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  1. Gould, Hull, and the Individuation of Scientific Theories.Paulo Abrantes & Charbel Niño El-Hani - 2009 - Foundations of Science 14 (4):295-313.
    When is conceptual change so significant that we should talk about a new theory, not a new version of the same theory? We address this problem here, starting from Gould’s discussion of the individuation of the Darwinian theory. He locates his position between two extremes: ‘minimalist’—a theory should be individuated merely by its insertion in a historical lineage—and ‘maximalist’—exhaustive lists of necessary and sufficient conditions are required for individuation. He imputes the minimalist position to Hull and attempts a reductio : (...)
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  2. Objective Knowledge: An Evolutionary Approach.Joseph Agassi - 1974 - Philosophia 4 (1):163-201.
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  3. Popper's Evolutionary Epistemology Revamped.F. Michael Akeroyd - 2004 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 35 (2):385 - 396.
    In a paper entitled “Revolution in Permanence”, published in the collection “Karl Popper: Philosophy and Problems”, John Worrall (1995) severely criticised several aspects of Karl Popper’s work before commenting that “I have no doubt that, given suffi-cient motivation, a case could be constructed on the basis of such remarks that Popper had a more sophisticated version of theory production......” (p. 102). Part of Worrall’s criticism is directed at a “strawpopper”: in his “Darwinian Model” emphasising the similarities and differences between genetic (...)
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  4. Popper's Evolutionary Epistemology Revamped.F. Michael Akeroyd - 2004 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 35 (2):385-396.
    In a paper entitled "Revolution in Permanence", published in the collection "Karl Popper: Philosophy and Problems", John Worrall severely criticised several aspects of Karl Popper's work before commenting that "I have no doubt that, given sufficient motivation, a case could be constructed on the basis of such remarks that Popper had a more sophisticated version of theory production......". Part of Worrall's criticism is directed at a "strawpopper": in his "Darwinian Model" emphasising the similarities and differences between genetic mutation, variation in (...)
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  5. Knowledge and Adaptation.Barry Allen - 1997 - Biology and Philosophy 12 (2):233-241.
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  6. Science as a Process: An Evolutionary Account of the Social and Conceptual Development of ScienceDavid L. HullThe Metaphysics of EvolutionDavid L. Hull.Garland E. Allen - 1991 - Isis 82 (4):698-704.
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  7. Sophisticated Selectionism as a General Theory of Knowledge.Claes Andersson - 2008 - Biology and Philosophy 23 (2):229-242.
    Human knowledge is a phenomenon whose roots extend from the cultural, through the neural and the biological and finally all the way down into the Precambrian “primordial soup.” The present paper reports an attempt at understanding this Greater System of Knowledge (GSK) as a hierarchical nested set of selection processes acting concurrently on several different scales of time and space. To this end, a general selection theory extending mainly from the work of Hull and Campbell is introduced. The perhaps most (...)
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  8. "Monsters on the Brain: An Evolutionary Epistemology of Horror".Stephen Asma - 2014 - Social Research: An International Quarterly (N.4).
    The article discusses the evolutionary development of horror and fear in animals and humans, including in regard to cognition and physiological aspects of the brain. An overview of the social aspects of emotions, including the role that emotions play in interpersonal relations and the role that empathy plays in humans' ethics, is provided. An overview of the psychological aspects of monsters, including humans' simultaneous repulsion and interest in horror films that depict monsters, is also provided.
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  9. The Biological Roots of Knowledge.Oleg E. Backsansky - 2008 - Dialogue and Universalism 18 (11):227-231.
    An inspection into the contemporary theory of knowledge shows that a new methodological stance, that is, the so called evolutionary epistemology or, equivalently, evolutionary theory of knowledge, which is a version of “naturalistic” turn has been established. This stance tends to consider various philosophical problems from concrete scientific positions and by means of scientific knowledge. This interdisciplinary enterprise has determined as its purposes the researches of biological preconditions of human knowledge and the explanation of its features on the basis of (...)
