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  1. An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives.Pamela Abbott - 2005 - Routledge.
    This third edition of the bestselling An Introduction to Sociology: Feminist Perspectives confirms the ongoing centrality of feminist perspectives and research to the sociological enterprise and introduces students to the wide range of feminist contributions to key areas of sociological concern. This completely revised edition includes: · new chapters on sexuality and the media · additional material on race and ethnicity, disability and the body · many new international and comparative examples · the influence of theories of globalization and post-colonial (...)
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  2. REVIEW: Robert A. Aronowitz. Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. [REVIEW]Joelle M. Abi-Rached - 2011 - Spontaneous Generations 5 (1):79-82.
    “Breast cancer is all around us.” This is how Robert Aronowitz, a medical doctor, opens his timely Unnatural History: Breast Cancer and American Society. We are all familiar with the truism that “one in eight American women” will develop invasive breast cancer over the course of her lifetime. The pink ribbon has come to symbolize both solidarity and hope. Mammograms and “Self-Breast Examination” have become part of women’s daily routine, if not a spectre haunting their daily lives. Yet the evidence (...)
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  3. Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  4. Conceptions of Life and Man—Basics of “Social Communications”(as Exemplified by the “Charter on the (Re-) Presentation of Disabled People in the Med).Jeff Bernard - 1998 - Σημιοτκή-Sign Systems Studies 1:372-391.
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  5. Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
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  6. Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum.Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris - 2006 - In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers.
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (or (...)
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  7. My Two Moms: Disability, Queer Kinship, and the Maternal Subject.Harold Braswell - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):234-250.
    Dominant Western discourses of motherhood have depicted disabled women as incapable of being mothers. In contrast to these representations, recent literature in disability studies has argued that disabled women can provide maternal care and should therefore retain custody over their children. This literature is commendable, but its emphasis on custodial rights excludes from the category of “mother” those disabled women who cannot maintain child custody. In this article, I challenge this exclusion via an account of my experience with my two (...)
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  8. Care of the Handicapped Newborn: Parental Responsibility and Medical Responsibility.M. J. Brueton - 1988 - Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (1):48-49.
  9. Choosing Who Will Be Disabled: Genetic Intervention and the Morality of Inclusion.Allen Buchanan - 1996 - Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (2):18.
    The Nobel prize-winning molecular biologist Walter Gilbert described the mapping and sequencing of the human genome as “the grail of molecular biology.” The implication, endorsed by enthusiasts for the new genetics, is that possessing a comprehensive knowledge of human genetics, like possessing the Holy Grail, will give us miraculous powers to heal the sick, and to reduce human suffering and disabilities. Indeed, the rhetoric invoked to garner public support for the Human Genome Project appears to appeal to the best of (...)
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  10. The Foundations of the Politics of Difference.Peter Nathaniel Bwanali - 2004 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    This dissertation approaches Iris Marion Young's politics of difference as an essential condition for deliberative democracy. It identifies and examines Young's arguments in four areas foundational to the politics of difference namely, inclusion, political equality, reasonableness and publicity. It contends that some of the arguments sustaining these foundations are shaky. Therefore, the dissertation attempts to improve the weak aspects of Young's arguments in order to solidify the basis for the politics of difference and, in so doing, facilitate the development of (...)
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  11. Book Review: Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW]Joan Callahan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  12. Review of Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions by Anita Silvers and Leslie Pickering Francis. [REVIEW]Joan C. Callahan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4).
  13. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions (Review).Joan C. Callahan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  14. Review of Elizabeth Barnes, The Minority Body. [REVIEW]Stephen M. Campbell & Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  15. Feminist Approaches to Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):541-553.
    This essay explores various philosophical approaches to cognitive disability within feminist philosophy. In doing so, it addresses three broad questions: What positive contributions can feminist philosophy make to the philosophy of cognitive disability? How have feminist philosophers critiqued the presence and absence of cognitive disability in philosophy? And what challenges does cognitive disability pose to feminist philosophy itself? The essay begins with definitions and models of disability and then turns to feminist work on cognitive disability in moral and political philosophy, (...)
