This category has changed name
This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

76 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 76
  1. Against "Post-Ethnic" Futures.Linda Alcoff - 2004 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (2):99-117.
  2. Latinos and the Categories of Race.Linda Martin Alcoff - manuscript
    Apparently, Latinos are “taking over.” 1 With news that Latinos have become the largest minority group in the United States, the public airwaves are filled with concerned voices about the impact that a non-English dominant, Catholic, non-white, largely poor population will have on “American” identity. Aside from the hysteria, Latino identity poses some authentically new questions for the standard way in which minority identities are conceptualized. Are Latinos a race, an ethnicity, or some combination? What does it mean to have (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. The Problem of Speaking for Others.Linda Martin Alcoff - manuscript
    This was published in Cultural Critique (Winter 1991-92), pp. 5-32; revised and reprinted in Who Can Speak? Authority and Critical Identity edited by Judith Roof and Robyn Wiegman, University of Illinois Press, 1996; and in Feminist Nightmares: Women at Odds edited by Susan Weisser and Jennifer Fleischner, (New York: New York University Press, 1994); and also in Racism and Sexism: Differences and Connections eds. David Blumenfeld and Linda Bell, Rowman and Littlefield, 1995.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  4. Latino/as, Asian Americans, and the Black–White Binary.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2003 - Journal of Ethics 7 (1):5-27.
    This paper aims to contribute toward coalitionbuilding by showing that, even if we try tobuild coalition around what might look like ourmost obvious common concern – reducing racism –the dominant discourse of racial politics inthe United States inhibits an understanding ofhow racism operates vis-à-vis Latino/as andAsian Americans, and thus proves more of anobstacle to coalition building than an aid. Theblack/white paradigm, which operates to governracial classifications and racial politics inthe U.S., takes race in the U.S. to consist ofonly two racial (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. What Should White People Do?Linda Martín Alcoff - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):6 - 26.
    In this paper I explore white attempts to move toward a proactive position against racism that will amount to more than self-criticism in the following three ways: by assessing the debate within feminism over white women's relation to whiteness; by exploring "white awareness training" methods developed by Judith Katz and the "race traitor" politics developed by Ignatiev and Garvey, and; a case study of white revisionism being currently attempted at the University of Mississippi.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  6. Identity, Knowledge, and Toni Morrison's "Beloved": Questions About Understanding Racism.E. Babbitt Susan - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):1 - 18.
    In discussing Drucilla Cornell's remarks about Toni Morrison's Beloved, I consider epistemological questions raised by the acquiring of understanding of racism, particularly the deep-rooted racism embodied in social norms and values. I suggest that questions about understanding racism are, in part, questions about personal and political identities and that questions about personal and political identities are often, importantly, epistemological questions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7. Identity, Knowledge, and Toni Morrison's Beloved: Questions About Understanding Racism.E. Babbitt Susan - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (3):1-18.
    In discussing Drucilla Cornell's remarks about Toni Morrison's Beloved, I consider epistemological questions raised by the acquiring of understanding of racism, particularly the deep-rooted racism embodied in social norms and values. I suggest that questions about understanding racism are, in part, questions about personal and political identities and that questions about personal and political identities are often, importantly, epistemological questions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Libertarianism, Feminism, and Nonviolent Action: A Synthesis.Grant Babcock - 2012 - Libertarian Papers 4.
    There is a need to develop libertarian responses to writings on race, gender, and sexual orientation. Offering such responses not only demonstrates to potential opponents of libertarian reform that libertarianism can seriously address these issues: libertarian responses can also help us confront forms of “private” oppression that are not per se un-libertarian, but which support state oppression. Drawing on thinkers such as Murray Rothbard, Roderick Long, Charles Johnson, Gene Sharp, Wendy McElroy, and bell hooks, this paper establishes historical links between (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. 'White Talk' as a Barrier to Understanding Whiteness.Alison Bailey - 2014 - In George Yancy (ed.), White Self-Criticality beyond Anti-racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem? Lexington Books. pp. 37-57.
