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  1. Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice, And: Policing the National Body: Race, Gender, and Criminalization, And: Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide (Review).Sarah Lucia Hoagland - forthcoming - Hypatia 22 (2):182-188.
    Review (2007) of three books fighting violence against women of color. Organizers and activists all, the theorists of these volumes provide comprehensive analyses as well as strategies exploring the struggle for reproductive justice for women of color, policing the national body and criminalization, and American Indian genocide as related to sexual violence and colonial relationships. The arguments highlight once again the inseparability of theory and practice. The focus hope is to bring mainstream feminism back to its struggle for social justice.
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  2. Women of Color Structural Feminisms.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Shirley-Anne Tate (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook on Critical Race And Gender.
    One way to track the many critical impacts of women of color feminisms is through the powerful structural analyses of gendered and racialized oppression they offer. This article discusses diverse lineages of women of color feminisms in the global South that tackle systemic structures of power and domination from their situated perspectives. It offers an introduction to structuralist theories in the humanities and differentiates them from women of color feminist theorizing, which begins analyses of structures from embodied and phenomenological st¬¬andpoints--with (...)
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  3. Between Hermeneutic Violence and Alphabets of Survival.Elena Ruíz - forthcoming - In Andrea Pitts, Mariana Ortega & José Medina (eds.), Theories of the Flesh: Latinx and Latin American Feminisms, Transformation, and Resistance. Oxford University Press.
  4. Decolonizing Universalism: A Transnational Feminist Ethic.Serene J. Khader - 2019 - Oup Usa.
    Decolonizing Universalism develops a genuinely anti-imperialist feminism. Against relativism/universalism debates that ask feminists to either reject normativity or reduce feminism to a Western conceit, Khader's nonideal universalism rediscovers the normative core of feminism in opposition to sexist oppression and reimagines the role of moral ideals in transnational feminist praxis.
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  5. Complicit Sisters: Gender and Women’s Issues Across North-South Divides, by Sara de Jong. [REVIEW]Marie-Pier Lemay - 2019 - International Feminist Journal of Politics 1:159-161.
    Book review of Complicit Sisters: Gender and Women’s Issues across North-South Divides, by Sara de Jong.
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  6. A Feminist Engagement with Forst's Transnational Justice.Sarah Miller - 2019 - In Amy Allen & Eduardo Mendieta (eds.), Justification and Emancipation: The Political Philosophy of Rainer Forst. University Park: pp. 125-144.
    This article offers a feminist engagement with and evaluation of Rainer Forst’s concept of transnational justice, especially as he articulates it in his most recent book, Normativity and Power: Analyzing Social Orders of Justification. While focusing on this book, the analysis I offer also builds on his earlier writings on a critical theory of transnational justice and the concept of the right to justification. Feminist theoretical resources, including current transnational feminist theory, provide a series of lenses that bring into focus (...)
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  7. Feminist Perspectives on Globalization.Serena Parekh & Shelley Wilcox - 2018 - The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In its broadest sense, globalization refers to the economic, social, cultural, and political processes of integration that result from the expansion of transnational economic production, migration, communications, and technologies. This article outlines the ways in which predominantly Western feminist philosophers have articulated and addressed the challenges associated with its economic and political dimensions.
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  8. On the Politics of Coalition.Elena Ruíz & Kristie Dotson - 2017 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 3 (2):1-16.
    In the wake of continued structural asymmetries between women of color and white feminisms, this essay revisits intersectional tensions in Catharine MacKinnon’s Toward a Feminist Theory of the State while exploring productive spaces of coalition. To explore such spaces, we reframe Toward a Feminist Theory of the State in terms of its epistemological project and highlight possible synchronicities with liberational features in women-of-color feminisms. This is done, in part, through an analysis of the philosophical role “method” plays in MacKinnon’s argument, (...)
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  9. Wollstonecraft, Mill, and Women's Human Rights.Eileen Hunt Botting - 2016 - Yale University Press.
    How can women’s rights be seen as a universal value rather than a Western value imposed upon the rest of the world? Addressing this question, Eileen Hunt Botting offers the first comparative study of writings by Mary Wollstonecraft and John Stuart Mill. Although Wollstonecraft and Mill were the primary philosophical architects of the view that women’s rights are human rights, Botting shows how non-Western thinkers have revised and internationalized their original theories since the nineteenth century. Botting explains why this revised (...)
