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  1. Experimental Economics: Science or What? (Pdf 293k).Ken Binmore - manuscript
    Where should experimental economics go next? This paper uses the literature on inequity aversion as a case study in suggesting that we could profit from tightening up our act.
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  2. Hayek and Experimental Economics.Vernon Smith - manuscript
  3. Too Close for Comfort and/or Validity.T. Galguera - forthcoming - Ethics.
  4. No Harm Done? An Experimental Approach to the Non-Identity Problem.Matthew Kopec & Justin P. Bruner - forthcoming - Journal of the American Philosophical Association.
    Discussions of the non-identity problem presuppose a widely shared intuition that actions or policies that change who comes into existence don't, thereby, become morally unproblematic. We hypothesize that this intuition isn’t generally shared by the public, which could have widespread implications concerning how to generate support for large-scale, identity-affecting policies relating to matters like climate change. To test this, we ran a version of the well-known dictator game designed to mimic the public's behavior over identity-affecting choices. We found the public (...)
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  5. Reciprocity and its Role in Economic Cooperation.Pedro McDade - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Warwick
  6. Two Strands of Field Experiments in Economics: A Historical-Methodological Analysis.Michiru Nagatsu & Judith Favereau - 2020 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 50 (1):45-77.
    While the history and methodology of laboratory experiments in economics have been extensively studied by philosophers, those of field experiments have not attracted much attention until recently. What is the historical context in which field experiments have been advocated? And what are the methodological rationales for conducting experiments in the field as opposed to in the lab? This article addresses these questions by combining historical and methodological perspectives. In terms of history, we show that the movement toward field experiments in (...)
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  7. Blockchain Technology in the Fiscal Process of Ukraine/I. Britchenko, T. Cherniavska//Списание «Икономически Изследвания (Economic Studies)». – Институт За Икономически Изследвания При БАН, София (България). – Volume 28, Issue 5 – 2019. – P. 134-148. ISSN 02053292.Igor Britchenko & Cherniavska Tetiana - 2019 - Списание «Икономически Изследвания (Economic Studies)» 28 (5):134-148.
    The problem of corruption in Ukraine has been examined, as well as Blockchain technology application feasibility in combating the phenomenon has been analyzed in the article. Blockchain instrumental features and properties, making the technology unique and determining its potential applications in many sectors of the economy, have been covered with much attention. The authors have analyzed both advantages and obstacles for a distributed data registry implementation. Analysis of benchmarks and application of the best practices of Blockchain technology in the public (...)
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  8. Introduction to Symposium.Magdalena Małecka & Michiru Nagatsu - 2019 - Journal of Economic Methodology 26 (3):177-178.
  9. Game Theory and the Self-Fulfilling Climate Tragedy.Matthew Kopec - 2017 - Environmental Values 26 (2):203-221.
    Game theorists tend to model climate negotiations as a so-called ‘tragedy of the commons’. This is rather worrisome, since the conditions under which such commons problems have historically been solved are almost entirely absent in the case of international greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, I will argue that the predictive accuracy of the tragedy model might not stem from the model’s inherent match with reality but rather from the model’s ability to make self-fulfilling predictions. I then sketch some possible (...)
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  10. Constitutive Explanations in Neuroeconomics: Principles and a Case Study on Money.Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2016 - Journal of Economic Methodology 23 (4):374-395.
    So far, the methodological debate about neuroeconomics rarely refers to original methodological positions in the neurosciences. I confront one of the most influential ones, the constitutive explanations or mechanism approach, with methodological claims that directly relate the economic model of choice with neuronal embodiments, represented by Glimcher’s influential work. Constitutive explanations are composite and non-reductionist, therefore allow for recognizing complex causal interactions between basal neuronal phenomena and cognitive structures, also involving external symbolic media. I demonstrate the power of this methodology (...)
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  11. Artificiality, Reactivity, and Demand Effects in Experimental Economics.Maria Jimenez-Buedo & Francesco Guala - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (1):3-23.
    A series of recent debates in experimental economics have associated demand effects with the artificiality of the experimental setting and have linked it to the problem of external validity. In this paper, we argue that these associations can be misleading, partly because of the ambiguity with which “artificiality” has been defined, but also because demand effects and external validity are related in complex ways. We argue that artificiality may be directly as well as inversely correlated with demand effects. We also (...)
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  12. Experimental Economics' Inconsistent Ban on Deception.Gil Hersch - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 52:13-19.
