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1 — 50 / 159
  1. added 2020-05-16
    Em“Body”Ment and Disability: On Taking the “Body” Out of Em“Body”Ment.Julie E. Maybee - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):297-320.
  2. added 2020-05-10
    Oppressive Things.Shen‐yi Liao & Bryce Huebner - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    In analyzing oppressive systems like racism, social theorists have articulated accounts of the dynamic interaction and mutual dependence between psychological components, such as individuals’ patterns of thought and action, and social components, such as formal institutions and informal interactions. We argue for the further inclusion of physical components, such as material artifacts and spatial environments. Drawing on socially situated and ecologically embedded approaches in the cognitive sciences, we argue that physical components of racism are not only shaped by, but also (...)
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  3. added 2020-02-12
    One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal.Shelley Tremain - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):181-184.
  4. added 2020-02-12
    Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions. Edited by Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. New York: Routledge, 2000.Joan Callahan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  5. added 2019-12-18
    Depression’s Threat to Self-Governance.August Gorman - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (2):277-297.
    Much of the literature on impairment to self-governance focuses on cases in which a person either lacks the ability to protect herself from errant urges or cases in which a person lacks the capacity to initiate self-reflective agential processes. This has led to frameworks for thinking about self-governance designed with only the possibility of these sorts of impairments in mind. I challenge this orthodoxy using the case of melancholic depression to show that there is a third way that self-governance can (...)
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  6. added 2019-12-13
    Towards Including End-Users in the Design of Prosthetic Hands: Ethical Analysis of Survey of Australians with Upper-Limb Difference.Mary Jean Walker, Eliza Goddard, Benjamin Stephens-Fripp & Gursel Alici - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics (2):1-27.
    Advances in prosthetic design should benefit people with limb difference. But empirical evidence demonstrates a lack of uptake of prosthetics among those with limb difference, including of advanced designs. Non-use is often framed as a problem of prosthetic design or a user’s response to prosthetics. Few studies investigate user experience and preferences, and those that do tend to address satisfaction or dissatisfaction with functional aspects of particular designs. This results in limited data to improve designs and, we argue, this is (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Manufacturing Disability: HIV, Women and the Construction of Difference: Original Article.Marilou Gagnon - 2009 - Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):42-52.
    In 1998, the US Supreme Court first held that asymptomatic HIV infection constituted a disability when it ruled on the case of Bragdon v. Abbott. The use of yet another label to identify women living with HIV has been rarely questioned. While we do value the use of this label as an anti-discriminatory strategy, we believe that there is a need to examine how language and more specifically, the use of words such as disability, limitation, and impairment may create new (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Susan Wendell, The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability. [REVIEW]Renée Lorraine - 1997 - Philosophy in Review 17:149-151.
  9. added 2019-06-05
    Infertility in the Developing World: The Combined Role for Feminists and Disability Rights Proponents.Kavita Shah & Frances Batzer - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):109-125.
    Many of the millions of women in the developed world who experience infertility have difficulty coping with its psychological and social consequences, as well as attaining a resolution to these potentially devastating effects. Nevertheless, these women enjoy a relative benefit vis-à-vis infertile women in the developing world insofar as they live in a society that does not force them out of their own houses, curse at them in the streets, or condemn them to a life of poverty and destitution due (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-05
    The Right-to-Die Exception: How the Discourse of Individual Rights Impoverishes Bioethical Discussions of Disability and What We Can Do About It.Margaret P. Wardlaw - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):43-62.
    "Tell the health professionals why people with disabilities get depressed and suicidal. Tell them about institutions. Let them know the real reasons people with disabilities give up."The disability studies perspective has been consistently marginalized in twentieth-century American bioethical discourse. Like Ralph Ellison's nameless protagonist who is "invisible … simply because people refuse to see me" (Ellison 1995, 3), both disabled people and disability studies perspectives have been conspicuously absent from mainstream contemporary bioethical inquiries. Considerations of provision, accommodation, and institutionalization have (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-05
    Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  12. added 2019-06-05
    The Complex Balancing Act of Choice, Autonomy, Valued Life, and Rights: Bringing a Feminist Disability Perspective to Bioethics.Helen Meekosha - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):1-8.