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  10. “Care Drain”. Explaining Bias in Theorizing Women’s Migration.Speranta Dumitru - 2016 - Romanian Journal of Society and Politics 11 (2):7-24.
    Migrant women are often stereotyped. Some scholars associate the feminization of migration with domestic work and criticize the “care drain” as a new form of imperialism that the First World imposes on the Third World. However, migrant women employed as domestic workers in Northern America and Europe represent only 2% of migrant women worldwide and cannot be seen as characterizing the “feminization of migration”. Why are migrant domestic workers overestimated? This paper explores two possible sources of bias. The first is (...)
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  11. Individual and Community Identity in Food Sovereignty: The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Translating a Rural Social Movement.Werkheiser Ian - 2016 - In Mary Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Oxford, UK: Routledge. pp. 377-387.
  12. Gender Justice and Statistics.Scott Wisor - 2016 - In Kim Rubenstein & Katharine Young (eds.), The Public Law of Gender: From the Local to the Global. Cambridge University Press.
    The last two decades have seen a welcome proliferation of the collection and dissemination of data on social progress, as well as considered public debates rethinking existing standards of measuring the progress of societies. These efforts are to be welcomed. However, they are only a nascent step on a longer road to the improved measurement of social progress. In this paper, I focus on the central role that gender should take in future efforts to measure progress in securing human rights, (...)
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  13. Beyond Autonomy Fetishism.Serene J. Khader - 2015 - Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 17.
  14. Food Sovereignty and Gender Justice.Mark Navin - 2015 - In J. M. Dieterle (ed.), Just Food: Philosophy, Justice and Food. pp. 87-100.
    Leaders of the world’s largest food sovereignty movement, La Vía Campesina, have argued that gender justice is a core component of food justice. On their view, food justice requires an end to violence against women and a guarantee of women’s equal social and political status. However, some have wondered what gender justice has to do with food. In particular, they have worried that La Vía Campesina’s embrace of radical gender egalitarianism cannot be grounded in food-related concerns. My goal in this (...)
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  15. Challenges of Local and Global Misogyny.Claudia Card - 2014 - In Jon Mandle & David Reidy (eds.), A Companion to Rawls. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell. pp. 472-486.
    Rawls saw need for non-ideal theory also within society but never developed that project. In this chapter, Card suggests that the non-ideal part of Rawls’ Law of Peoples can be a resource for thinking about responding to evils when the subject is not state-centered. It is plausible that defense against great evils other than those of aggressive states should be governed by analogues of scruples that Rawlsian well-ordered societies observe in defending themselves against outlaw states. This essay explores those hypotheses (...)
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  16. Climate Change, Buen Vivir, and the Dialectic of Enlightenment: Toward a Feminist Critical Philosophy of Climate Justice.Regina Cochrane - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (3):576-598.
    This paper examines the proposal that the indigenous cosmovision of buen vivir (good living)—the “organizing principle” of Ecuador's 2008 and Bolivia's 2009 constitutional reforms—constitutes an appropriate basis for responding to climate change. Advocates of this approach blame climate change on a “civilizational crisis” that is fundamentally a crisis of modern Enlightenment reason. Certain Latin American feminists and indigenous women, however, question the implications, for women, of any proposed “civilizational shift” seeking to reverse the human separation from nonhuman nature wrought via (...)
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  17. “Are My Hands Clean?” Responsibility for Global Gender Disparities.Alison M. Jaggar - 2014 - In Diana Meyers (ed.), Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.
    The World Bank’s World Development Report: Gender Equality and Development 2012 makes many recommendations for addressing the severe gender disparities that it finds persisting across much of the world. This paper proposes that the recommendations focus too exclusively on remedies at the national level while paying insufficient attention to transnational arrangements. The imbalance of the report’s analysis places too much responsibility for addressing the disparities on local and national actors, while underplaying the responsibilities of transnational actors, including the World Bank (...)
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  18. Adaptive Preferences and Women's Empowerment. By SERENE J. KHADER. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.Asha Bhandary - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):390-393.
  19. Women and Human Rights in South Sudan.Jane Kani Edward - 2013 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 10 (1):91-115.