    My project is to explain why the question ‘How does it feel to be a white problem?’ cannot be answered in the fluttering grammar of white talk. The whiteness of white talk lies not only in its having emerged from white mouths, but also in its evasiveness—in its attempt to suppress fear and anxiety, and its consequential [if unintended] reinscription and legitimation of racist oppression. I White talk is designed, indeed scripted, for the purposes of evading, rejecting, and remaining ignorant (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a Theory of White Character Formation.Alison Bailey - 2000 - In Sandra Harding & Uma Narayan (eds.), Hypatia. University of Indiana Press.
    This essay explores how the social location of white traitorous identities might be understood. I begin by examining some of the problematic implications of Sandra Harding's standpoint framework description of race traitors as 'becoming marginal.' I argue that the location of white traitors might be better understood in terms of their 'decentering the center.' I distinguish between 'privilege-cognizant' and 'privilege-evasive' white scripts. Drawing on the work of Marilyn Frye and Anne Braden, I offer an account of the contrasting perceptions and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. Despising an Identity They Taught Me to Claim.Alison Bailey - 1999 - In Chris J. Cuomo & Kim Q. Hall (eds.), WHITENESS: FEMINIST PHILOSOPHICAL NARRATIVES.
    This essay is a personal philosophical reflection on particular dilemma privilege-cognizant white feminists face in thinking through how to use privilege in liberatory ways. Privilege takes on a new dimension for whites who resist common defensive or guilt-ridden responses to privilege and struggle to understand the connections between ill-gotten advantages and the genuine injustices that deny humanity to peoples of color. The temptation to despise whiteness and its accompanying privilege is a common response to white privilege awareness and it is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Locating Traitorous Identities: Toward a View of Privilege-Cognizant White Character.Alison Bailey - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):27 - 42.
    I address the problem of how to locate "traitorous" subjects, or those who belong to dominant groups yet resist the usual assumptions and practices of those groups. I argue that Sandra Harding's description of traitors as insiders, who "become marginal" is misleading. Crafting a distinction between "privilege-cognizant" and "privilege-evasive" white scripts, I offer an alternative account of race traitors as privilege-cognizant whites who refuse to animate expected whitely scripts, and who are unfaithful to worldviews whites are expected to hold.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  13. The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body.Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn Zita - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on “whiteness” in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Anna Julia Cooper: "Dedicated in the Name of My Slave Mother to the Education of Colored Working People".Cathryn Bailey - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):56-73.
    The achievements of Anna Julia Cooper are extraordinary given her life circumstances. Driven by a desire Cooper called "a thumping within," she became a prominent educator, earned her Ph.D., and influenced the thought of W.E.B. DuBois and others. Cooper fought for her educational philosophy, but despite her contributions, her apparent elitism has shaped contemporary assessments of her work. I argue that her views must be considered in social and historical context.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Wright-Ing White: The Construction of Race in Women's 19th Century Didactic Texts.Lucy E. Bailey - 2006 - Journal of Thought 41 (4):65.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. Aisha Khan. Callaloo Nation: Metaphors of Race and Religious Identity Among South Asians in Trinidad and Viranjini Munasinghe. Callaloo or Tossed Salad?: East Indians and the Cultural Politics of Identity in Trinidad.Sonia Balaram - 2011 - Clr James Journal 17 (1):184-191.
  17. Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's "Damnation of Women".Katharine Lawrence Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  18. Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays.Elizabeth Ann Bartlett - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  20. The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader. Edited by Analouise Keating. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2009; and Bridging: How Gloria Anzaldúa's Life and Work Transformed Our Own. Edited by Analouise Keating and Gloria González‐López. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2011. [REVIEW]Edwina Barvosa - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (2):377-382.
  21. Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self (Review).Linda A. Bell - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):196-200.
  22. Freedom as Going Off Script.Jennifer Benson - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (2):355-370.
    In this manuscript I explore an example of an over-privileged white woman who encounters two young Black men in a parking garage stairwell. Two related axioms are central to the oppressive script that lies before these subjects: the hetero-patriarchal axiom that women are not safe alone at night and the racist axiom that Black men, especially young ones, are dangerous. These axioms are intended to ensure a practical conclusion—white women and Black men are supposed to avoid each other—thereby conferring legitimacy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Symposia on Gender, Race and Philosophy.Paul Benson - 2011 - Hypatia 24 (4):26-49.
  24. I, Rigoberta Menchú: An Indian Woman in Guatemala.Elisabeth Burgos-Debray & Ann Wright - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (2):225-229.
