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  1. Ruth Abbey (1999). Back to the Future: Marriage as Friendship in the Thought of Mary Wollstonecraft. Hypatia 14 (3):78-95.
    : If liberal theory is to move forward, it must take the political nature of family relations seriously. The beginnings of such a liberalism appear in Mary Wollstonecraft's work. Wollstonecraft's depiction of the family as a fundamentally political institution extends liberal values into the private sphere by promoting the ideal of marriage as friendship. However, while her model of marriage diminishes arbitrary power in family relations, she seems unable to incorporate enduring sexual relations between married partners.
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  2. David M. Adams (2002). Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):254-256.
  3. Elizabeth Anderson (2004). Uses of Value Judgments in Science: A General Argument, with Lessons From a Case Study of Feminist Research on Divorce. Hypatia 19 (1):1-24.
    : The underdetermination argument establishes that scientists may use political values to guide inquiry, without providing criteria for distinguishing legitimate from illegitimate guidance. This paper supplies such criteria. Analysis of the confused arguments against value-laden science reveals the fundamental criterion of illegitimate guidance: when value judgments operate to drive inquiry to a predetermined conclusion. A case study of feminist research on divorce reveals numerous legitimate ways that values can guide science without violating this standard.
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  4. Kathleen Ashley (1995). Tales of the Marriage Bed From Medieval France. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):138-138.
  5. Kathleen Ashley (1995). Tales of the Marriage Bed From Medieval France .R. C. Famiglietti. Speculum 70 (1):138-138.
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  6. Mary Astell & Bridget Hill (1986). The First English Feminist Reflections Upon Marriage and Other Writings.
  7. Linda A. Bell (1989). Does Marriage Require a Head? Some Historical Arguments. Hypatia 4 (1):139 - 154.
    Are hierarchies necessary in human relationships? This issue is a central one for feminist theory, and there is a continuing need to rethink relationships and to envision what they might be like without any sort of dominance of some over others. To aid this process of envisioning alternatives, this paper examines more closely the way one of the most intimate of hierarchies - marriage - has been argued and envisioned historically.
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  8. Piers Benn (2014). The Gay Marriage Debate – Afterthoughts. Think 13 (36):23-31.
    This article analyses some familiar arguments both for, and against, same-sex civil marriage. I argue that it is not enough to defend gay marriage by a simple appeal to equality, unless one addresses the view that same-sex marriage would be contrary to the objective nature and purpose of marriage. I illustrate the ways in which a stand-off is reached in discussions of this particular matter. I also suggest that there is a mystery about what the from a faithful relationship to (...)
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  9. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    : This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  10. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
  11. Anne Bottomley & Simone Wong (2006). Special Issue: Domestic Partnerships: Stretching the Marriage Model? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):141-143.
  12. Elizabeth Brake (ed.) (2016). After Marriage: Rethinking Marital Relationships. Oxford University Press USA.
    In this collection, liberal and feminist philosophers debate whether marriage reform ought to stop with same-sex marriage. Some authors argue for abolishing marriage or for new legal forms such as polygamy or temporary marriage. Others argue that the liberal values justifying same-sex marriage do not entail further reform.
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  13. John Bugge (1998). Kindly Similitude: Marriage and Family in "Piers Plowman".M. Teresa Tavormina. Speculum 73 (1):272-275.
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  14. Robert L. Burgess (1994). The Family in a Changing World. Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and one form (...)
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  15. James F. Burke (2003). Kinship and Marriage in Medieval Hispanic Chivalric RomanceMichael Harney. Speculum 78 (2):512-514.
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  16. Joan Callahan (2009). Same-Sex Marriage: Why It Matters—At Least for Now. Hypatia 24 (1):70 - 80.
    This paper addresses the progressive, feminist critique of same-sex marriage as articulated by Claudia Card. Although agreeing with Card that the institution of marriage as we know it is profoundly morally flawed in its origins and effects, Callahan disagrees with Card's suggestion that queer activists in the United States should not be working for the inclusion of same-sex couples in the institution.
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  17. Joan Callahan (2009). Same-Sex Marriage: Why It Matters-At Least for Now. Hypatia 24 (1):70-80.
  18. Joan C. Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick (2007). Editors' Introduction to Writing Against Heterosexism. Hypatia 22 (1).
  19. V. J. Callan (1986). Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  20. Loren Cannon (2016). Firestonian Futures and Trans‐Affirming Presents. Hypatia 31 (2):229-244.
