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  1. added 2020-02-26
    A Defence of Sexual Inclusion.John Danaher - forthcoming - Social Theory and Practice.
    This article argues that access to meaningful sexual experience should be included within the set of the goods that are subject to principles of distributive justice. It argues that some people are currently unjustly excluded from meaningful sexual experience and it is not implausible to suggest that they might thereby have certain claim rights to sexual inclusion. This does not entail that anyone has a right to sex with another person, but it does entail that duties may be imposed on (...)
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  2. added 2020-02-11
    Relational Autonomy: Feminist Perspectives on Autonomy, Agency, and the Social Self.Sue Campbell - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):165-168.
  3. added 2019-09-28
    Relational Autonomy and Practical Authority.Andrea Westlund - 2018 - In Pieranna Garavaso (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Analytic Feminism.
    Autonomy, at least in one sense of the term, requires sovereign authority over one’s choices and actions. In this paper, I argue that such authority is relational in at least two respects. First, I argue that sovereign authority may be shared – and, indeed, must be shareable – with others through the exercise of normative powers. Second, I argue that normative powers are themselves relational powers, powers that depend in part on the recognition of agents as having an equal basic (...)
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  4. added 2019-09-27
    Autonomy and Self-Care.Andrea Westlund - 2014 - In Mark Piper & Andrea Veltman (eds.), Autonomy, Oppression, and Gender. New York, NY, USA:
    Recent feminist accounts of autonomy have focused both on autonomous agents’ relationships to others and on their self-regarding attitudes or self-relations. This chapter focuses on the attitude of practical self-care, arguing that autonomous agents must care about themselves in a sense that amounts to caring about their practical reasons. While self-care is primarily a self-relation, it also implies a form of interpersonal relationality. Caring about one’s reasons requires caring about intersubjective assessments thereof, and the relation of self-care thus implies openness (...)
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  5. added 2019-09-27
    Autonomy in Relation.Andrea Westlund - 2012 - In Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (eds.), Out From the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy.
    This essay identifies a connection between the capacities required for individual autonomy and the capacities required for a particular form of shared agency. Like other feminist philosophers, I hold that individual autonomy must be understood in relational terms. In the first section of the essay, I argue that that autonomy is constitutively relational in the sense that it depends upon a dialogical disposition to hold oneself answerable to external, critical perspectives. In the second section, I argue that this disposition is (...)
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  6. added 2019-09-02
    Othered Body, Obscene Self(Ie): A Sartrean Reading of Kim Kardashian-West.Elese B. Dowden & Elese Dowden - 2017 - Hecate 43 (2):117-130.
    In this existential reading of Kim Kardashian-West's International Women's Day selfie of 2016, I focus on the rise of selfie culture and public discourse around emerging digital representations of women's bodies. The selfie is a relatively new phenomenon, and is particularly curious because of the subject/object paradox it creates; in taking a selfie, a person asserts control over their own image, but at the same time, becomes object in their own gaze. My argument is that selfies, like other assertions of (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-20
    Review of Cynthia Daniels, At Women's Expense. [REVIEW]Donna Dickenson - 1995 - Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (1):61.
  8. added 2019-06-06
    "Overcoming Objectification: A Carnal Ethics," by Ann J. Cahill. [REVIEW]Shoshana Brassfield - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):217-221.
    The central argument of Ann Cahill’s Overcoming Objectification is that the concept of sexual objectification should be replaced by Cahill’s concept of derivatization in order to better capture the wrongness of degrading images and practices without depending on an objectionably narrow and disembodied conception of self. To derivatize someone is not to treat her as a non-person, but rather to treat her as a derivative person, reducing her to an aspect of another’s being. Although not perfect, Cahill’s approach advances the (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-05
    Invisible Women in Reproductive Technologies: Critical Reflections.Piyali Mitra - 2018 - Indian Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (2):NS: 113-9.
    The recent spectacular progress in assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) has resulted in new ethical dilemmas. Though women occupy a central role in the reproductive process, within the ART paradigm, the importance accorded to the embryo commonly surpasses that given to the mother. This commentary questions the increasing tendency to position the embryonic subject in an antagonistic relation with the mother. I examine how the mother’s reproductive autonomy is compromised in relation to that of her embryo and argue in favour of (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-05
    The Complex Balancing Act of Choice, Autonomy, Valued Life, and Rights: Bringing a Feminist Disability Perspective to Bioethics.Helen Meekosha - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):1-8.