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  16. Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  17. Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  18. Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
  19. Feminism and the Female Body: Liberating the Amazon Within.Shirley Castelnuovo - 1998 - L. Rienner Publishers.
  20. Justifying an Adequate Response to the Vulnerable Other.Kavanagh Chandra - 2016 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 7:57-70.
    Is it possible to justify requiring that I respond adequately to the other’s vulnerability? I contend that insofar as I value my own personal identity it is consistent to respond adequately to the vulnerability of the other. Part one provides a break down of vulnerability in terms of its fundamental indeterminacy. Part two illustrates how the ability to respond either adequately or inadequately to the other’s vulnerability is implied by the fundamental co-constitution of personal identity. I understand myself as a (...)
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  21. The Commodification of Care.Rutger Claassen - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):43-64.
    This paper discusses the question whether care work for dependent persons (children, the elderly, and disabled persons) may be entrusted to the market; that is, whether and to what extent there is a normative justification for the “commodification of care.” It first proposes a capability theory for care that raises two relevant demands: a basic capability for receiving care and a capability for giving care. Next it discusses and rejects two objections that aim to show that market-based care undermines the (...)
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  22. Care, Disability, and Violence: Theorizing Complex Dependency in Eva Kittay and Judith Butler.Stacy Clifford Simplican - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):217-233.
    How do we theorize the experiences of caregivers abused by their children with autism without intensifying stigma toward disability? Eva Kittay emphasizes examples of extreme vulnerability to overturn myths of independence, but she ignores the possibility that dependents with disabilities may be vulnerable and aggressive. Instead, her work over-emphasizes caregivers' capabilities and the constancy of disabled dependents' vulnerability. I turn to Judith Butler's ethics and her conception of the self as opaque to rethink care amid conflict. Person-centered planning approaches, pioneered (...)
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  23. Sensing Disability.Mairian Corker - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):34-52.
    : Disability theory privileges masculinist notions of presence, visibility, material "reality," and identity as "given." One effect of this has been the erasure of "sensibility," which, it is argued, inscribes, materializes, and performs the critique of binary thought. Therefore, sensibility must be re-articulated in order to escape the "necessary error" of identity implicit in accounts of cultural diversity, and to dialogue across difference in ways that dislocate disability from its position of dis-value in feminist thought.
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  24. Sensing Disability.Mairian Corker - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):34-52.
    Disability theory privileges masculinist notions of presence, visibility, material "reality," and identity as "given." One effect of this has been the erasure of "sensibility," which, it is argued, inscribes, materializes, and performs the critique of binary thought. Therefore, sensibility must be re-articulated in order to escape the "necessary error" of identity implicit in accounts of cultural diversity, and to dialogue across difference in ways that dislocate disability from its position of dis-value in feminist thought.
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  25. Susan Wendell, The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability Reviewed By.Renée Cox Lorraine - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17 (2):149-151.
  26. Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities.Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    : This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
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  27. Informed Dissent: The View of a Disabled Woman.A. Davis - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):75-76.
    Madeleine Simms begins her article by saying that it will attempt to `redress the balance' of views on the conflicting rights of handicapped children and their parents. I, on the other hand, will argue that no semblance of a balance has yet been achieved, and that her questions and conclusions merely serve to tip the scales further away from a genuine rights-based theory to a pragmatic utilitarian assessment of individual `worth'.
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  28. Handicap et animaux.Nicolas Delon - 2012 - In Sandra Laugier (ed.), Tous vulnérables ? Le care, les animaux et l'environnement. Payot-Rivages. pp. 99-121.
    This paper addresses issues in comparing nonhuman animals and severely disabled human beings in terms of their morally relevant characteristics. Through a discussion of the works of Jeff McMahan, Eva Feder Kittay and Martha Nussbaum, the paper offers a defense of the importance and possibility of extending care and compassion to nonhumans without collapsing relevant species differences.
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  29. Review of Dangerous Discourses of Disability, Subjectivity, and Sexuality. By Margrit Shildrick. [REVIEW]Emilie Dionne - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):658-662.