    Shulamith Firestone's Dialectic of Sex: The Case for Feminist Revolution was, upon its original publication, both radicacmen would be freed from the burden of childbirth, in which the nuclear family, gender roles, typical constructions of marriage and parenting are all a thing of the past, still for many seems radical, even forty-five years after its debut in 1970. With Firestone's recent passing, it is a particularly suitable time to reconsider her work in light of the medical, technological, and social changes (...)
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  21. Claudia Card (2007). Gay Divorce: Thoughts on the Legal Regulation of Marriage. Hypatia 22 (1):24-38.
    : Although the exclusion of LGBTs from the rites and rights of marriage is arbitrary and unjust, the legal institution of marriage is itself so riddled with injustice that it would be better to create alternative forms of durable intimate partnership that do not invoke the power of the state. Card's essay develops a case for this position, taking up an injustice sufficiently serious to constitute an evil: the sheltering of domestic violence.
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  22. Claudia Card (2007). Gay Divorce: Thoughts on the Legal Regulation of Marriage. Hypatia 22 (1):24-38.
  23. Claudia Card (1996). Against Marriage and Motherhood. Hypatia 11 (3):1 - 23.
    This essay argues that current advocacy of lesbian and gay rights to legal marriage and parenthood insufficiently criticizes both marriage and motherhood as they are currently practiced and structured by Northern legal institutions. Instead we would do better not to let the State define our intimate unions and parenting would be improved if the power presently concentrated in the hands of one or two guardians were diluted and distributed through an appropriately concerned community.
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  24. Lisa Cassidy (2001). That Many of Us Should Not Parent. Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
  25. Clare Chambers (2013). VII-The Marriage-Free State. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (2pt2):123-143.
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  26. Ezio Di Nucci (2016). IVF, Same-Sex Couples and the Value of Biological Ties. Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (12):784-787.
    Ought parents, in general, to value being biologically tied to their children? Is it important, in particular, that both parents be biologically tied to their children? I will address these fundamental questions by looking at a fairly new practice within IVF treatments, so-called IVF-with-ROPA ( Reception of Oocytes from Partner ), which allows lesbian couples to „share motherhood‟ with one partner providing the eggs while the other becomes pregnant. I believe that IVF-with-ROPA is, just like other IVF treatments, morally permissible; (...)
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  27. Peter J. Dolton (1982). The?Marriage Game?: An Assignment Problem with Indivisibilities. Theory and Decision 14 (4):373-389.
  28. Ann Ferguson (2012). “Romantic Couple Love, the Affective Economy, and a Socialist-Feminist Vision” Taking Socialism Seriously. New York: Lexington Booksx. In Anatole Anton Anton & Richard Schmitt (eds.), Taking Socialism Seriously. Lexington Books. pp. 67-84..
  29. Marilyn Friedman (1990). "They Lived Happily Ever After": Sommers on Women and Marriage. Journal of Social Philosophy 21 (2-3):57-58.
  30. Linda Georgianna (1999). Medieval Marriage: Literary Approaches, 1100-1300.Neil Cartlidge. Speculum 74 (1):138-140.
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  31. Ronald N. Giere (1973). History and Philosophy of Science: Intimate Relationship or Marriage of Convenience? [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 24 (3):282-297.
  32. Christina Hendricks, Comments for “Marriage and Morals,” Elizabeth Brake (U of Calgary) Summer Workshop on Feminist Philosophy, UBC, June 17-18, 2005. [REVIEW]
  33. Patrick D. Hopkins (2006). The Long Arc of Justice: Lesbian and Gay Marriage, Equality, and Rights (Review). Hypatia 22 (1):243-246.
  34. Rebekah Johnson (2013). Marriage and the Metaphysics of Bodily Union. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):288-312.
    One current line of argument against the legalization of same-sex marriage, advocated primarily by the New Natural Lawyers, is that marriage is a pre-political institution that has, as an essential element, a bodily union requirement. They argue that same-sex couples cannot realize bodily union in their sexual activities and thus cannot meet the structural requirements of marriage. Accordingly, they argue that the same-sex marriage debate must be framed as a debate about what marriage is, and not, as it was in (...)
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  35. Hanna E. Kassis, Henry Toledano, Abū ʿAbd Allāh Muḥammad al-Sijilmāsī & Abu Abd Allah Muhammad al-Sijilmasi (1985). Judicial Practice and Family Law in Morocco: The Chapter on Marriage From Sijilmāsī's Al-ʿAmal Al-MuṭlaqJudicial Practice and Family Law in Morocco: The Chapter on Marriage From Sijilmasi's Al-Amal Al-Mutlaq. Journal of the American Oriental Society 105 (1):160.
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  36. Stephan Levitt & K. M. Kapadia (1971). Marriage and Family in India. Journal of the American Oriental Society 91 (1):161.