    Disabled women were absent for many years from the discipline that has become known as women and gender studies. This field of study had its origins in the late 1970s following the second wave of feminism. In the latter decades of the twentieth century, disabled women and their allies introduced the necessary task of exploring disabled women's embodiment to the wider feminist community. A wealth of research now exists that incorporates disabled women's bodies into a range of disciplines: from literature, (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-05
    Sympathetic Distrust: Liberalism and the Sexual Autonomy of Women.Baukje Prins - 2008 - Social Theory and Practice 34 (2):243-270.
    This paper compares two recent public debates in the Netherlands: the debate initiated by Ayaan Hirsi Ali on the position of Muslim women on the one hand, and discussions regarding the situation of female sex workers since the legalization of Dutch prostitution in 2000 on the other. It is argued that liberal public policies should not always be guided by the unconditional respect for the autonomy of (adult) citizens, but that it sometimes seems wiser to adopt an attitude of sympathetic (...)
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  12. added 2019-05-22
    History and Responsibility.Marilyn Frye - 1985 - Women's Studies International Forum 8 (3):215-217.
  13. added 2018-08-14
    Abortion and a Woman's Right to Decide.Alison Jaggar - 1973 - Philosophical Forum 5 (1):347.
  14. added 2018-02-17
    Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University.Paul Benson - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  15. added 2018-01-29
    Do Muslim Women Need Freedom.Serene J. Khader - 2016 - Politics and Gender 2 (4).
  16. added 2018-01-29
    Beyond Autonomy Fetishism.Serene J. Khader - 2015 - Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 17.
  17. added 2017-12-06
    Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment. By SERENE J. KHADER. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.Asha Bhandary - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):390-393.
  18. added 2017-09-11
    Sexual Objectification.Timo Jütten - 2016 - Ethics 127 (1):27-49.
    © 2016 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. According to Martha Nussbaum, objectification is essentially a form of instrumentalization or use. I argue that this instrumentalization account fails to capture the distinctive harms and wrongs of sexual objectification, because it does not explain the relationship between instrumentalization and the processes of social stereotyping that make it possible. I develop an imposition account of sexual objectification that provides such an explanation and, therefore, should be preferred over the instrumentalization account. (...)
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  19. added 2017-02-10
    Relational Group Autonomy: Ethics of Care and the Multiculturalism Paradigm.Fiona MacDonald - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):196 - 212.
    In recent decades, group autonomy approaches to have gained kgitimacy within both academic and policy circles. This article examines the centrality of group autonomy in the multiculturalism debate, particuhrly in the highly influential approach of Will Kymlicka. I argue that his response to the dilemmas of liberd-democratic multiculturalism relies on an underdeveloped conceptualization of group autonomy. Despite presumably good intentions, his narrow notion of cultural group autonomy obscures the requirements of minority group members' democratic capabilities and thereby works against the (...)
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  20. added 2017-01-15
    Problems with Autonomy.Beate Rössler - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):143-162.
    The article first develops an account of autonomy, explaining individual autonomy by means of three normative components and then discussing two objections. The first objection claims that autonomy has to be thought of as essentially relational; this objection is refuted. The second objection, labeled the skeptical objection, claims that we simply do not live autonomously, nor could we ever. Reference is made to novels by Iris Murdoch to present a skeptical solution to this objection.
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  21. added 2017-01-09
    Western Ethnocentrism and Perceptions of the Harem.Leila Ahmed - 1982 - Feminist Studies 8 (3):521.
  22. added 2016-12-08
    It’s My Body and I’Ll Do What I Like With It.Anne Phillips - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (6):724-748.
    What, if any, is the problem with treating bodies as objects or property? Is there a defensible basis for seeing bodies as different from "other" material resources? Or is thinking the body special a kind of sentimentalism that blocks clear thinking about matters such as prostitution, surrogate motherhood, and the sale of spare kidneys? I argue that the language we use does matter, and that thinking of the body as property encourages a self/body dualism that obscures the power relations involved (...)
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  23. added 2016-12-08
    Rethinking Relational Autonomy.Andrea C. Westlund - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (4):26-49.