  25. Essence Today: Hegel and the Economics of Identity Politics.Victoria I. Burke - 2007 - Philosophy Today 51 (1):79-90.
    The concept of essence is thought by many political theorists to be a residue of the patriarchal onto-theological tradition of metaphysics that needs to be (or has been) overcome by more progressive aims. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of essentialism in light of the treatment of the concept of essence in Hegel’s Science of Logic, and within the context of recent issues in critical race theory and feminism. I will argue that the role of an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Reply to Robert Gooding-Williams.Judith Butler - 1998 - Constellations 5 (1):42-47.
  27. The Foundations of the Politics of Difference.Peter Nathaniel Bwanali - 2004 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    This dissertation approaches Iris Marion Young's politics of difference as an essential condition for deliberative democracy. It identifies and examines Young's arguments in four areas foundational to the politics of difference namely, inclusion, political equality, reasonableness and publicity. It contends that some of the arguments sustaining these foundations are shaky. Therefore, the dissertation attempts to improve the weak aspects of Young's arguments in order to solidify the basis for the politics of difference and, in so doing, facilitate the development of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Mujeres Latinoamericanas Del Siglo Xx Historia y Cultura.Luisa Campuzano, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana & Casa de la Américas - 1998
  29. Reinvigorating Intersectionality as a Provisional Concept.Anna Carastathis - 2014 - In Namita Goswami, Maeve O'Donovan & Lisa Yount (eds.), Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach. Pickering & Chatto. pp. 59-70.
    Challenging the triumphal narrative of ‘political completion’ that surrounds intersectionality--as ‘the’ way to theorize the relationship among systems of oppression--and which helps to cement the impression of mainstream feminism’s arrival at a postracial moment, I argue we should instead approach intersectionality as a ‘provisional concept’ which disorients entrenched essentialist cognitive habits. Rather than assume that ‘intersectionality’ has a stable, positive definition, I suggest intersectionality anticipates rather than delivers the normative or theoretical goals often imputed to it.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. Ladelle McWhorter, Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America. [REVIEW]Anna Carastathis - 2012 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 16 (1):250-256.
  31. Whiteness and Feminism: Déjà Vu Discourses, What's Next?Blanche Radford Curry - 2004 - In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
  32. Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy.Maria del Guadalupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines & Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds.) - 2010 - SUNY Press.
    A range of themes—race and gender, sexuality, otherness, sisterhood, and agency—run throughout this collection, and the chapters constitute a collective discourse at the intersection of Black feminist thought and continental philosophy, converging on a similar set of questions and concerns. These convergences are not random or forced, but are in many ways natural and necessary: the same issues of agency, identity, alienation, and power inevitably are addressed by both camps. Never before has a group of scholars worked together to examine (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Ethnic, Immigrant, and Racialized Women in Canada: A Historiography.Julie Dinh - 2012 - Constellations (University of Alberta Student Journal) 3 (2).
    Since the emergence of ̳new left‘, bottom up approach to history in the 1960s and 1970s, women‘s and gender history has become a rich field for historians. Ethnic and immigrant women‘s history, as part of this larger movement, has seen its own fair share of growth. This paper examines the emergence of racialized women‘s history in Canada and analyzes the increasingly inclusive and complex integration of this field through the works of notable authors in recent decades.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Concrete Flowers: Contemplating the Profession of Philosophy.Kristie Dotson - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):403-409.
  35. Who Counts as a Muslim? Identity, Multiplicity and Politics.Saba Fatima - 2011 - Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 31 (3):339-353.
    My aim in this paper is to carve out a political understanding of the Muslim identity. The Muslim identity is shaped within a religious mold. Inseparable from this religious understanding is a political one that is valuable in its own right in order to secure any sustainable possibility of participating politically as Muslims within a democratic liberal democracy, such as the United States. Here I explore not the historical or theological formation of the Muslim identity, rather a metaphysical understanding of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36. Family Bonds: Genealogies of Race and Gender.Ellen K. Feder - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Ellen Feder's monograph is an attempt to think about the categories of race and gender together. She explains and then employs some critical tools derived from Foucault , in order to advance her main argument: that the institution of the family is the locus of the production of gender and race, and that gender is best understood as a function of a "disciplinary" power that operates within the family, while race is the function of a "regulatory" power acting upon the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37. The Dangerous Individual('s) Mother: Biopower, Family, and the Production of Race.Ellen K. Feder - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):60-78.