    According to what I call the ‘argument from public bads’, if a researcher deceived subjects in the past, there is a chance that subjects will discount the information that a subsequent researcher provides, thus compromising the validity of the subsequent researcher’s experiment. While this argument is taken to justify an existing informal ban on explicit deception in experimental economics, it can also apply to implicit deception, yet implicit deception is not banned and is sometimes used in experimental economics. Thus, experimental (...)
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  13. External Validity: Is There Still a Problem?Alexandre Marcellesi - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (5):1308-1317.
    I first propose to distinguish between two kinds of external validity inferences, predictive and explanatory. I then argue that we have a satisfactory answer to the question of the conditions under which predictive external validity inferences are good. If this claim is correct, then it has two immediate consequences: First, some external validity inferences are deductive, contrary to what is commonly assumed. Second, Steel’s requirement that an account of external validity inference break what he calls the ‘Extrapolator’s Circle’ is misplaced, (...)
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  14. Internal and External.Charles R. Beitz - 2014 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):225-238.
    James's Fairness in Trade seeks to offer an account of fair trade that is “internal” to an existing practice he describes as “mutual market reliance.” This paper distinguishes several senses of the distinction between “internal” and “external” that occur in the book and asks how, in its various senses, the distinction shapes and influences judgments about the fairness of the practice.
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  15. Neuroeconomics and Confirmation Theory.Christopher Clarke - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (2):195-215.
    Neuroeconomics is a research programme founded on the thesis that cognitive and neurobiological data constitute evidence for answering economic questions. I employ confirmation theory in order to reject arguments both for and against neuroeconomics. I also emphasize that some arguments for neuroeconomics will not convince the skeptics because these arguments make a contentious assumption: economics aims for predictions and deep explanations of choices in general. I then argue for neuroeconomics by appealing to a much more restrictive (and thereby skeptic-friendly) characterization (...)
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  16. Checklists for External Validity: A Systematic Review.Anne-Kirstine Dyrvig, Kristian Kidholm, Oke Gerke & Hindrik Vondeling - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):857-864.
  17. The Role of Experiments in Economics: Reply to Jones.Francesco Guala - 2014 - Economics and Philosophy 30 (3):503-511.
    Martin Jones has criticized my account of the methodology of experimental economics on three points: the impossibility of testing external validity claims in the laboratory, my reconstruction of external validity inferences as analogical arguments, and the distinction between laboratory and non-laboratory sciences. I defend my account here and try to eliminate some misunderstandings that may have prompted Jones’s criticism.
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  18. A Non-Monotonic Intensional Framework for Framing Effects.Silvia Lerner - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (1):37-53.
    Expected Utility Theory (EUT) has anomalies when interpreted descriptively and tested empirically. Experiments show that the way in which options are formulated is, in most cases, relevant for decision-making. This kind of anomaly is directly related, however, not with a proper axiom of EUT but rather with the logical principle of extensionality and its decision theoretic version: the principle of invariance. This paper focuses on the phenomenon of framing effects (FE) and the associated failures of invariance. FE arise when different (...)
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  19. Do Financial Professionals Behave According to Prospect Theory? An Experimental Study.Mohammed Abdellaoui, Han Bleichrodt & Hilda Kammoun - 2013 - Theory and Decision 74 (3):411-429.
    Prospect theory is increasingly used to explain deviations from the traditional paradigm of rational agents. Empirical support for prospect theory comes mainly from laboratory experiments using student samples. It is obviously important to know whether and to what extent this support generalizes to more naturally occurring circumstances. This article explores this question and measures prospect theory for a sample of private bankers and fund managers. We obtained clear support for prospect theory. Our financial professionals behaved according to prospect theory and (...)
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  20. Norm Manipulation, Norm Evasion: Experimental Evidence: Cristina Bicchieri and Alex K. Chavez.Cristina Bicchieri & Alex K. Chavez - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):175-198.
    Using an economic bargaining game, we tested for the existence of two phenomena related to social norms, namely norm manipulation – the selection of an interpretation of the norm that best suits an individual – and norm evasion – the deliberate, private violation of a social norm. We found that the manipulation of a norm of fairness was characterized by a self-serving bias in beliefs about what constituted normatively acceptable behaviour, so that an individual who made an uneven bargaining offer (...)
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  21. Moral Cleansing and Moral Licenses: Experimental Evidence.Pablo Brañas-Garza, Marisa Bucheli, María Paz Espinosa & Teresa García-Muñoz - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):199-212.