    John Christman has argued that constitutively relational accounts of autonomy, as defended by some feminist theorists, are problematically perfectionist about the human good. I argue that autonomy is constitutively relational, but not in a way that implies perfectionism: autonomy depends on a dialogical disposition to hold oneself answerable to external, critical perspectives on one's action-guiding commitments. This type of relationality carries no substantive value commitments, yet it does answer to core feminist concerns about autonomy.
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  24. added 2016-09-10
    Implied Consent and Sexual Assault: Intimate Relationships, Autonomy, and Voice by Michael Plaxton. [REVIEW]Lucinda Vandervort - 2016 - Canadian Journal of Women and the Law 28:697-702.
    This is a review and critical commentary on Michael Plaxton's 2015 book, Implied Consent and Sexual Assault, in which he proposes that the legal definition of sexual consent be amended to permit sexual partners to define the terms and conditions of sexual consent in accordance with private "normative commitments" between themselves. The proposed "reform" is intended to permit an individual to agree to be a party to sexual activity that would otherwise constitute sexual assault under Canadian law. For reasons explained (...)
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  25. added 2016-09-08
    Liberal Dependency Care.Asha Bhandary - 2016 - Journal of Philosophical Research 41:43-68.
    Dependency care is an asymmetric good; everyone needs to receive it, but it is not the case that we all have to provide it. Despite ethicists’ of care’s theorizing about the importance of dependency care, it has yet to be theorized within a form of liberalism. This paper theorizes two components of a liberal theory of dependency care. First, it advances a liberal justification to include the receipt of dependency care among the benefits of social cooperation. Then, it advances an (...)
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  26. added 2016-08-23
    Women's Agency in a Context of Oppression: Assessing Strategies for Personal Action and Public Policy.Carol Chetkovich - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):122-143.
    Popular debates about “victim feminism” have receded but underlying concerns about the extent of gender inequality and usefulness of strategies highlighting difference are still relevant. This paper applies Susan Wendell's framework—relating to women's agency under conditions of oppression—to the experience of women firefighters. The framework fits well, but one case reveals the need to modify it by attending to community. An elaboration of the framework is then used to examine four policy issues.
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  27. added 2016-08-12
    Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect.Marguerite La Caze - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  28. added 2016-08-11
    Marx, Rawls, Cohen, and Feminism.Paula Casal - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):811-828.
    Although G. A. Cohen's work on Marx was flawed by a lack of gender-awareness, his work on Rawls owes much of its success to feminist inspiration. Cohen appeals effectively to feminism to rebut the basic structure objection to his egalitarian ethos, and could now appeal to feminism in response to Andrew Williams's publicity objection to this ethos. The article argues that Williams's objection is insufficient to rebut Cohen's ethos, inapplicable to variants of this ethos, and in conflict with plausible gender-egalitarian (...)
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  29. added 2016-08-11
    Sexuality Situated: Beauvoir on "Frigidity".Suzanne Laba Cataldi - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):70-82.
    This essay relates scenes from Beauvoir's novels to her views of female eroticism and frigidity in The Second Sex. Expressions of frigidity signal unjust power relations in Beauvoir's literature. She constructs frigidity as a symbolic means of rejecting dominance in heterosexual relations. Thus frigidity need not be interpreted, as it sometimes is, as a form of bad faith. The essay concludes with some thoughts on the relevance of Beauvoir's view of frigidity to contemporary feminism.
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  30. added 2016-08-11
    Working with Men Feminism and Social Work.Kate Cavanagh & Viviene E. Cree - 1996
  31. added 2016-07-21
    Internalized Oppression and Its Varied Moral Harms: Self‐Perceptions of Reduced Agency and Criminality.Nabina Liebow - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):713-729.
    The dominant view in the philosophical literature contends that internalized oppression, especially that experienced in virtue of one's womanhood, reduces one's sense of agency. Here, I extend these arguments and suggest a more nuanced account. In particular, I argue that internalized oppression can cause a person to conceive of herself as a deviant agent as well as a reduced one. This self-conception is also damaging to one's moral identity and creates challenges that are not captured by merely analyzing a reduced (...)
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  32. added 2016-06-12
    Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage.Victor J. Callan - 1986 - Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  33. added 2016-05-17
    From Ethical Substance to Reflection: Hegel’s Antigone.Victoria I. Burke - 2008 - Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 41 (3).