  20. Care Drain as an Issue of Global Gender Justice.Anca Gheaus - 2013 - Ethical Perspectives 20 (1).
    The gendered division of labour in combination with the feminisation of international migration contribute to shortages of care, a phenomenon often called ‘care drain’. I argue that this phenomenon is an issue of global gender justice. I look at two methodological challenges and favourably analyse the suggestions that care drain studies should include the effects of fathers’ and other male caregivers’ migration and, in some cases, the effects of migration within national borders. I also explain why care drain is a (...)
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  21. Care Drain: Who Should Provide for the Children Left Behind?Anca Gheaus - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (1):1-23.
    Care drain brings the traditional problem of carers' choice between paid work and family at a new level. Taking care drain from Romania as a case study, I analyse the consequences of parents' migration within a normative framework committed to meeting the needs of vulnerable individuals. The temporary migration of parents who cannot take their children with them involves moral harm, particularly the frustration of children's developmental and emotional needs. I use recent feminist work on justice and care in the (...)
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  22. Editor's Introduction: Gender and Global Justice: Rethinking Some Basic Assumptions of Western Political Philosophy.Alison M. Jaggar - 2013 - In Alison Jaggar (ed.), Gender and Global Justice. Polity. pp. 1-17.
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  23. Gender and Global Justice.Alison M. Jaggar (ed.) - 2013 - Polity.
    Issues of global justice have received increasing attention in academic philosophy in recent years but the gendered dimensions of these issues are often overlooked or treated as peripheral. This groundbreaking collection by Alison Jaggar brings gender to the centre of philosophical debates about global justice. -/- The explorations presented here range far beyond the limited range of issues often thought to constitute feminists’ concerns about global justice, such as female seclusion, genital cutting, and sex trafficking. Instead, established and emerging scholars (...)
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  24. We Fight for Roses Too: Time-Use and Global Gender Justice.Alison M. Jaggar - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (2):115 - 129.
    The World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development has recently confirmed the widely held belief that women across the world tend to perform different work from men who otherwise are situated similarly. Women also work longer hours than similarly situated men. In analyzing the justice of these gendered disparities in time-use, WDR 2012 uses a moral framework that is largely distributive. Although this framework illuminates some aspects of the injustice of the situation, I contend that it obscures other crucial (...)
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  25. Does Poverty Wear a Woman's Face? Some Moral Dimensions of a Transnational Feminist Research Project.Alison M. Jaggar - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):240-256.
    This article explains some moral dimensions of a transnational feminist research project designed to provide a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The author is an investigator on this project. Poverty metrics incorporate moral judgments about what is necessary for a decent life, so justifying metrics requires moral argumentation. The article clarifies the moral aspects of poverty valuation, indicates some moral flaws in existing global poverty metrics, and outlines some conditions for a better global metric. It (...)
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  26. Feminist Methodology in Practice: Lessons From a Research Program.Alison M. Jaggar & Scott Wisor - 2013 - In Alison Jaggar (ed.), Just Methods: An Interdisciplinary Reader. Paradigm.
    This article reflects critically on the methodology of one feminist research project which is ongoing as we write. The project is titled “Assessing Development: Designing Better Indices of Poverty and Gender Equity” and its aim is to develop a better standard or metric for measuring poverty across the world. The authors of this article are among several philosophers on the research team, which also includes scholars from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology and economics. This article begin by explaining why a (...)
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  27. The Body as the Place of Care.Eva Feder Kittay - 2013 - In Donald A. Landes & Azucena Cruz-Pierre (eds.), Exploring the Work of Edward S. Casey. Bloomsbury Publishing,.
  28. Introduction: Special Issue on Vulnerability and Empowerment.Eric Palmer - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (3):245-248.
    Introduction to collected papers. Journal of Global Ethics, Volume 9, Issue 3, Page 245-248, December 2013.
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  29. Making Feminist Sense of the Global Justice Movement. By Catherine Eschle and Bice Maiguashca Lanham., Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2010. [REVIEW]Katharine Schweitzer - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):388-390.
  30. Scales of Justice: Reimagining Political Space in a Global World. By Nancy Fraser. New York: Columbia University Press, 2009. [REVIEW]Jennifer Warriner - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (1):223-226.
  31. Gender Justice and Development: Local and Global.Cynthia Bisman & Christine Koggel - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):213-215.