    Disabled women were absent for many years from the discipline that has become known as women and gender studies. This field of study had its origins in the late 1970s following the second wave of feminism. In the latter decades of the twentieth century, disabled women and their allies introduced the necessary task of exploring disabled women's embodiment to the wider feminist community. A wealth of research now exists that incorporates disabled women's bodies into a range of disciplines: from literature, (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-05
    Hidden Labor: Disabled/Nondisabled Encounters, Agency, and Autonomy.Jackie Leach Scully - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):25-42.
    When I used to walk all the time, and especially before I started using a stick, I found most people acted at best as if I was not there, and at worst as if I was a drunk who deserved all I got.… [They] found it particularly hard to deal with my speech impairment, especially if they met me when I was sitting down, and hence had no prior warning … they would go red, look away or sometimes even walk (...)
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  14. added 2019-03-19
    Introduction to Cognitive Disability and Its Challenge to Moral Philosophy.Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (5):449-451.
  15. added 2019-02-01
    Book Review of The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability by Elizabeth Barnes. [REVIEW]Sara Protasi - 2017 - European Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):892-894.
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  16. added 2019-01-30
    The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability, by Elizabeth Barnes: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, Pp. Xxii + 200, £25. [REVIEW]Shelley Tremain - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):203-203.
  17. added 2019-01-15
    Dangerous Discourses of Disability, Subjectivity and Sexuality by Margrit Shildrick. [REVIEW]Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (1):162-167.
    [Excerpt]: In the nonideal world against which philosophical ideas and ideals are tried, suffering is distributed unequally. A central, if not defining, question for many late-twentieth-century feminist ethicists is how and why so many forms of suffering are distributed by virtue of bodily difference. For over four decades, disability studies, a multidisciplinary field spanning the humanities and social sciences, has principally revolved around a basic question: is the concept of "disability" constructed like "race," "gender," or "sexuality"? In other words, is (...)
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  18. added 2018-09-13
    Disabled Bodies and Norms of Flourishing in the Human Engineering Debate.Tom Sparrow - 2018 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 11 (2):36-62.
    The debate over human genetic engineering and enhancement has evolved to the point where dismissive critics have yielded some ground to proponents of engineering programs and their vision of our posthuman future. This is not to say that either human engineering programs or posthumanism has become mainstream but that we have reached a point in history where it is not genetic engineering that conjures dystopian futures in our moral imaginations but the absence of human genetic enhancement. As Ingmar Persson and (...)
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  19. added 2018-08-06
    Feminist Philosophy of Disability: A Genealogical Intervention.Shelley L. Tremain - 2019 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):132-158.
    This article is a feminist intervention into the ways that disability is researched and represented in philosophy at present. Nevertheless, some of the claims that I make over the course of the article are also pertinent to the marginalization in philosophy of other areas of inquiry, including philosophy of race, feminist philosophy more broadly, indigenous philosophies, and LGBTQI philosophy. Although the discipline of philosophy largely continues to operate under the guise of neutrality, rationality, and objectivity, the institutionalized structure of the (...)
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  20. added 2018-06-08
    Critical Notice of "The Rejected Body". [REVIEW]Christine Overall - 1998 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):435-452.
  21. added 2018-03-02
    Revisiting Feminist Matters in the Post-Linguistic Turn: John Dewey, New Materialisms, and Contemporary Feminist Thought.Clara Fischer - 2018 - In Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.), New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment. London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 83-102.
    In this chapter, I sketch some recent developments in feminist thought and present these alongside John Dewey’s work to assess what place pragmatism might assume in debates on contemporary, post-linguistic turn feminism. My task for this chapter is threefold: I redress the elision of pragmatism in the conversation around affect theory, new materialisms, and contemporary feminist theorising; I trace some of the confluences between Dewey’s work on nature and materiality, and the new materialist work of Stacy Alaimo and Karen Barad; (...)
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  22. added 2018-02-17
    Queerness, Disability, and The Vagina Monologues.Kim Q. Hall - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):99-119.
    This paper questions the connection between vaginas and feminist embodiment in The Vagina Monologues and considers how the text both challenges and reinscribes systems of patriarchy, compulsory heterosexuality, and ableism. I use the Intersex Society of North America's critique as a point of departure and argue that the text offers theorists and activists in feminist, queer, and disability communities an opportunity to understand how power operates in both dominant discourses that degrade vaginas and strategies of feminist resistance that seek to (...)