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  10. Why Evolutionary Epistemology is an Endangered Theory.Brian Baigrie - 1988 - Social Epistemology 2 (4):357 – 369.
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  11. Book Review:Science as a Process David L. Hull. [REVIEW]William Bechtel - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (1):138-.
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  12. New Insights Into the Nature of Science: What Does Hull's Evolutionary Epistemology Teach Us? [REVIEW]William Bechtel - 1988 - Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):157-164.
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  13. Elimination, Correction and Popper's Evolutionary Epistemology.James Blachowicz - 1995 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (1):5 – 17.
    Abstract Evolutionary epistemologists from Popper to Campbell have appropriated the Darwinian principle to explain the apparent fit between the world and our knowledge of it. I argue that this strategy suffers from the lack of any principled distinction among various types of elimination. I offer such a distinction and show that there is a species of elimination that is really corrective, that is, which violates the Darwinian principle as Popper understands it.
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  14. Scepticism, Relativism, and the Structure of Epistemic Frameworks.Steven Bland - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (4):539-544.
    This paper has four aims: first, to outline the role of the sceptical problem of the criterion in the principal argument for epistemic relativism; second, to establish that methodist and particularist responses to the problem of the criterion do not, by themselves, constitute successful strategies for resisting epistemic relativism; third, to argue that a more fruitful strategy is to attempt to evaluate epistemic frameworks on the basis of the epistemic resources that they have in common; and finally, to make the (...)
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  15. Evolutionary Epistemology.Margaret A. Boden - 1990 - Synthese 85:185-197.
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  16. Only All Naturalists Should Worry About Only One Evolutionary Debunking Argument.Tomas Bogardus - 2016 - Ethics 126 (3):636-661.
    Do the facts of evolution generate an epistemic challenge to moral realism? Some think so, and many “evolutionary debunking arguments” have been discussed in the recent literature. But they are all murky right where it counts most: exactly which epistemic principle is meant to take us from evolutionary considerations to the skeptical conclusion? Here, I will identify several distinct species of evolutionary debunking argument in the literature, each one of which relies on a distinct epistemic principle. Drawing on recent work (...)
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  17. History and Philosophy of Science: An Introduction. L. W. H. Hull.Carl B. Boyer - 1960 - Isis 51 (3):347-348.
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  18. Evolutionary Epistemology.Michael Bradie - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  19. An Information-Theoretic Approach to Evolutionary Epistemology. [REVIEW]Michael Bradie - 2006 - Biological Theory 1 (4):431-433.
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  20. Epistemology From an Evolutionary Point of View.Michael Bradie - 1994 - In E. Sober (ed.), Conceptual Issues in Evolutionary Biology. The Mit Press. Bradford Books. pp. 453--476.
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  21. Assessing Evolutionary Epistemology.Michael Bradie - 1986 - Biology and Philosophy 1 (4):401-459.
    There are two interrelated but distinct programs which go by the name evolutionary epistemology. One attempts to account for the characteristics of cognitive mechanisms in animals and humans by a straightforward extension of the biological theory of evolution to those aspects or traits of animals which are the biological substrates of cognitive activity, e.g., their brains, sensory systems, motor systems, etc. (EEM program). The other program attempts to account for the evaluation of ideas, scientific theories and culture in general by (...)
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  22. Review: Toulmin's Evolutionary Epistemology. [REVIEW]Larry Briskman - 1974 - Philosophical Quarterly 24 (95):160 - 169.
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  23. Rescher's Evolutionary Epistemology.James Robert Brown - 1985 - Philosophia 15 (3):287-300.
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  24. A Correction to "A Criticism of Hull's Goal Gradient Hypothesis.".J. Buel - 1939 - Psychological Review 46 (1):86-87.
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  25. A Criticism of Hull's Goal Gradient Hypothesis.J. Buel - 1938 - Psychological Review 45 (5):395-413.
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  26. Evolutionary Epistemology: A Clue to Understand Moral Origins. [REVIEW]Lucrecia Burges - 2002 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (1):109 - 120.
