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  1. Sister Species: Women, Animals and Social Justice.Carol J. Adams - 2011 - University of Illinois Press.
  2. Western Ethnocentrism and Perceptions of the Harem.Leila Ahmed - 1982 - Feminist Studies 8 (3):521.
  3. Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice.Amy Allen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 156-172.
    This paper examines Young’s conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete, in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘ oppression ’ and ‘domination’. Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. Allen concludes by considering one way in which Young’s analysis (...)
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  4. Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice.Amy Allen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):156-172.
    In this paper, I examine Iris Marion Young's conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘oppression’ and ‘domination.’ Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. I conclude by considering one way in which (...)
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  5. Power, Oppression and Gender.Judith Andre - 1985 - Social Theory and Practice 11 (1):107-122.
  6. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza.Gloria Anzaldúa - 1987 - Aunt Lute.
    Borderlands/La Frontera deals with the psychology of resistance to oppression. The possibility of resistance is revealed by perceiving the self in the process of being oppressed as another face of the self in the process of resisting oppression. The new mestiza consciousness is born from this interplay between oppression and resistance. Resistance is understood as social, collective activity, by adding to Anzaldúa's theory the distinction between the act and the process of resistance.
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  7. Sharpened Edge: Women of Color, Resistance, and Writing.Stephanie Athey (ed.) - 2003 - Praeger.
  8. In Praise of Clutter as a Necessary Part of The Feminist Perspective.Maryann Ayim - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (2):211-215.
    A comment on Susan Wendell's paper "Oppression and Victimization; Choice and Responsibility" that appeared in Hypatia 5(3).
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  9. Complicity.Harriet Baber - manuscript
    There appear to be at least two important disanalogies between the situation of women and that of racial and ethnic minorities whose members are generally regarded as paradigmatic victims of oppression. First, in the case of oppressed racial and ethnic minorities it is relatively easy to identify the oppressors and the policies which serve to keep the oppressed in their place; it is not so easy to determine who the oppressors of women are--surely men are not universally blameworthy--nor even to (...)
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  10. Privilege: Expanding on Marilyn Frye's Oppression.Alison Bailey - 1998 - Journal of Social Philosophy 29 (3):104-119.
    This essay serves as both a response and embellishment of Marilyn Frye's now classic essay " Oppression." It is meant to pick up where this essay left off and to make connections between oppression, as Frye defines it, and the privileges that result from institutional structures. This essay tries to clarify one meaning of privilege that is lost in philosophical discussions of injustice. I develop a distinction between unearned privileges and earned advantages. Clarifying the meaning of privilege as unearned structural (...)
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  11. Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  12. Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination.Sandra Bartky - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  13. Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays.Elizabeth Ann Bartlett - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  14. Women's Ways of Knowing: The Development of Self, Voice, and Mind.Mary Field Belenky, Blythe Mcvicker Clinchy, Nancy Rule Goldberger & Jill Mattuck Tarule - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (2):177-179.
  15. A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion.Macalester Bell - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
    In an effort to reclaim women's moral psychology, feminist philosophers have reevaluated several seemingly negative emotions such as anger, resentment, and bitterness. However, one negative emotion has yet to receive adequate attention from feminist philosophers: contempt. I argue that feminists should reconsider what role feelings of contempt for male oppressors and male-dominated institutions and practices should play in our lives. I begin by surveying four feminist defenses of the negative emotions. I then offer a brief sketch of the nature and (...)
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  16. A Woman's Scorn: Toward a Feminist Defense of Contempt as a Moral Emotion.Macalester Bell - 2000 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
  17. Analyzing Oppression. By ANN E. CUDD.Paul Benson - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):178-181.
  18. Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University.Paul Benson - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  19. Epistemic Exploitation.Nora Berenstain - 2016 - Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3 (22).
    Epistemic exploitation occurs when privileged persons compel marginalized persons to educate them about the nature of their oppression. I argue that epistemic exploitation is marked by unrecognized, uncompensated, emotionally taxing, coerced epistemic labor. The coercive and exploitative aspects of the phenomenon are exemplified by the unpaid nature of the educational labor and its associated opportunity costs, the double bind that marginalized persons must navigate when faced with the demand to educate, and the need for additional labor created by the default (...)
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  20. A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role.Sandrine Bergès - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  21. Mothers and Independent Citizens: Making Sense of Wollstonecraft's Supposed Essentialism.Sandrine Berges - 2013 - Philosophical Papers 42 (3):259 - 284.
    Mary Wollstonecraft argues that women must be independent citizens, but that they cannot be that unless they fulfill certain duties as mothers. This is problematic in a number of ways, as argued by Laura Brace in a 2000 article. However, I argue that if we understand Wollstonecraft's concept of independence in a republican, rather than a liberal context, and at the same time pay close attention to her discussion of motherhood, a feminist reading of Wollstonecraft is not only possible but (...)