    Research on moral cleansing and moral self-licensing has introduced dynamic considerations in the theory of moral behaviour. Past bad actions trigger negative feelings that make people more likely to engage in future moral behaviour to offset them. Symmetrically, past good deeds favour a positive self-perception that creates licensing effects, leading people to engage in behaviour that is less likely to be moral. In short, a deviation from a is balanced with a subsequent action that compensates the prior behaviour. We model (...)
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  22. Your Money Or Your Life: Comparing Judgements In Trolley Problems Involving Economic And Emotional Harms, Injury And Death.Natalie Gold, Briony Pulford & Andrew Colman - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):213-233.
    There is a long-standing debate in philosophy about whether it is morally permissible to harm one person in order to prevent a greater harm to others and, if not, what is the moral principle underlying the prohibition. Hypothetical moral dilemmas are used in order to probe moral intuitions. Philosophers use them to achieve a reflective equilibrium between intuitions and principles, psychologists to investigate moral decision-making processes. In the dilemmas, the harms that are traded off are almost always deaths. However, the (...)
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  23. Discussion: Internal Impediments: D. Goldstick.D. Goldstick - 2013 - Philosophy 88 (2):313-315.
    Not everything that it's ‘possible’ FOR you to do is something it's ‘possible’ THAT you will do. The compatibilist freedom formula ‘absence of impediments’ must embrace external and internal – including psychological – impediments. Desires are impediments only when they impede, owing to motivational conflict. But other impediments, external or internal, require merely the potential to impede.
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  24. Parameters of Social Preference Functions: Measurement and External Validity.Christoph Graf, Rudolf Vetschera & Yingchao Zhang - 2013 - Theory and Decision 74 (3):357-382.
    Most of the existing literature on social preferences either tests whether certain characteristics of the social context influence individual decisions, or tries to estimate parameters of social preference functions describing such behavior at the level of the entire population. In the present paper, we are concerned with measuring parameters of social preference functions at the individual level. We draw upon concepts developed for eliciting other types of utility functions, in particular the literature on decision making under incomplete information. Our method (...)
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  25. On the Independence of History: Experience Spill-Overs Between Experiments. [REVIEW]Astrid Matthey & Tobias Regner - 2013 - Theory and Decision 75 (3):403-419.
    A central understanding in experimental economics is that subjects’ decisions in the lab are independent of history. We test whether this assumption of between-experiment independence is indeed justified. We analyze experiments with an allocation decision and find that participation in previous experiments tends to increase the amount subjects allocate to themselves. Hence, independence between experiments cannot be presumed if subjects participate repeatedly. The finding has implications for the interpretation of previous allocation decision results and deserves attention when running future experiments.
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  26. Folk Retributivism And The Communication Confound.Thomas Nadelhoffer, Saeideh Heshmati, Deanna Kaplan & Shaun Nichols - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (2):235-261.
    Retributivist accounts of punishment maintain that it is right to punish wrongdoers, even if the punishment has no future benefits. Research in experimental economics indicates that people are willing to pay to punish defectors. A complementary line of work in social psychology suggests that people think that it is right to punish wrongdoers. This work suggests that people are retributivists about punishment. However, all of the extant work contains an important potential confound. The target of the punishment is expected to (...)
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  27. Reliability and External Validity of Neurobiological Experiments.Wong Muk Yan - 2013 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (4):429-446.
    Reliability and external validity are two fundamental values that pose incompatible constraints on neurobiological experiments. The more reliability an experimental result achieves, the less external validity it earns, and vice versa. In this article, I propose an externalist interpretation of external validity: the external validity of an experimental result depends not only on how much complexity is built into an experimental design, but also on the relationship between the experimental result and other related experiments. This externalist interpretation, which explains how (...)
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  28. Perspective in Intentional Action Attribution.Adam Feltz, Maegan Harris & Ashley Perez - 2012 - Philosophical Psychology 25 (5):673-687.
    In two experiments, we demonstrate that intentional action intuitions vary as a function of whether one brings about or observes an event. In experiment 1a (N?=?38), participants were less likely to judge that they intended (M?=?2.53, 7 point scale) or intentionally (M?=?2.67) brought about a harmful event compared to intention (M?=?4.16) and intentionality (M?=?4.11) judgments made about somebody else. Experiments 1b and 1c confirmed and extended this pattern of actor-observer differences. Experiment 2 suggested that these actor-observer differences are not likely (...)