  32. Empowerment, Citizenship and Gender Justice: A Contribution to Locally Grounded Theories of Change in Women's Lives.Naila Kabeer - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):216-232.
    Struggles for gender justice by women's movements have sought to give legal recognition to gender equality at both national and international levels. However, such society-wide goals may have little resonance in the lives of individual men and women in contexts where a culture of individual rights is weak or missing and the stress is on the moral economy of kinship and community. While empowerment captures the myriad ways in which intended and unintended changes can enhance the ability of individual women (...)
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  33. Gender Justice and Rights in Climate Change Adaptation: Opportunities and Pitfalls.Petra Tschakert & Mario Machado - 2012 - Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (3):275-289.
    We present three rights-based approaches to research and policies on gender justice and equity in the context of climate change adaptation. After a short introduction, we describe the dominant discourse that frames climate change and provide an overview of the literature that has depicted women both as vulnerable victims of climatic change and as active agents in adaptive responses. Discussion follows on the shift from gendered impacts to gendered adaptive capacities and embodied experiences, highlighting the continuing impact of social biases (...)
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  34. Visionary Pragmatism and an Ethics of Connectivity: An Alternative to the Autonomy Tradition in Analytic Ethics.Cynthia Willett - 2012 - In Maurice Hamington Celia N. Bardwell Jones (ed.), Contemporary Feminist Pragmatism. Routledge. pp. 258-287.
    In an era of global interdependence, the concept of autonomy may no longer name our core moral need. Shifting friendships and enmities across political boundaries bear significant consequences for the individual. Perhaps social alliances and hostilities have always had an impact on the flourishing of individuals and communities. But globalization (especially as viewed through the technology of the information age) magnifies the impact of external forces on sovereign bodies. These forces remind individuals of the need to establish the right kind (...)
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  35. The World Development Report 2012: A Review. [REVIEW]Scott Wisor - 2012 - Crop Poverty Brief.
    -/- The World Development Report 2012 "Gender Equality and Development" (GED), represents a new push to raise the profile of gender equality among a variety of official development actors. In this new CROP Poverty Brief Scott Wisor situates GED in the broader development context, discusses its key findings and some shortcomings and suggests how it should be used by advocates and allies concerned with eliminating gross gender injustice and global poverty.
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  36. Adaptive Preferences and Women’s Empowerment.Serene J. Khader - 2011 - Oup Usa.
  37. Beyond Inadvertent Ventriloquism: Caring Virtues for Anti‐Paternalist Development Practice.Serene J. Khader - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):742-761.
    I argue that the epistemological virtues of concrete thinking, self-transparency, and narrative understanding developed by care ethicists can help international development practitioners combat their own temptations to engage in “unconscious unjustified paternalism” (UUP). I develop the concept of UUP—a type of paternalism in which one party unjustifiably substitutes her judgment for another's because of difficulty distinguishing her desires for the other from the other's good. I show that the temptation to UUP is endemic to development and that care ethics contains (...)
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  38. Responsibility and Identity in Global Justice—Editor's Introduction.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):667-671.
  39. Are Women Human? And Other International Dialogues. By CATHARINE A. MACKINNON.Lani Roberts - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):123-126.
  40. Global Feminist Ethics. Edited by Rebecca Whisnant and Peggy Desautels. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2009. - Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non‐Ideal. Edited by Lisa Tessman. Dordrecht: Springer, 2009.Theresa W. Tobin - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):857-864.
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  41. Cosmopolitan Care.Sarah Clark Miller - 2010 - Ethics and Social Welfare 4 (2):145-157.
    I develop the foundation for cosmopolitan care, an underexplored variety of moral cosmopolitanism. I begin by offering a characterization of contemporary cosmopolitanism from the justice tradition. Rather than discussing the political, economic or cultural aspects of cosmopolitanism, I instead address its moral dimensions. I then employ a feminist philosophical perspective to provide a critical evaluation of the moral foundations of cosmopolitan justice, with an eye toward demonstrating the need for an alternative account of moral cosmopolitanism as cosmopolitan care. After providing (...)
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  42. ‘Take Your Rosaries Out of Our Ovaries:’ Women's Rights in Argentina and Bolivia.Caitlin Guse - 2010 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 1 (2).
