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Summary Feminist approaches to pornography are diverse, complex and contested, crossing disciplines from cultural studies to law; women's studies to applied social science. This range continues within feminist philosophical perspectives, where pornography is examined as practice, speech and product across phenomenology, ethics, aesthetics, moral and political philosophy.
Key works Langton 2009 Mason-Grant 2004
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158 found
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1 — 50 / 158
  1. added 2020-05-01
    How Not To Watch Feminist Pornography.Richard Kimberly Heck - manuscript
    This paper has three goals. The first is to defend Tristan Taromino and Erika Lust (or some of their films) from criticisms that Rebecca Whisnant and Hans Maes make of them. Toward that end, I will be arguing against the narrow conceptions that Whisnant and Maes have of what `feminist' pornography must be like. More generally, I hope to show by example why it is important to take pornographic films seriously as films if we're to understand their potential to shape, (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-01
    Does Pornography Presuppose Rape Myths?Richard Kimberly Heck - manuscript
    Rae Langton and Caroline West have argued that pornography silences women by presupposing misogynistic attitudes, such as that women enjoy being raped. More precisely, they claim that a somewhat infamous pictorial, “Dirty Pool”, makes such presuppositions. I argue for four claims. (i) Langton and West's account of how pornography silences women is empirically dubious. (ii) There is no evidence that very much pornography makes the sorts of presuppositions they require. (iii) Even "Dirty Pool", for all its other problems, does not (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-01
    Pornography and Accommodation.Richard Kimberly Heck - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    In 'Scorekeeping in a Pornographic Language Game', Rae Langton and Caroline West borrow ideas from David Lewis to attempt to explain how pornography might subordinate and silence women. Pornography is supposed to express certain misogynistic claims implicitly, through presupposition, and to convey them indirectly, through accommodation. I argue that the appeal to accommodation cannot do the sort of work Langton and West want it to do: Their case rests upon an overly simpified model of that phenomenon. I argue further that, (...)
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  4. added 2020-04-23
    Effects of Porn: A Critical Analysis.Rory Collins - forthcoming - 1890: A Journal of Undergraduate Research.
    The impacts of pornography are varied and complex. Performers are often thought to be victims of abuse and exploitation, while viewers are regularly accused of becoming desensitised to sexual violence. Further, porn is held by some to perpetuate damaging racial and gender stereotypes. I contend that these accusations, though not entirely baseless, are undermined for two reasons: they rest on questionable empirical evidence and ignore many of the positive consequences porn may have. In this article, I organise my analysis from (...)
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  5. added 2020-03-11
    Fixing Pornography’s Illocutionary Force: Which Context Matters?Mari Mikkola - 2019 - Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    Rae Langton famously argues that pornographic speech illocutionarily subordinates and silences women. Making good this view hinges on identifying the context relevant for fixing such force. To do so, a parallel is typically drawn between pornographic recordings and multipurpose signs involved in delayed communication, but the parallel generates a dispute about the right illocutionary force-fixing context. Jennifer Saul and myself argue that if pornographic speech is akin to multipurpose signs, its illocutionary force is fixed by the actual decoding context: of (...)
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  6. added 2019-11-11
    Pornography and Dehumanization: The Essentialist Dimension.Eleonore Neufeld - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-15.
    The objective of this paper is to show that pornography dehumanizes women through essentialization. First, I argue that certain acts of subject-essentialization are acts of subject-dehumanization. Second, I demonstrate, by reviewing evidence about the linguistic material we find in and around pornography, that pornography systematically deploys content that essentializes women in the ways identified as problematic. It follows that pornography dehumanizes women.
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  7. added 2019-06-18
    Andrea Dworkin's Knowledge Strategies.Marilyn Frye - manuscript
    "Andrea Dworkin's Knowledge Strategies," a talk given at a symposium in memory of Andrea Dworkin, at Michigan State University, February 2006.
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  8. added 2019-06-16
    Provocative Positions: Review of Magic Mommas, Trembling Sisters, Puritans and Perverts: Feminist Essays by Joanna Russ. [REVIEW]Marilyn Frye - 1985 - The Women's Review of Books 2 (11):5-6.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Propaganda and the Authority of Pornography.Aidan McGlynn - 2016 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 31 (3):329-343.
    Jason Stanley’s How Propaganda Works characterises and explores one democratically problematic kind of propaganda, ‘undermining propaganda’, which involves ‘[a] contribution to public discourse that is presented as an embodiment of certain ideals, yet is of a kind that tends to erode those very ideals’. Stanley’s model for how undermining propaganda functions is Rae Langton and Caroline West’s treatment of moves in pornographic language games. However, Stanley doesn’t consider whether his theory of propaganda might in turn illuminate the harmful nature of (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Pornography as Symptom: Refocusing the Anti-Pornography Debate on Pornification and Sexualization.Jacob M. Held - 2013 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 20 (1):15-27.