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  37. Bonnie Mann (2007). Gay Marriage and the War on Terror. Hypatia 22 (1):247-251.
  38. Dzung Kieu Nguyen (2013). Postpatriarchy. Journal of Research in Gender Studies 3 (2):27-47.
    This article points out: “The combination of men and women in families is irrational.” Men and women are two different “species.” They only require sexual activities from each other, which are considered the less time-consuming activities during their lives. Sex must be treated as an enemy of marriage, due to its inferior and treacherous nature, and should not be included in marriage. Men and women should not live together in a family, since this institution must be understood as a permanent (...)
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  39. Kathryn Norlock (2010). Teaching “Against Marriage," or, "But, Professor, Marriage Isn't a Contract!". In Stephen Scales, Adam Potthast & Linda Oravecz (eds.), The Ethics of the Family. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-132.
    In this contribution, I advocate diminishing the vision of marriage as an isolated and perfectly free choice between two individuals in love, in order to unseat the extent to which students resist the view that marriage is, among other things, a social contract. I summarize views of Immanuel Kant and Claudia Card, then describe my class presentation of the social significance of marriage. I conclude that students at an individualistic and self-creating point in their lives can be under-appreciative of what (...)
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  40. Lina Papadaki (2010). Kantian Marriage and Beyond: Why It Is Worth Thinking About Kant on Marriage. Hypatia 25 (2):276-294.
    Kant has famously argued that monogamous marriage is the only relationship where sexual use can take place "without degrading humanity and breaking the moral laws." Kantian marriage, however, has been the target of fierce criticisms by contemporary things: it has been regarded as flawed and paradoncal, as being deeply at odds with feminism, and, at best, as plainly uninteresting. In this paper, I argue that Kantian marriage can indeed survive these criticisms. Finally, the paper advances the discussion beyond marriage. Drawing (...)
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  41. A. Compton Reeves (2007). Marriage, Sex, and Civic Culture in Late Medieval LondonShannon McSheffrey. Speculum 82 (3):736-738.
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  42. M. E. Robinson (1903). Marriage as an Economic Institution. International Journal of Ethics 13 (2):171-185.
  43. Mostafa Saadat (2008). Is Consanguineous Marriage Historically Encouraged? Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (1):153-154.
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  44. Lynne Segal (2002). Individualization; The End of Marriage? Individualism and Intimate Relations. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 112.
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  45. Michael M. Sheehan (1977). Marriage Litigation in Medieval EnglandR. H. Helmolz. Speculum 52 (4):983-987.
  46. Margaret Somerville (2011). Scholars Turn Their Minds to Marriage : The Jurisprudence of Marriage and Other Intimate Relationships [Book Review]. [REVIEW] Bioethics Research Notes 23 (3):44.
    Somerville, Margaret Review of: Scholars turn their minds to marriage : The jurisprudence of marriage and other intimate relationships, by Scott FitzGibbon, Lynn D. Wardle, and A. Scott Loveless, Buffalo, NY: William S. Hein and Co., 2010.
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  47. Aftab Alam Sthanadar, Alan H. Bittles & Muhammad Zahid (2016). Increasing Prevalence of Consanguineous Marriage Confirmed in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province, Pakistan. Journal of Biosocial Science 48 (3):418-420.
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  48. Brian T. Trainor (1992). The State, Marriage and Divorce. Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (2):135-148.
    ABSTRACT This essay advances several interrelated arguments concerning the proper role of the state with regard to marriage and divorce but my main contention is that ‘pure’no‐fault divorce laws are unjust—or, at least, they are unjust if marriage involves a genuinely contractual element, and there seems to be very little doubt that it does. Locke, Kant and Hegel are three eminent thinkers who are alike in viewing marriage as a contract and in the first two sections of the essay I (...)
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  49. Ralph Wedgwood (2012). Review: Elizabeth Brake, Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
    This is a review of Elizabeth Brake's book Minimizing Marriage: Marriage, Morality, and the Law (Oxford University Press, 2012).
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  50. Marjorie Weinzweig (1986). Should a Feminist Choose A Marriage-Like Relationship? Hypatia 1 (2):139 - 160.
    Is "living together" in a marriage-like relationship compatible with the feminist ideal of individual self-development? Paradoxically, while the structure and social-historical context of marriage-like relationships seems in fundamental conflict with the goal of autonomous self-development, the development of individuality also seems to be better fostered by living with a significant other in a committed relationship than by living alone. This paradox is resolved through the suggestion of a three-stage account of self-development: inauthenticity, autonomous being oneself, and autonomous being with others. (...)
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