  30. Revisiting the Corpus of the Madwoman: Further Notes Toward a Feminist Disability Studies Theory of Mental Illness.Elizabeth J. Donaldson - 2011 - In Kim Q. Hall (ed.), Feminist Disability Studies. Indiana University Press. pp. 91--114.
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  31. Hegel, Feminist Philosophy, and Disability: Rereading Our History.Jane Dryden - 2013 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 33 (4).
    Although feminist philosophers have been critical of the gendered norms contained within the history of philosophy, they have not extended this critical analysis to norms concerning disability. In the history of Western philosophy, disability has often functioned as a metaphor for something that has gone awry. This trope, according to which disability is something that has gone wrong, is amply criticized within Disability Studies, though not within the tradition of philosophy itself or even within feminist philosophy. In this paper, I (...)
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  32. The Anomalous Wellbeing of Disabled People: A Response.Claire Edwards - 2013 - Topoi 32 (2):189-196.
    Disabled people frequently find themselves in situations where their quality of life and wellbeing is being measured or judged by others, whether in decisions about health care provision or assessments for social supports. Recent debates about wellbeing and how it might be assessed (through subjective and/or objective measures) have prompted a renewed focus on disabled people’s wellbeing because of its seemingly ‘anomalous’ nature; that is, whilst to external (objective) observers the wellbeing of disabled people appears poor, based on subjective assessments, (...)
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  33. Review of Disability Bioethics: Moral Bodies, Moral Difference by Jackie Leach Scully. [REVIEW]Andrew Fenton & Timothy Krahn - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):651-655.
  34. Marriage, Mental Handicap, and Sexuality.K. L. Flannery - 2004 - Studies in Christian Ethics 17 (3):11-26.
  35. Manufacturing Disability: HIV, Women and the Construction of Difference.Marilou Gagnon & Meryn Stuart - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):42-52.
    In 1998, the US Supreme Court first held that asymptomatic HIV infection constituted a disability when it ruled on the case of Bragdon v. Abbott. The use of yet another label to identify women living with HIV has been rarely questioned. While we do value the use of this label as an anti-discriminatory strategy, we believe that there is a need to examine how language and more specifically, the use of words such as disability, limitation, and impairment may create new (...)
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  36. Tackling Murderball: Masculinity, Disability and the Big Screen.Michael Gard & Hayley Fitzgerald - 2008 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):126 – 141.
    The sport of wheelchair rugby is the subject of a recent film Murderball, which tells the story of the apparently intense rivalry between the Canadian and United States men's teams. In part, the story is told through the lives of some of the game's leading players and coaches. Murderball deals with a series of ethical and political questions concerned with conceptions of disability, articulations of sporting bodies, and the value attached to sporting performance. In this paper we offer a critique (...)
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  37. Misfits: A Feminist Materialist Disability Concept.Rosemarie Garland-Thomson - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (3):591-609.
    This article offers the critical concept misfit in an effort to further think through the lived identity and experience of disability as it is situated in place and time. The idea of a misfit and the situation of misfitting that I offer here elaborate a materialist feminist understanding of disability by extending a consideration of how the particularities of embodiment interact with the environment in its broadest sense, to include both its spatial and temporal aspects. The interrelated dynamics of fitting (...)
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  38. Disabled Women: An Excluded Agenda of Indian Feminism.Anita Ghai - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):49-66.
    : My purpose in this essay is to locate disabled women within the women's movement as well as the disability movement in India. While foregrounding the existential realities for disabled women in the Indian scene, I underscore the reasons for their absence from the agenda of Indian feminism. I conclude by reflecting on the possibilities of inclusion within Indian feminist thought.
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  39. Estudio piloto sobre la prevalencia del acoso psicológico (mobbing) en trabajadores de centros de atención a personas con discapacidad.R. Gil Monte Pedro, Carretero Noelia, Desamparados Roldán Maria & Caro Marcos - 2006 - Aletheia 23:07-16.