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  27. Essay Review: Evolutionary Epistemology: A Clue to Understand Moral Origins.Lucrecia Burges - 2002 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (1):109-120.
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  28. Erkenntnis als Ergebnis biologischer Entwicklung: Die Grundzüge der Evolutionären Erkenntnistheorie im Überblick.Wolfgang Buschlinger & Hannes Rusch - 2014 - Ethik Und Unterricht 2014 (2):10-14.
    In diesem Artikel stellen wir die Evolutionäre Erkenntnistheorie kurz vor. Wir gehen dazu in zwei Schritten vor: In Schritt 1 charakterisieren wir die Evolutionäre Erkenntnistheorie anhand ihrer Antworten auf die Grundfragen an jede Erkenntnistheorie. In Schritt 2 stellen wir all jene philosophischen Positionen dar, mit denen die Evolutionäre Erkenntnistheorie eng verbunden ist.
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  29. Kuhn's Evolutionary Social Epistemology. [REVIEW]Michael Bycroft - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (3):425-429.
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  30. Practical Rationality From an Evolutionary Perspective.Werner Callebaut - 1978 - Philosophica 22.
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  31. Evolutionary Epistemology: A Multiparadigm Program.Werner Callebaut & R. Pinxten (eds.) - 1987 - Reidel.
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  32. The Evolution of Self-Knowledge.Peter Carruthers, Logan Fletcher & J. Brendan Ritchie - 2012 - Philosophical Topics 40 (2):13-37.
    Humans have the capacity for awareness of many aspects of their own mental lives—their own experiences, feelings, judgments, desires, and decisions. We can often know what it is that we see, hear, feel, judge, want, or decide. This article examines the evolutionary origins of this form of self-knowledge. Two alternatives are contrasted and compared with the available evidence. One is first-person based: self-knowledge is an adaptation designed initially for metacognitive monitoring and control. The other is third-person based: self-knowledge depends on (...)
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  33. Rethinking Knowledge.Carlo Cellucci - 2015 - Metaphilosophy 46 (2):213-234.
    The view that the subject matter of epistemology is the concept of knowledge is faced with the problem that all attempts so far to define that concept are subject to counterexamples. As an alternative, this article argues that the subject matter of epistemology is knowledge itself rather than the concept of knowledge. Moreover, knowledge is not merely a state of mind but rather a certain kind of response to the environment that is essential for survival. In this perspective, the article (...)
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  34. Constraints and Possibilities the Evolution of Knowledge and Knowledge of Evolution.Mauro Ceruti & Alfonso Montuori - 1994
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  35. OPPER, K. R.: "Objective Knowledge: An Evolutionary Approach". [REVIEW]A. F. Chalmers - 1974 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 52:70.
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  36. The Normative Demand in Evolutionary Epistemology.Paola Hernández Chavez - 2003 - Ludus Vitalis 9 (20):108-115.
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  37. Innateness and Brain-Wiring Optimization.Christopher Cherniak - 2005 - In António Zilhão (ed.), Evolution, Rationality, and Cognition: A Cognitive Science for the Twenty-First Century. Routledge.
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  38. The Prolegomens to Theory of Human Stable Evolutionarciety at Age of Controlled Evolution Techny Strategy as Ideology of Risk Soologies.V. T. Cheshko - 2016 - In Teodor N. Țîrdea (ed.), // Strategia supravietuirii din perspectiva bioeticii, filosofiei și medicinei. Culegere de articole științifice. Vol. 22–. pp. 134-139.
    Stable adaptive strategy of Homo sapiens (SESH) is a superposition of three different adaptive data arrays: biological, socio-cultural and technological modules, based on three independent processes of generation and replication of an adaptive information – genetic, socio-cultural and symbolic transmissions (inheritance). Third component SESH focused equally to the adaptive transformation of the environment and carrier of SESH. With the advent of High Hume technology, risk has reached the existential significance level. The existential level of technical risk is, by definition, an (...)