    Despite being neighbouring countries, Bolivia and Argentina appear to be a world apart in terms of economics, international relations, and women’s rights. Historically, women’s rights have been fairly similar in both countries, but while one country seemingly made “progress,” the other country appeared to be stagnating. By exploring violence against women, and the current state of contraception and abortion laws it becomes apparent that “progress” does not necessarily bring about social change.
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  43. Poetic Justice: Why Sex-Slaves Should Be Allowed to Sue Ignorant Clients in Conversion. [REVIEW]Tsachi Keren-Paz - 2010 - Law and Philosophy 29 (3):307-336.
    In this article I argue that clients who purchase commercial sex from forced prostitutes should be strictly liable in tort towards the sex-slaves. Such an approach is both normatively defensible and doctrinally feasible. As I have argued elsewhere, fairness and equality demand that clients compensate sex-slaves even if one refuses to acknowledge that fault is involved in purchasing sex from a prostitute who might be forced. In this article I argue that such strict liability could be grounded in the tort (...)
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  44. Introduction: The Philosophical Challenges of Global Gender Justice.Alison M. Jaggar - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):1-15.
    The present issue of Philosophical Topics is devoted to global gender justice. In this introduction to the volume, I sketch the emergence of global gender justice as a field of philosophical inquiry and identify some of the philosophical challenges that its emergence raises. The easiest way to explain the distinctiveness of this field is to situate it in the context of earlier philosophical inquiries into justice.
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  45. The Moral Harm of Migrant Carework: Realizing a Global Right to Care.Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):53-73.
    Arlie Hochschild glosses the practice of women migrants in poor nations who leave their families behind for extended periods of time to do carework in other wealthier countries as a “global heart transplant” from poor to wealthy nations. Thus she signals the idea of an injustice between nations and a moral harm for the individuals in the practice. Yet the nature of the harm needs a clear articulation. When we posit a sufficiently nuanced “right to care,” we locate the harm (...)
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  46. Discourses of Sexual Violence in a Global Framework.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):123.
    In this paper I make a preliminary analysis of Western (or global North) discourses on sexual violence, focusing on the important concepts of “consent” and “victim.” The concept of “consent” is widely used to determine whether sexual violence has occurred, and it is the focal point of debates over the legitimacy of statutory offenses and over the way we characterize sex work done under conditions involving economic desperation. The concept of “victim” is shunned by many feminists and nonfeminists alike for (...)
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  47. Cross-Border Feminism: Shifting the Terms of Debate for Us and European Feminists.Shari Stone-Mediatore - 2009 - Journal of Global Ethics 5 (1):57 – 71.
    Recent decades of women's rights advocacy have produced numerous regional and international agreements for protecting women's security, including a UN convention that affirms the state's responsibility to protect key gender-specific rights, with no exceptions on the basis of culture or religion. At the same time, however, the focus on universal women's rights has enabled influential feminists in the United States to view women's rights in opposition to culture, and most often in opposition to other people's cultures. Not surprisingly, then, feminists (...)
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  48. Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice.Amy Allen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):156-172.
    In this paper, I examine Iris Marion Young's conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘oppression’ and ‘domination.’ Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. I conclude by considering one way in which (...)
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  49. What is Poverty?Peter Higgins, Audra King & April Shaw - 2008 - In Rebecca Whisnant & Peggy DesAutels (eds.), Global Feminist Ethics: Feminist Ethics and Social Theory. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Invoking three desiderata (empirical adequacy, conceptual precision, and sensitivity to social positioning), this paper argues that poverty is best understood as the deprivation of certain human capabilities. It defends this way of conceiving of poverty against standard alternatives: lack of income, lack of resources, inequality, and social exclusion.
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  50. Feminismo En El Mundo Global.Amelia Valcárcel Y. Bernaldo de Quirós - 2008 - Cátedra.
    En grandes números, la globalización beneficia a las mujeres. Pero no todo es de color de rosa: la falencia de los estados nacionales, los fundamentalismos y las deslocalizaciones perjudican. Globalizada no está la atención médica, porque todavía más de medio millón de mujeres mueren en el parto al año, pero sí lo está el tráfico y la trata, que trafican con mujeres desde cualquier parte del planeta para ponerlas a disposición allí donde paguen por usarlas. Digamos que la agenda feminista (...)
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