis and Phylogenesis. Increase of Complexity and Efficiency.Giovanni Felice Azzone - 1997 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 19 (2):163-180.
    Adaptations during phylogenesis or ontogenesis can occur either by maintaning constant or by increasing the informational content of the organism. In the former case the increasing adaptations to external perturbation are achieved by increasing the rate of genome replication; the increased amount of DNA reflects an increase of total but not of law informational content. In the latter case the adaptations are achieved by either istructionist or evolutionary mechanism or a combination of both. Evolutionary adaptations occur during ontogenesis mainly in (...)
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  12. The Handicap Principle and the Argument of Subversion From Within.Christian Baron - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (3):347-355.
    This paper examines the very disparate positions that various actors have taken towards the argument of subversion from within in a set of related debates on group selection, altruism and the handicap principle. Using this set of debates as a case study, this paper argues that different applications of epistemic values were one of the factors behind the disagreements between John Maynard Smith and Amotz Zahavi over a number of important evolutionary issues. The paper also argues that these different applications (...)
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  13. Endosymbiotic Origins of Sex.Christopher Bazinet - 2004 - Bioessays 26 (5):558-566.
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  14. The Structure of Biological Science.John Beatty - 1990 - Biology and Philosophy 5 (2).
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  15. Adaptation, Science de la Durabilité Et Pensée Planificatrice.Vincent Berdoulay & Olivier Soubeyran - 2014 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 22 (2):114-123.
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  16. L'évolution Créatrice.Henri Bergson - 1908 - Philosophical Review 17 (1):84-89.
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  17. Phonological Change in Optimality Theory.Ricardo Bermúdez-Otero - 2006 - In Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. pp. 9--497.
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  18. Redox Control and the Evolution of Multicellularity.Neil W. Blackstone - 2000 - Bioessays 22 (10):947-953.
  19. The Adaptation Theory of Science.Richard J. Blackwell - 1973 - International Philosophical Quarterly 13 (3):319-334.
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  20. Mating Games: Cultural Evolution and Sexual Selection.A. Block & S. Dewitte - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):475-491.
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  21. What Is a Symbiotic Superindividual and How Do You Measure Its Fitness?Frédéric Bouchard - 2013 - In Philippe Huneman & Frédéric Bouchard (eds.), From Groups to Individuals. Evolution and Emerging Individuality. MIT Press. pp. 243.
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  22. Darwinism Without Populations: A More Inclusive Understanding of the “Survival of the Fittest”.Frédéric Bouchard - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):106-114.
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  23. Fitness.Frédéric Bouchard - 2006 - In J. Pfeifer & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), The Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia. Psychology Press. pp. 310--315.
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  24. The Eclipse of Pseudo-Darwinism? Reflections on Some Recent Developments in Darwin Studies.Peter J. Bowler - 2009 - History of Science 47 (4):431-443.
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  25. Darwin and Darwinism.Borden P. Bowne - 1909 - Hibbert Journal 8:122.
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  26. A Non-Newtonian Newtonian Model of Evolution: The ZFEL View.Robert N. Brandon - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (5):702-715.
  27. A Structural Description of Evolutionary Theory.Robert N. Brandon - 1980 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:427 - 439.
    The principle of natural selection is stated. It connects fitness values (actual reproductive success) with expected fitness values. The term 'adaptedness' is used for expected fitness values. The principle of natural selection explains differential fitness in terms of relative adaptedness. It is argued that this principle is absolutely central to Darwinian evolutionary theory. The empirical content of the principle of natural selection is examined. It is argued that the principle itself has no empirical biological content, but that the presuppositions of (...)
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  28. The Propensity Interpretation of 'Fitness'--No Interpretation is No Substitute.Robert Brandon & John Beatty - 1984 - Philosophy of Science 51 (2):342-347.
  29. Turtles Are Not Just Walking Stones: Conspicuous Coloration and Sexual Selection in Freshwater Turtles.Jindřich Brejcha & Karel Kleisner - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (2):247-266.
    Turtles are among the most intriguing amniotes but their communication and signaling have rarely been studied. Traditionally, they have been seen as basically just silent armored ‘walking stones’ with complex physiology but no altruism, maternal care, or aesthetic perception. Recently, however, we have witnessed a radical change in the perception of turtle behavioral and cognitive skills. In our study, we start by reviewing some recent findings pertaining to various highly developed behavioral and cognitive patterns with special emphasis on turtles. Then (...)
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  30. Evolution Beyond Determinism - on Dennett's Compatibilism and the Too Timeless Free Will Debate.Maria Brincker - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics 3 (1):39-74.
    Most of the free will debate operates under the assumption that classic determinism and indeterminism are the only metaphysical options available. Through an analysis of Dennett’s view of free will as gradually evolving this article attempts to point to emergentist, interactivist and temporal metaphysical options, which have been left largely unexplored by contemporary theorists. Whereas, Dennett himself holds that “the kind of free will worth wanting” is compatible with classic determinism, I propose that his models of determinism fit poorly with (...)
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  31. En Kropslig Kultur Historie - om omverdens relationen".Maria Brincker - 2012 - In E. O. Pedersen & A.-M. S. Christensen (eds.), Mennesket - En Introduktion Til Filosofisk Antropologi. Systime. pp. 197-216.
    This chapter deals with the way our psychology and actions a scaffolded by their environment but also the tensions that can appear between individual and environment, both at the level of biology and culture. The chapter is grounded in an analysis of the early 20th century theoretical biologist Jacob von Uexkull and his notion of "Umwelt" or "surround world". But also raises the question of whether organisms fit their environment as neatly as Uexkull and many later thinkers have proposed or (...)