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  22. Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest.Debra B. Bergoffen - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  23. Trans Identities and First-Person Authority.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2009 - In Laurie Shrage (ed.), You've Changed: Sex Reassignment and Personal Identity. Oxford University Press.
  24. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book-domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling-but it also (...)
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  25. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  26. Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW]Belinda Brooks-Grodon - 2002 - Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  27. Impressionism a Feminist Reading : The Gendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century.Norma Broude - 1997
  28. Manhood and Politics.Wendy Brown - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  29. Emigration for Women.E. L. Browne - 1883
  30. I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala.Elisabeth Burgos-Debray & Ann Wright - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (2):225-229.
  31. Hegel's Concept of Mutual Recognition: The Limits of Self-Determination.Victoria I. Burke - 2005 - Philosophical Forum 36 (2):213-220.
    For Hegel, the ideal relation that two self-conscious beings might have to each other is one of reciprocal mutual recognition. According to Hegel, “a self-consciousness exists for [another] consciousness.” That is, self-consciousness is defined by its being recognized as self-conscious by another self-consciousness. In one formulation, Robert Pippin says that this means that “being a free agent consists in being recognized as one.” However, at the same time, Hegel values self-determination, which suggests a fundamental independence from others. The formative activity (...)
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  32. The Political Structure of Emotion: From Dismissal to Dialogue.Sylvia Burrow - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):27-43.
    How much power does emotional dismissal have over the oppressed's ability to trust outlaw emotions, or to stand for such emotions before others? I discuss Sue Campbell's view of the interpretation of emotion in light of the political significance of emotional dismissal. In response, I suggest that feminist conventions of interpretation developed within dialogical communities are best suited to providing resources for expressing, interpreting, defining, and reflecting on our emotions.
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  33. Resistance to Prevention: Reconsidering Feminist Antiviolence Rhetoric.Nadya Burton - 1998 - In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press. pp. 182--200.
  34. Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification.Ann J. Cahill - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's equality (...)
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  35. Making Feminist History the Literary Scholarship of Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar.William E. Cain - 1994
  36. Editors' Introduction To.Joan C. Callahan, Bonnie Mann & Sara Ruddick - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1).
  37. Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage.V. J. Callan - 1986 - Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  38. Women, “False” Memory, and Personal Identity.Sue Campbell - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):51-82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  39. Ladelle McWhorter, Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America. [REVIEW]Anna Carastathis - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (1):250-256.
  40. The Atrocity Paradigm Revisited.Claudia Card - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):212 - 222.
    This essay reflects on issues raised by commentators regarding my book, The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil (Oxford 2002). They are (1) Robin Schott's observation of the tension between my discussion of forgiveness and of castration fantasies; (2) Bat-Ami Bar On's questions regarding whether evil is ethical, political, or both; (3) Adam Morton's queries regarding the relative seriousness of evils and injustices; and (4) María Pía Lara's concerns regarding what is valuable in Kant's ethics.
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  41. On Feminist Ethics & Politics.Claudia Card - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (4):233-235.
  42. Oppression and Resistance: Frye's Politics of Reality.Claudia Card - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):149-166.
  43. Feminist Ethics and Politics.Claudia F. Card (ed.) - 1999 - University Press of Kansas.
  44. Marx, Rawls, Cohen, and Feminism.Paula Casal - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (4):811-828.
    Although G. A. Cohen's work on Marx was flawed by a lack of gender-awareness, his work on Rawls owes much of its success to feminist inspiration. Cohen appeals effectively to feminism to rebut the basic structure objection to his egalitarian ethos, and could now appeal to feminism in response to Andrew Williams's publicity objection to this ethos. The article argues that Williams's objection is insufficient to rebut Cohen's ethos, inapplicable to variants of this ethos, and in conflict with plausible gender-egalitarian (...)
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  45. Feminist Politics and Fetal Surgery: Adventures of a Research Cowgirl on the Reproductive Frontier.Monica J. Casper - 1997 - Feminist Studies 23 (2).
  46. Sexuality Situated: Beauvoir on "Frigidity".Sue L. Cataldi - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):70-82.
    This essay relates scenes from Beauvoir's novels to her views of female eroticism and frigidity in The Second Sex. Expressions of frigidity signal unjust power relations in Beauvoir's literature. She constructs frigidity as a symbolic means of rejecting dominance in heterosexual relations. Thus frigidity need not be interpreted, as it sometimes is, as a form of bad faith. The essay concludes with some thoughts on the relevance of Beauvoir's view of frigidity to contemporary feminism.
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  47. Working with Men Feminism and Social Work.Kate Cavanagh & Viviene E. Cree - 1996
  48. Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect.Caze Marguerite la - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  49. From Girlhood to Womanhood.G. M. Chambers - 1914 - The Eugenics Review 6 (2):171.
  50. Judith Butler and Political Theory: Troubling Politics.Samuel Allen Chambers - 2008 - Routledge.
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