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  23. added 2018-02-17
    Love's LaborRevisited.Eva Kittay - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):237-250.
    Love's Labor explores the relations that dependency work fosters between women and between men and women, and argues that dependency is not exceptional but integral to human life. The commentaries point to more facets of dependency such as the importance (and limitation) of personal narrative in philosophizing dependency (Ruddick); the role of spirituality that Gottlieb addresses with regard to his disabled daughter; and the application of the theory to the situation of elderly women (Tong).
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  24. added 2018-02-17
    Book Review: Leslie Pickering Francis and Anita Silvers. Americans with Disabilities: Exploring Implications of the Law for Individuals and Institutions New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW]Joan Callahan - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):147-155.
  25. added 2018-01-26
    Feminist Perspectives on Disability.Alexa Schriempf - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):251-253.
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  26. added 2018-01-10
    Feminism and Disability.Joel Michael Reynolds & Anita Silvers - 2017 - In Carol Hay (ed.), Philosophy: Feminism. Macmillan Reference USA. pp. 295-316.
    The article introduces readers to the study of disability, both with respect to the interdisciplinary field of disability studies and the field of philosophy of disability. We then offer an overview of three central areas of philosophical inquiry where feminist work in philosophy and disability has made significant contributions: (1) metaphysics and ontology, (2) epistemology and phenomenology, and (3) ethical, social, and political philosophy.
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  27. added 2018-01-09
    Being Better Bodies. [REVIEW]Joel Michael Reynolds - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (6):46-47.
    [Excerpt]: Bioethics has an uneasy relationship with embodiment. Only with vigilance does knowledge of the body as it is lived counterbalance the momentous inertia of knowledge of the body as an object brought about by modern medical sciences. As a field tethered to detached, technical ways of knowing the world, bioethics must toil to treat the body as more than mere material and machine. To be more is, among other things, to be social—to live in the thickets of interdependence and (...)
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  28. added 2017-08-06
    Beauty as Pride: A Function of Agency.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 10 (2):5-9.
    This is basically a paper about artistic evaluation and how multiple interpretations can give rise to inconsistent and conflicting meanings. Images like Joel-Peter Witkin’s First Casting for Milo (2004) challenge the viewer to look closely, understand the formal properties at work, and then extract a meaning that ultimately asks, Is the model exploited or empowered? Is Karen Duffy, pictured here, vulnerable and “enfreaked” or is she potentially subversive, transgressive, and perhaps self-empowered? I will offer an argument in agreement with artist/author/ (...)
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  29. added 2017-07-14
    Parents and Children: An Alternative to Selfless and Unconditional Love.Amy Mullin - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):181-200.
    I develop a model of love or care between children and their parents guided by experiences of parents, especially mothers, with disabilities. On this model, a caring relationship requires both parties to be aware of each other as a particular person and it requires reciprocity. This does not mean that children need to be able to articulate their interests, or that they need to be self-reflectively aware of their parents’ interests or personhood. Instead, parents and children manifest their understanding of (...)
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  30. added 2017-07-14
    Review of A Question of David: A Disabled Mother's Journey Through Adoption. [REVIEW]Shelley M. Park - 2003 - Journal of the Association for Research on Mothering 5 (2):202-204.
  31. added 2017-03-26
    Justifying an Adequate Response to the Vulnerable Other.Kavanagh Chandra - 2016 - Ramon Llull Journal of Applied Ethics 7 (7):57-70.
    Is it possible to justify requiring that I respond adequately to the other’s vulnerability? I contend that insofar as I value my own personal identity it is consistent to respond adequately to the vulnerability of the other. Part one provides a break down of vulnerability in terms of its fundamental indeterminacy. Part two illustrates how the ability to respond either adequately or inadequately to the other’s vulnerability is implied by the fundamental co-constitution of personal identity. I understand myself as a (...)