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  29. A Test of the Experimental Method in the Spirit of Popper.Shaun Hargreaves Heap, Arjan Verschoor & Daniel John Zizzo - 2012 - Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (1):63-76.
    Do the insights into human behavior generated by laboratory experiments hold outside the lab? This is a crucial question that naturally troubles both experimentalists and their critics. We address this question by adopting Popper's injunction that hypotheses should be tested, not by seeking instances of confirmation, but through exposure to conditions where falsification is a serious possibility. We test the hypothesis ?that experimental insights hold outside the lab? by selecting a population where the non-experimental evidence points to behavior that is (...)
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  30. Gigerenzer’s ‘External Validity Argument’ Against the Heuristics and Biases Program: An Assessment.Andrea Polonioli - 2012 - Mind and Society 11 (2):133-148.
    Gigerenzer’s ‘external validity argument’ plays a pivotal role in his critique of the heuristics and biases research program (HB). The basic idea is that (a) the experimental contexts deployed by HB are not representative of the real environment and that (b) the differences between the setting and the real environment are causally relevant, because they result in different performances by the subjects. However, by considering Gigerenzer’s work on frequencies in probability judgments, this essay attempts to show that there are fatal (...)
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  31. Warranting the Use of Causal Claims: A Non-Trivial Case for Interdisciplinarity.Menno Rol & Nancy Cartwright - 2012 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 27 (2):189-202.
    To what use can causal claims established in good policy studies be put? We isolate two reasons inferences from study to target fail. First, policy variables do not produce results on their own; they need helping factors. The distribution of helping factors is likely to be unique or local for each study, so one cannot expect external validity to be all that common. Second, researchers often give too concrete a description of the cause in the study for it to carry (...)
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  32. Empirical Social Choice: Questionnaire-Experimental Studies on Distributive Justice, Gaertner and Schokkaert. Cambridge University Press, 2012, 228 Pages. [REVIEW]Joshua Rust - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):443-450.
    Book Reviews Joshua Rust, Economics and Philosophy, FirstView Article.
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  33. Drawing Lessons From Case Studies by Enhancing Comparability.Attilia Ruzzene - 2012 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (1):99-120.
    External validity is typically regarded as the downside of case study research by methodologists and social scientists; case studies, however, are often aimed at drawing lessons that are generalizable to new contexts. The gap between the generalizability potential of case studies and the research goals demands closer scrutiny. I suggest that the conclusion that case study research is weak in external validity follows from a set of assumptions that I term the "traditional view," which are disputable at best. In this (...)
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  34. The Experimental Method in Economics: Old Issues and New Challenges.Daniel Serra - 2012 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 13 (1):3.
  35. A Response to Binmore, Harrison and Ross onExperimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules.Nicholas Bardsley, Chris Starmer, Robin Cubitt, Graham Loomes, Peter Moffatt & Robert Sugden - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):195-199.
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  36. Trustworthiness is a Social Norm, but Trusting is Not.Cristina Bicchieri, Erte Xiao & Ryan Muldoon - 2011 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (2):170-187.
    Previous literature has demonstrated the important role that trust plays in developing and maintaining well-functioning societies. However, if we are to learn how to increase levels of trust in society, we must first understand why people choose to trust others. One potential answer to this is that people view trust as normative: there is a social norm for trusting that imposes punishment for noncompliance. To test this, we report data from a survey with salient rewards to elicit people’s attitudes regarding (...)
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  37. Open for Business: Learning Economics Through Social Interaction in a Student-Operated Store.John P. Broome & Patrice Preston-Grimes - 2011 - Journal of Social Studies Research 35 (1):39-55.
    This study examines teaching and learning economics and entrepreneurship through a student-run Montessori middle school store. By designing and managing a school store, students created a "community of practice" to learn economics concepts in their daily environment. Questions guiding this study were: (a) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics content knowledge? (b) How do students' social-interactions in a Montessori middle school student-operated business demonstrate economics skills? (c) How do students' business roles in the (...)
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  38. Review of Experimental Economics: Rethinking the Rules. [REVIEW]Andrew Caplin - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (2):179-183.
  39. Hayek in the Lab. Austrian School, Game Theory, and Experimental Economics.Gustavo Cevolani - 2011 - Logic and Philosophy of Science 9 (1):429-436.
    Focusing on the work of Friedrich von Hayek and Vernon Smith, we discuss some conceptual links between Austrian economics and recent work in behavioral game theory and experimental economics. After a brief survey of the main methodological aspects of Austrian and experimental economics, we suggest that common views on subjectivism, individualism, and the role of qualitative explanations and predictions in social science may favour a fruitful interaction between these two research programs.