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  39. EVOLUTIONARY RISK OF HIGH HUME TECHNOLOGIES. Article 3. EVOLUTIONARY SEMANTICS AND BIOETHICS.V. T. Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko - 2016 - Integrative Annthropology (1):21-27.
    The co-evolutionary concept of three-modal stable evolutionary strategy of Homo sapiens is developed. The concept based on the principle of evolutionary complementarity of anthropogenesis: value of evolutionary risk and evolutionary path of human evolution are defined by descriptive (evolutionary efficiency) and creative-teleological (evolutionary correctness) parameters simultaneously, that cannot be instrumental reduced to other ones. Resulting volume of both parameters define the vectors of biological, social, cultural and techno-rationalistic human evolution by two gear mechanism — genetic and cultural co-evolution and techno-humanitarian (...)
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  40. EVOLUTIONARY RISK OF HIGH HUME TECHNOLOGIES. Article 2. THE GENESIS AND MECHANISMS OF EVOLUTIONARY RISK.V. T. Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko - 2015 - Integrative Anthropology (1):4-15.
    Sources of evolutionary risk for stable strategy of adaptive Homo sapiens are an imbalance of: (1) the intra-genomic co-evolution (intragenomic conflicts); (2) the gene-cultural co-evolution; (3) inter-cultural co-evolution; (4) techno-humanitarian balance; (5) inter-technological conflicts (technological traps). At least phenomenologically the components of the evolutionary risk are reversible, but in the aggregate they are in potentio irreversible destructive ones for biosocial, and cultural self-identity of Homo sapiens. When the actual evolution is the subject of a rationalist control and/or manipulation, the magnitude (...)
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  41. EVOLUTIONARY RISK OF HIGH HUME TECHNOLOGIES. Article 1. STABLE ADAPTIVE STRATEGY OF HOMO SAPIENS.V. T. Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko - 2014 - Integrative Anthropology (2):4-14.
    Stable adaptive strategy of Homo sapiens (SASH) is a result of the integration in the three-module fractal adaptations based on three independent processes of generation, replication, and the implementation of adaptations — genetic, socio-cultural and symbolic ones. The evolutionary landscape SASH is a topos of several evolutionary multi-dimensional vectors: 1) extraversional projective-activity behavioral intention (adaptive inversion 1), 2) mimesis (socio-cultural inheritance), 3) social (Machiavellian) intelligence, 4) the extension of inter-individual communication beyond their own social groups and their own species in (...)
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  42. COEVOLUTIONARY SEMANTICS OF TECHNOLOGICAL CIVILIZATION GENESIS AND EVOLUTIONARY RISK (BETWEEN THE BIOAESTHETICS AND BIOPOLITICS).V. T. Cheshko & O. N. Kuz - 2016 - Anthropological Dimensions of Philosophical Studies (10):43-55.
    Purpose (metatask) of the present work is to attempt to give a glance at the problem of existential and anthropo- logical risk caused by the contemporary man-made civilization from the perspective of comparison and confronta- tion of aesthetics, the substrate of which is emotional and metaphorical interpretation of individual subjective values and politics feeding by objectively rational interests of social groups. In both cases there is some semantic gap pre- sent between the represented social reality and its representation in perception (...)
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  43. Configuration of Stable Evolutionary Strategy of Homo Sapiens and Evolutionary Risks of Technological Civilization (the Conceptual Model Essay).Valentin T. Cheshko, Lida V. Ivanitskaya & Yulia V. Kosova - 2014 - Biogeosystem Technique 1 (1):58-68.
    Stable evolutionary strategy of Homo sapiens (SESH) is built in accordance with the modular and hierarchical principle and consists of the same type of self-replicating elements, i.e. is a system of systems. On the top level of the organization of SESH is the superposition of genetic, social, cultural and techno-rationalistic complexes. The components of this triad differ in the mechanism of cycles of generation - replication - transmission - fixing/elimination of adoptively relevant information. This mechanism is implemented either in accordance (...)