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  32. added 2017-03-25
    Philosophy and the Apparatus of Disability.Shelley Tremain - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & David Wasserman (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Disability. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Abstract and Keywords Mainstream philosophers take for granted that disability is a prediscursive, transcultural, and transhistorical disadvantage, an objective human defect or characteristic that ought to be prevented, corrected, eliminated, or cured. That these assumptions are contestable, that it might be the case that disability is a historically and culturally specific, contingent social phenomenon, a complex apparatus of power, rather than a natural attribute or property that certain people possess, is not considered, let alone seriously entertained. This chapter draws on (...)
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  33. added 2017-02-15
    The Case of the Missing Hand: Gender, Disability, and Bodily Norms in Selective Termination.Catherine Mills - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):82-96.
    The practice of terminating a pregnancy following the diagnosis of a fetal abnormality raises questions about notions of bodily normality and the ways these shape ethical decision-making. This is particularly the case with terminations done on the basis of ostensibly minor morphological anomalies, such as cleft lip and isolated malformations of the limbs or digits. In this paper, I examine a recent case of selective termination after a morphology ultrasound scan revealed the fetus to be missing a hand . Using (...)
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  34. added 2017-02-12
    So Long as They Grow Out of It: Comics, The Discourse of Developmental Normalcy, and Disability. [REVIEW]Susan M. Squier - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (2):71-88.
    This essay draws on two emerging fields—the study of comics or graphic fiction, and disability studies—to demonstrate how graphic fictions articulate the embodied, ethical, and sociopolitical experiences of impairment and disability. Examining David B’s Epileptic and Paul Karasik and Judy Karasik’s The Ride Together, I argue that these graphic novels unsettle conventional notions of normalcy and disability. In so doing, they also challenge our assumed dimensions and possibilities of the comics genre and medium, demonstrating the great potential comics hold for (...)
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  35. added 2017-02-11
    A Disabled Gunner.Louis Paul - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (3):4-4.
  36. added 2017-01-29
    Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights.Mary Briody Mahowald - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (3):216-221.
  37. added 2017-01-27
    The Post‐Raciality and Post‐Spatiality of Calls for LGBTQ and Disability Visibility.Carly Thomsen - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):149-166.
    In this article, I consider the ideologies that emerge when disability and LGBTQ rights advocates' ubiquitous calls for visibility collide. I argue that contemporary visibility politics encourage the production of post-racial and post-spatial ideologies. In demanding visibility, disability and LGBTQ rights advocates ignore, ironically, visible markers of difference and assume that being “out, loud, and proud” is desirable trans-geographically. I bring together disability studies and queer rural studies—fields that have engaged in remarkably little dialogue—to analyze activist calls for LGBTQ and (...)
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  38. added 2017-01-27
    The Discourse of Pathology: Reproducing the Able Mind Through Bodies of Color.Ashley Taylor - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):181-198.
    The growing field of feminist disability studies explores how human bodies are interpreted through cultural values and expectations surrounding physical and mental ability. This paper contributes to and expands upon this conversation by examining how the ideal of “able-mindedness” functions to maintain racial divisions and inequalities through attributions of cognitive and psychiatric disability to bodies of color. Drawing upon contemporary examples from popular social media, public policy, and academic discourse, the author shows how racialized and nonnormatively gendered bodies are identified (...)
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  39. added 2017-01-27
    Distending Straight‐Masculine Time: A Phenomenology of the Disabled Speaking Body.Joshua St Pierre - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):49-65.
    Drawing upon feminist, queer, and crip phenomenology, this essay argues that the distinct temporality of the lived, stuttering body disturbs the normalized “choreography” of communication and thereby threatens the disabled speaker's recognition as a speaking subject. Examined through the phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alfred Schutz, the disabled speaking body is temporally “out of step” with the normalized bodily rhythms and pace of communicative practices in relation to both lived and objective time. Disciplined for his incalculable and therefore irrational bodily (...)
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  40. added 2017-01-27
    Disability Studies Gets Fat.Anna Mollow - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):199-216.
    This article invites disability scholars to “get fat,” that is, to support the goals of the fat justice movement. I argue that the contemporary politics of fatness can productively be read through the lens of disability studies’ social model. At the same time, I mobilize feminist critiques of the social model to push fat disability studies toward a more in-depth engagement with the topics of health and illness. Additionally, I contend that feminist scholars’ accounts of our personal relationships to fatness (...)