    O presente estudo tem por objetivo a análise da prevalência de mobbing numa amostra de trabalhadores de centros de apoio a pessoas com deficiências. Utilizando uma amostra de 67 profissionais, e mediante um questionário formado por 30 itens, elaborado a partir do Leymann Inventory Psychological Terr..
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  40. 'You Say You're Happy, But…': Contested Quality of Life Judgments in Bioethics and Disability Studies. [REVIEW]Sara Goering - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):125-135.
    In this paper, I look at several examples that demonstrate what I see as a troubling tendency in much of mainstream bioethics to discount the views of disabled people. Following feminist political theorists who argue in favour of a stance of humility and sensitive inclusion for people who have been marginalized, I recommend that bioethicists adopt a presumption in favour of believing rather than discounting the claims of disabled people. By taking their claims at face value and engaging with disabled (...)
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  41. Response.Miriam Gomez - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):375-376.
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  42. The Tasks of Embodied Love: Moral Problems in Caring for Children with Disabilities.Roger S. Gottlieb - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):225 - 236.
    Neither secular moral theory nor religious ethics have had much place for persons in need of constant physical help and cognitive support, nor for those who provide care for them. Writing as the father of a fourteen-year-old daughter with multiple disabilities, I will explore some of moral issues that arise here, both from the point of view of the disabled child and from that of the child's caretaker(s).
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  43. A Sex Police for Adults with "Mental Retardation"? Comment on Spiecker and Steutel.Stephen Greenspan - 2002 - Journal of Moral Education 31 (2):171-179.
    This article is a rebuttal of the claim by Spiecker and Steutel that sex between people with mild and moderate "mental retardation" is morally permissable only with the substitutive consent of caregivers. After a review of historical, empirical and practical considerations, an ethical analysis is undertaken which concludes that Spiecker and Steutel's arguments are deeply flawed and their proposed policy morally objectionable.
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  44. New Conversations in Feminist Disability Studies: Feminism, Philosophy, and Borders.Kim Q. Hall - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):1-12.
  45. Feminist Disability Studies.Kim Q. Hall (ed.) - 2011 - Indiana University Press.
    Disability, like questions of race, gender, and class, is one of the most provocative topics among theorists and philosophers today. This volume, situated at the intersection of feminist theory and disability studies, addresses questions about the nature of embodiment, the meaning of disability, the impact of public policy on those who have been labeled disabled, and how we define the norms of mental and physical ability. The essays here bridge the gap between theory and activism by illuminating structures of power (...)
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  46. Reimaging Disability and Gender Through Feminist Studies: An Introduction.Kim Q. Hall - 2011 - In Feminist Disability Studies. Indiana University Press. pp. 1--10.
  47. Reimagining Disability and Gender Through Feminist Disability Studies.Kim Q. Hall - 2011 - In Feminist Disability Studies. Indiana University Press. pp. 1--10.
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  48. Queerness, Disability, And.Kim Q. Hall - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1).
    : This paper questions the connection between vaginas and feminist embodiment in The Vagina Monologues and considers how the text both challenges and reinscribes (albeit unintentionally) systems of patriarchy, compulsory heterosexuality, and ableism. I use the Intersex Society of North America's critique as a point of departure and argue that the text offers theorists and activists in feminist, queer, and disability communities an opportunity to understand how power operates in both dominant discourses that degrade vaginas and strategies of feminist resistance (...)
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  49. Queerness, Disability, and The Vagina Monologues.Kim Q. Hall - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):99-119.
    This paper questions the connection between vaginas and feminist embodiment in The Vagina Monologues and considers how the text both challenges and reinscribes systems of patriarchy, compulsory heterosexuality, and ableism. I use the Intersex Society of North America's critique as a point of departure and argue that the text offers theorists and activists in feminist, queer, and disability communities an opportunity to understand how power operates in both dominant discourses that degrade vaginas and strategies of feminist resistance that seek to (...)
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  50. Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror.Melinda Hall - 2016 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 36 (1).
    Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror genre, which typically (...)
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