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  40. Virtually Science: An Agent-Based Model of the Rise and Fall of Scientific Research Programs.Daniel Farhat - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):363-385.
    Is there more to? good science? than explaining novel facts? Social interaction within scientific communities plays a pivotal role in defining acceptable research practices. This article explores the connection between research outcomes and the socio-cultural environment they are constructed in by developing an agent-based computational model of scientific communities. Agent-to-agent interaction is added to a system of knowledge production inspired by the work of Lakatos on scientific research programs as an important factor guiding the actions of researchers. Simulation results show (...)
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  41. Theory-Centrism in Experimental Economics.Francesco Guala - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):83-86.
  42. The Methodological Promise of Experimental Economics.Glenn W. Harrison - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (2):183-187.
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  43. How Validity Travelled to Economic Experimenting.Floris Heukelom - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (1):13-28.
    Validity was first given a more specifically scientific meaning by psychologists in the early twentieth century in the contexts of psychological tests. Following the classification of different validity-types in the American Psychological Association's Technical Recommendations, validity travelled from psychological tests to psychological experiments through the work of Donald Campbell. Thus the idea was introduced that also experiments could be more or less valid. In addition, a distinction was made between the internal and the external validity of an experiment. Of the (...)
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  44. Review of The Social Epistemology of Experimental Economics. [REVIEW]Martin Jones - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (1):64-69.
  45. External Validity and Libraries of Phenomena: A Critique of Guala's Methodology of Experimental Economics: Martin K. Jones.Martin K. Jones - 2011 - Economics and Philosophy 27 (3):247-271.
    Francesco Guala has developed some novel and radical ideas on the problem of external validity, a topic that has not received much attention in the experimental economics literature. In this paper I argue that his views on external validity are not justified and the conclusions which he draws from these views, if widely adopted, could substantially undermine the experimental economics enterprise. In rejecting the justification of these views, the paper reaffirms the importance of experiments in economics.
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  46. Experiments on an Internal Approach to Typed Algorithms in Analysis.Dag Normann - 2011 - In S. B. Cooper & Andrea Sorbi (eds.), Computability in Context: Computation and Logic in the Real World. World Scientific. pp. 297.
  47. Estranged Parents and a Schizophrenic Child: Choice in Economics, Psychology and Neuroeconomics.Don Ross - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):217-231.
    Gul and Pesendorfer provide the best-known and most strident of a set of recent backlashes by economists against methodological revolutions promoted by some behavioural economists and neuroeconomists. Philosophers are likely to read these responses as merely reactionary, especially as their rhetoric goes beyond what their explicit argumentation validly supports. The present paper identifies the accurate insight on Gul and Pesendorfer's part that explains the impact of their philosophically ragged polemic. This centers on importantly different concepts of choice in the psychological (...)
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  48. Implementing Theoretical Models in the Laboratory, and What This Can and Cannot Achieve.Stefania Sitzia & Robert Sugden - 2011 - Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (4):323-343.
    We investigate the methodology used in a significant genre of experimental economics, in which experiments are designed to test theoretical models by implementing them in the laboratory. Using two case studies, we argue that such an experiment is a test, not of what the model says about its target domain, but of generic theoretical components used in the model. The properties that make a model interesting as a putative explanation of phenomena in its target domain are not necessarily appropriate for (...)
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  49. Review of Thaler & Sunstein 'Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness'. [REVIEW]Joel Anderson - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (3):369-376.
    The present book makes a particularly engaging case for a whole range of policy implications of behavioural economics. The rhetoric is highly compelling, and their approach is already having a significant impact. However, while the wider audience for whom the book is written may not be interested in the justification of the underlying principles, it is precisely the cracks in the foundations that pose the greatest threat to the project. For example, if Thaler and Sunstein are to have any chance (...)
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  50. Do Neurobiological Data Help Us to Understand Economic Decisions Better?Alessandro Antonietti - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):207-218.
    The contribution that neurobiological data provide us to comprehend the psychological aspects of economic decision-making is critically examined. First, different kinds of correspondences between neural events and mental activities are identified. On the basis of the distinctions made, some recent studies are selected, each of which focuses on a different stage of decision-making and employs a different set of neurobiological data. The thorough analysis of each study suggests that neuro-mental correspondences do not have an evidentiary function but rather a heuristic (...)
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