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  41. added 2017-01-27
    The Bodymind Problem and the Possibilities of Pain.Margaret Price - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):268-284.
    What is a crip politics of bodymind? Drawing upon Rosemarie Garland-Thomson's theory of the misfit, I explain my understanding of crip and bodymind within a feminist materialist framework, and argue that careful investigation of a crip politics of bodymind must involve accounting for two key, but under-explored, disability studies concepts: desire and pain. I trace the turn toward desire that has characterized DS theory for the last decade, and argue that while acknowledging disability desire, we must also attend to the (...)
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  42. added 2017-01-27
    New Conversations in Feminist Disability Studies: Feminism, Philosophy, and Borders.Kim Q. Hall - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (1):1-12.
  43. added 2017-01-26
    [Book Review] the Rejected Body, Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability. [REVIEW]Wendell Susan - 1998 - In Stephen Everson (ed.), Ethics. Cambridge University Press. pp. 108--3.
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  44. added 2017-01-24
    Queer/Fear: Disability, Sexuality, and The Other. [REVIEW]Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):139-147.
    This paper examines the relationship between disability and “queerness.” I argue that the hostility frequently expressed against both disabled and queer individuals is a function of fear of the undecidability of the body. I draw on feminist, queer, and disability theory to help us understand this phenomenon and suggest that these different kinds of theories have a complementary relationship. That is, feminist and queer theory help us see how this fear works, disability theory helps us see why it exists.
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  45. added 2017-01-24
    Toward a Full-Inclusion Feminism: A Feminist Deployment of Disability Analysis.Judy Rohrer - 2005 - Feminist Studies 31 (1):34-63.
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  46. added 2017-01-22
    Doing Ethics From Experience: Pragmatic Suggestions for a Feminist Disability Advocate's Response to Prenatal Diagnosis. Stramondo - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):48-78.
    I have been acutely aware, too much so, doubtless, of a tendency of other thinkers and writers to achieve a specious lucidity and simplicity by the mere process of ignoring considerations which a greater respect for the concrete materials of experience would have forced upon them. In her chapter of Disability, Difference, and Discrimination titled “A Feminist Standpoint,” Mary Mahowald looks to feminist standpoint epistemology as a method for identifying, voicing, and mitigating the ways in which people with disabilities are (...)
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  47. added 2017-01-21
    Response.Miriam Taylor Gomez - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):375-376.
  48. added 2017-01-17
    Feminist Approaches to Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (10):541-553.
    This essay explores various philosophical approaches to cognitive disability within feminist philosophy. In doing so, it addresses three broad questions: What positive contributions can feminist philosophy make to the philosophy of cognitive disability? How have feminist philosophers critiqued the presence and absence of cognitive disability in philosophy? And what challenges does cognitive disability pose to feminist philosophy itself? The essay begins with definitions and models of disability and then turns to feminist work on cognitive disability in moral and political philosophy, (...)
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  49. added 2017-01-16
    The Pain of Endo Existence: Toward a Feminist Disability Studies Reading of Endometriosis.Cara E. Jones - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (3):554-571.
    Disability scholars have critiqued medical models that pathologize disability as an individual flaw that needs treatment, rehabilitation, and cure, favoring instead a social-constructionist approach that likens disability to other identity categories such as gender, race, class, and sexuality. However, the emphasis on social constructionism has left chronic illness and pain largely untheorized. This article argues that feminist disability studies must attend to the common, chronic gynecological condition endometriosis when theorizing pain. Endo is particularly important for FDS analysis because the highly (...)
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  50. added 2017-01-15
    Vital Wheels: Disability, Relationality, and the Queer Animacy of Vibrant Things.Julia Watts Belser - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (1):5-21.
    This article probes the philosophical and political significance of the relationships between wheelchair activists and their wheelchairs. Analyzing disability memoirs and the work of a professional wheelchair dancer, I argue that wheelers frequently experience complex relationality and queer kinships with their wheels. By bringing the artistry of disabled writers and dancers into conversation with the notions of human–material relations in the work of Donna Haraway, Jane Bennett, Stacy Alaimo, and Mel Chen, I show how alternative animacies shape wheelers’ conceptions of (...)
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1 — 50 / 159