    : Even as feminist analyses have contributed in important ways to discussions of how gender is raced and race is gendered, there has been little in the way of comparative analysis of the specific mechanisms that are at work in the production of each. Feder argues that in Michel Foucault's analytics of power we find tools to understand the reproduction of whiteness as a complex interaction of distinctive expressions of power associated with these categories of difference.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  38. The Machinery of Whiteness: Studies in the Structure of Racialization. By Steve Martinot. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2010. [REVIEW]Ann Ferguson - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (3):943-945.
  39. Being a Black Woman Philosopher: Reflections on Founding the Collegium of Black Women Philosophers.Kathryn T. Gines - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (2):429-437.
    Although the American Philosophical Association has more than 11,000 members, there are still fewer than 125 Black philosophers in the United States, including fewer than thirty Black women holding a PhD in philosophy and working in a philosophy department in the academy.1The following is a “musing” about how I became one of them and how I have sought to create a positive philosophical space for all of us.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  40. Falguni A. Sheth: Toward a Political Philosophy of Race. [REVIEW]Lewis Gordon - 2011 - Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):119-130.
  41. Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism (Review).Emily Grosholz - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (4):209-212.
  42. The Ethics and Politics of Otherness: Negotiating Alterity and Racial Difference.Lisa Guenther - 2011 - Philosophia: A Journal of Feminist Continental Philosophy 1 (2):195-214.
    "In her essay "Choosing the Margin," bell hooks draws attention to the way uncritical celebrations of difference and otherness often act as an alibi for progressive politics. The recent proliferation of discourses on alterity, particularly with the growth of Levinas studies, makes hooks's critique all the more relevant for ethical and political theory today. To what extent has this emphasis on alterity affected the dynamics of philosophical and political life? Does it fall into the trap that hooks identifies here as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Border Crossings: Multicultural and Postcolonial Feminist Challenges to Philosophy (Part II).Sandra Harding & Uma Narayan - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (3):1-5.
  44. Gender and Race: (What) Are They? (What) Do We Want Them to Be?Sally Haslanger - 2000 - Noûs 34 (1):31–55.
    It is always awkward when someone asks me informally what I’m working on and I answer that I’m trying to figure out what gender is. For outside a rather narrow segment of the academic world, the term ‘gender’ has come to function as the polite way to talk about the sexes. And one thing people feel pretty confident about is their knowledge of the difference between males and females. Males are those human beings with a range of familiar primary and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   51 citations  
  45. Healing Identities: Black Feminist Thought and the Politics of Groups (Review).Hill Collins Patricia - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):227-230.
  46. Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice, And: Policing the National Body: Race, Gender, and Criminalization, And: Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide (Review).Sarah Lucia Hoagland - forthcoming - Hypatia 22 (2):182-188.
  47. Between Races and Generations: Materializing Race and Kinship in Moraga and Irigaray.Sabrina L. Hom - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (3):419-435.
    Juxtaposing Cherríe Moraga's Loving in the War Years and Luce Irigaray's Speculum of the Other Woman, I explore the ways that sex and race intersect to complicate an Irigarayan account of the relations between mother and daughter. Irigaray's work is an effective tool for understanding the disruptive and potentially healing desire between mothers and daughters, but her insistence on sex as primary difference must be challenged in order to acknowledge the intersectionality of sex and race. Working from recent work on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self by Linda Alcoff.David Ingram - 2011 - Constellations 18 (1):106-109.
  49. What Lies Ahead: Envisioning New Futures for Feminist Philosophy.Kristen Intemann, Emily S. Lee, Kristin Mccartney, Shireen Roshanravan & Alexa Schriempf - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):927 - 934.
    Thanks in large, part to the record of schohrship fostered by Hypatia, feminist philosophers are now positioned not just as critics of the canon, but as innovators advancing uniquely feminist perspectives for theorizing about the world. As relatively junior feminist scholars, the five of us were called upon to provide some reflections on emerging trends in feminist philosophy and to comment on its future. Despite the fact that we come from diverse subfields and philosophical traditions, four common aims emerged in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Gender, Race, and Difference.Alison M. Jaggar - 1996 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 35 (Supplement):21-51.
1 — 50 / 76