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  44. POST-INDUSTRIAL SCIENCE OF XXI CENTURY – RATIONALISM VERSUS IRRATIONALISM: EVOLUTIONARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL ASPECT.Valentin Cheshko, L. V. Ivanitskaya & V. I. Glazko - 2011 - Russian Academy of Natural Sciences Herald 3:68-77.
    The phenomenon of rationalism and irrationalism, contextually related to the transformation methodology and the social function of modern (post-industrial) science – social verification, interpretation and knowledge, etc., are analyzes.
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  45. SOCIAL VERIFICATION – HUMAN DIMENSONS OF THEORETICAL SCIENCE AND HIGH-TECH (CASUS BIOETHICS). Part Three. DYNAMICS OF GROWTH OF NEW KNOWLEDGE IN POSTACADEMICAL SCIENCE.Valentin Cheshko & Yulia Kosova - 2012 - Practical Philosophy 1:59-69.
    The new phase of science evolution is characterized by totality of subject and object of cognition and technology (high-hume). As a result, forming of network structure in a disciplinary matrix modern are «human dimensional» natural sciences and two paradigmal «nuclei» (attraktors). As a result, the complication of structure of disciplinary matrix and forming a few paradigm nuclei in modern «human dimensional» natural sciences are observed. In the process of social verification integration of scientific theories into the existent system of mental (...)
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  46. SOCIAL VERIFICATION – HUMAN DIMENSONS OF THEORETICAL SCIENCE AND HIGH-TECH (CASUS BIOETHICS). Part One.Valentin Cheshko & Yulia Kosova - 2011 - Practical Philosophy 1:94-100.
    The new phase of science evolution is characterized by totality of subject and object of cognition and technology (high-hume). As a result, forming of network structure in a disciplinary matrix modern are «human dimensional» natural sciences and two paradigmal «nuclei» (attraktors). As a result, the complication of structure of disciplinary matrix and forming a few paradigm nuclei in modern «human dimensional» natural sciences are observed. In the process of social verification integration of scientific theories into the existent system of mental (...)
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  47. SOCIAL VERIFICATION – HUMAN DIMENSONS OF THEORETICAL SCIENCE AND HIGH-TECH (CASUS BIOETHICS). Part Two.Valentin Cheshko & Yulia Kosova - 2011 - Practical Philosophy 2:46-55.
    The new phase of science evolution is characterized by totality of subject and object of cognition and technology (high-hume). As a result, forming of network structure in a disciplinary matrix modern are «human dimensional» natural sciences and two paradigmal «nuclei» (attraktors). As a result, the complication of structure of disciplinary matrix and forming a few paradigm nuclei in modern «human dimensional» natural sciences are observed.
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  48. Connectionist Synthetic Epistemology: Requirements for the Development of Objectivity.Ron Chrisley & Andy Holland - unknown
    A connectionist system that is capable of learning about the spatial structure of a simple world is used for the purposes of synthetic epistemology: the creation and analysis of artificial systems in order to clarify philosophical issues that arise in the explanation of how agents, both natural and artificial, represent the world. In this case, the issues to be clarified focus on the content of representational states that exist prior to a fully objective understanding of a spatial domain. In particular, (...)
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  49. The Organization of Knowledge: Beyond Campbell's Evolutionary Epistemology.Wayne D. Christensen & Clifford A. Hooker - 1999 - Philosophy of Science 66 (3):249.
    Donald Campbell has long advocated a naturalist epistemology based on a general selection theory, with the scope of knowledge restricted to vicarious adaptive processes. But being a vicariant is problematic because it involves an unexplained epistemic relation. We argue that this relation is to be explicated organizationally in terms of the regulation of behavior and internal state by the vicariant, but that Campbell's selectionist approach can give no satisfactory account of it because it is opaque to organization. We show how (...)
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  50. Evolutionary Epistomology and the Scientific Method.A. J. Clark - 1986 - Philosophica 37.
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