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  32. The Mastodon in the Room: How Darwinian is Neo-Darwinism?Daniel R. Brooks - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 42 (1):82-88.
    Failing to acknowledge substantial differences between Darwinism and neo-Darwinism impedes evolutionary biology. Darwin described evolution as the outcome of interactions between the nature of the organism and the nature of the conditions, each relatively autonomous but both historically and spatially intertwined. Furthermore, he postulated that the nature of the organism was more important than the nature of the conditions, leading to natural selection as an inevitable emergent product of biological systems. The neo-Darwinian tradition assumed a creative rather than selective view (...)
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  33. Cost, Expenditure and Vulnerability.P. Bruner Justin, Brusse Carl & Kalkman David - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (3):357-375.
    The handicap principle stipulates that signal reliability can be maintained if signals are costly to produce. Yet empirical biologists are typically unable to directly measure evolutionary costs, and instead appeal to expenditure as a sensible proxy. However the link between expenditure and cost is not always as straightforward as proponents of HP assume. We consider signaling interactions where whether the expenditure associated with signaling is converted into an evolutionary cost is in some sense dependent on the behavior of the intended (...)
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  34. Did the Notochord Evolve From an Ancient Axial Muscle? The Axochord Hypothesis.Thibaut Brunet, Antonella Lauri & Detlev Arendt - 2015 - Bioessays 37 (8):836-850.
  35. Anti-Darwin, Anti-Spencer: Friedrich Nietzsche's Critique Of Darwin And "Darwinism".Lewis Call - 1998 - History of Science 36 (1):1-22.
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  36. John Durant, Ed.: "Darwinism and Divinity". [REVIEW]F. F. Centore - 1988 - The Thomist 52 (2):357.
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  37. The Survival of the Fittest.P. D. Chapman - 1967 - The Eugenics Review 59 (4):299.
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  38. Analyzing and Comparing the Geometry of Individual Fitness Surfaces.S. F. Chenoweth, J. Hunt & H. D. Rundle - 2012 - In E. Svensson & R. Calsbeek (eds.), The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology. Oxford University Press. pp. 126--149.
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  39. Analyzing and Comparing the Geometry of Individual Fitness.Stephen F. Chenoweth, John Hunt & Howard D. Rundle - 2012 - In E. Svensson & R. Calsbeek (eds.), The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology. Oxford University Press. pp. 126.
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  40. Adaptiveness and Adaptation: There's More Than Selection.W. D. Christensen, John Collier & C. A. Hooker - forthcoming - Biology and Philosophy. Submitted.
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  41. Information Increase in Biological Systems: How Does Adaptation Fit?John Collier - unknown
    Progress has become a suspect concept in evolutionary biology, not the least because the core concepts of neo-Darwinism do not support the idea that evolution is progressive. There have been a number of attempts to account for directionality in evolution through additions to the core hypotheses of neo-Darwinism, but they do not establish progressiveness, and they are somewhat of an ad hoc collection. The standard account of fitness and adaptation can be rephrased in terms of information theory. From this, an (...)
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  42. Crusaders for Fitness: The History of American Health Reformers. [REVIEW]Roger Cooter - 1984 - British Journal for the History of Science 17 (1):92-93.
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  43. The Effects of Nematode Infection and Mi-Mediated Resistance in Tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum) on Plant Fitness.Brandon P. Corbett - 2007 - Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal 8.
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  44. Conference on Evolution and the Human Sciences.Leda Cosmides, Martin Daly, Richard Dawkins, Daniel Dennett, W. D. Hamilton, Philip Kitcher, John Maynard Smith, Steven Pinker, Elliott Sober & Dan Sperber - 1992 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):699-700.
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  45. Ancestral Assumptions and the Clinical Uncertainty of Evolutionary Medicine.Michael Cournoyea - 2013 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (1):36-52.
    Evolutionary medicine (EM) is an emerging field of medical studies that uses evolutionary theory to explain the ultimate causes of health and disease. The field’s main objective is to reconceptualize bodily vulnerabilities and pathophysiologies as evolutionary tradeoffs—many the result of an evolutionary mismatch between our ancient genome and modern lifestyle. This conceptual shift allows EM to describe health and disease in terms of adaptive functions and to prescribe treatments that best complement our evolved bodies. The goal is to “transform the (...)
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  46. Gerd B. Müller and Massimo Pigliucci—Extended Synthesis: Theory Expansion or Alternative?Lindsay R. Craig - 2010 - Biological Theory 5 (4):395-396.
  47. Uenther's Darwinism and the Problems of Life. [REVIEW]Henry Edward Crampton - 1907 - Journal of Philosophy 4 (11):297.
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  48. The Role of Intuitive Ontologies in Scientific Understanding – the Case of Human Evolution.Helen Cruz & Johan Smedt - 2007 - Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):351-368.
  49. Commentary on the Paper by H.C. Byerly and R.E. Michod, “Fitness and Evolutionary Explanation”.A. Brito Cunhdaa - 1991 - Biology and Philosophy 6 (1).
  50. Darwin and Darwinism.Richard Dawkins - unknown
    To most people through history it has always seemed obvious that the teeming diversity of life, the uncanny perfection with which living organisms are equipped to survive and multiply, and the bewildering complexity of living machinery, can only have come about through divine creation. Yet repeatedly it has occurred to isolated thinkers that there might be an alternative to supernatural creation.
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