    Hegel’s treatment of Sophocles’s Antigone exposes a tension in our own landscape between religious and civil autonomy. This tension reflects a deeper tension between unreflective, implicit norms and reflective, explicit norms that can be autonomously endorsed. The tension is, as Hegel recognizes, of particular importance to women. Hegel’s characterization of this tension in light of Antigone is, as H.S. Harris argues, both a more developed and a more fundamental moment in the Phenomenology of Spirit than the moment of Enlightenment autonomy (...)
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  34. added 2016-05-17
    Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but it also (...)
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  35. added 2016-05-17
    Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but it also (...)
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  36. added 2016-05-17
    Hegel's Concept of Mutual Recognition: The Limits of Self-Determination.Victoria Burke - 2005 - Philosophical Forum 36 (2):213-220.
    For Hegel, the ideal relation that two self-conscious beings might have to each other is one of reciprocal mutual recognition. According to Hegel, “a self-consciousness exists for [another] consciousness.” That is, self-consciousness is defined by its being recognized as self-conscious by another self-consciousness. In one formulation, Robert Pippin says that this means that “being a free agent consists in being recognized as one.” However, at the same time, Hegel values self-determination, which suggests a fundamental independence from others. The formative activity (...)
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  37. added 2016-05-17
    The Family in a Changing World.Robert L. Burgess - 1994 - Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and one form (...)
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  38. added 2016-05-17
    Manhood and Politics.Wendy Brown - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  39. added 2016-05-17
    Emigration for Women.E. L. Browne - 1883
  40. added 2016-04-22
    The Case for Our Widespread Dependency.Kathryn Norlock - 2004 - Social Theory and Practice 30 (2):247-257.
  41. added 2016-04-14
    Feeling Power: Emotions and Education.Megan Boler - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):205-209.
  42. added 2016-04-14
    “Maleness” Revisited.Susan Bordo - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):197-207.
    My response to the preceding commentaries draws on recent events such as the Thomas/Hill hearings to illustrate some of my central arguments in “Feminist Skepticism and the ‘Maleness’ of Philosophy.” I also attempt to clarify frequently misunderstood aspects of my use of gender as an analytical category, and discuss why, in my opinion, we should continue to care about the “maleness” of philosophy.
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  43. added 2016-04-08
    A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role.Sandrine Bergès - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  44. added 2016-04-08
    February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body.Debra Bergoffen - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been pros-ecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  45. added 2016-04-08
    Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest.Debra B. Bergoffen - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  46. added 2016-04-08
    Feminist Second Thoughts About Free Agency.Paul Benson - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):47-64.
    This essay suggests that common themes in recent feminist ethical thought can dislodge the guiding assumptions of traditional theories of free agency and thereby foster an account of freedom which might be more fruitful for feminist discussion of moral and political agency. The essay proposes constructing that account around a condition of normative-competence. It argues that this view permits insight into why women's labor of reclaiming and augmenting their agency is both difficult and possible in a sexist society.
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  47. added 2016-04-05
    A Woman’s Scorn.Macalester Bell - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
    In an effort to reclaim women's moral psychology, feminist philosophers have reevaluated several seemingly negative emotions such as anger, resentment, and bitterness. However, one negative emotion has yet to receive adequate attention from feminist philosophers: contempt. 1 argue that feminists should reconsider what role feelings of contempt for male oppressors and male'dominated institutions and practices should play in our lives. 1 begin by surveying four feminist defenses of the negative emotions. I then offer a brief sketch of the nature and (...)
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  48. added 2016-04-05
    Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's “The Damnation of Women,” which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  49. added 2016-04-05
    A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion.Macalester Bell - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
    In an effort to reclaim women's moral psychology, feminist philosophers have reevaluated several seemingly negative emotions such as anger, resentment, and bitterness. However, one negative emotion has yet to receive adequate attention from feminist philosophers: contempt. 1 argue that feminists should reconsider what role feelings of contempt for male oppressors and male'dominated institutions and practices should play in our lives. 1 begin by surveying four feminist defenses of the negative emotions. I then offer a brief sketch of the nature and (...)
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  50. added 2016-04-05
    Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination.Sandra Bartky - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
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