    Anti-Porn activists have argued for decades that pom is discrimination, it hamis women as a class. The Pro-porn response has been to dismiss these concems, laud the First Amendment, or argue that pornography is a valuable contribution to society. The debate has progressed little beyond this stage. In this article, I argue that it is time to frame the pomography debate as a discussion on sexualized media in general. Recent research indicates that the negative results often attributed to hard-core pornography, (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    "Overcoming Objectification: A Carnal Ethics," by Ann J. Cahill. [REVIEW]Shoshana Brassfield - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (2):217-221.
    The central argument of Ann Cahill’s Overcoming Objectification is that the concept of sexual objectification should be replaced by Cahill’s concept of derivatization in order to better capture the wrongness of degrading images and practices without depending on an objectionably narrow and disembodied conception of self. To derivatize someone is not to treat her as a non-person, but rather to treat her as a derivative person, reducing her to an aspect of another’s being. Although not perfect, Cahill’s approach advances the (...)
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  12. added 2019-06-06
    A First Look at the Pornography/Civil Rights Ordinance: Could Pornography Be the Subordination of Women?Melinda Vadas - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (9):487-511.
  13. added 2019-04-05
    Commentary on A.W. Eaton's "A Sensible Antiporn Feminism".Ishani Maitra - 2008 - Symposia on Gender, Race, and Philosophy 4 (2).
  14. added 2019-04-01
    Pornography, Verbal Acts, and Viewpoint Discrimination.Cynthia A. Stark - 1998 - Public Affairs Quarterly 12 (4):429-445.
    Catharine MacKinnon argues that pornography is action, rather than speech. She argues further that the speech/action distinction is what delineates the scope of the First Amendment. It follows, she thinks, that pornography does not fall within the scope of the First Amendment. I argue that the legal distinction between speech and action on which MacKinnon relies is unstable and therefore cannot determine which utterances fall within the scope of the First Amendment. Indeed, attempting to sort utterances by means of the (...)
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  15. added 2019-03-31
    Subordinating Speech.Ishani Maitra - 2012 - In Mary Kate McGowan Ishani Maitra (ed.), Speech and Harm: Controversies Over Free Speech. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 94-120.
    This chapter considers whether ordinary instances of racist hate speech can be authoritative, thereby constituting the subordination of people of color. It is often said that ordinary speakers cannot subordinate because they lack authority. Here it is argued that there are more ways in which speakers can come to have authority than have been generally recognized. In part, this is because authority has been taken to be too closely tied to social position. This chapter presents a series of examples which (...)
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  16. added 2019-03-25
    Testimonial Injustice, Pornography, and Silencing.Aidan McGlynn - 2019 - Analytic Philosophy 60 (4):405-417.
    In this paper, I develop two criticisms of Miranda Fricker’s attempt to offer an interpretation of MacKinnon’s claim that pornography silences women that conceives of the silencing in question as an extreme form of testimonial injustice. The intended contrast is with the speech act theoretical model of silencing familiar from Rae Langton and Jennifer Hornsby, who appeal to MacKinnon’s claim to argue against the standard liberal line on pornography, which takes a permissive stance to be demanded by a right to (...)
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  17. added 2019-02-05
    ‘It’s Just a Story’: Pornography, Desire, and the Ethics of Fictive Imagining.Christopher Bartel & Anna Cremaldi - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):37-50.
    Is it ever morally wrong for a consumer to imagine something immoral in a work of fiction, or for an author to prompt such imagining? Brandon Cooke has recently argued that it cannot be. On Cooke’s account, fictive imagining is immune to moral criticism because such cases of imagining do not amount to the endorsement of the immoral content, nor do they imply that the authors of such fictions necessarily endorse their contents. We argue against Cooke that in fact fictively (...)
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  18. added 2018-02-17
    Indexicals, Speech Acts and Pornography.Claudia Bianchi - 2008 - Analysis 68 (4):310-316.
    In the last twenty years, recorded messages and written notes have become a significant test and an intriguing puzzle for the semantics of indexical expressions (see Smith 1989, Predelli 1996, 1998a,1998b, 2002, Corazza et al. 2002, Romdenh-Romluc 2002). In particular, the intention-based approach proposed by Stefano Predelli has proven to bear interesting relations to several major questions in philosophy of language. In a recent paper (Saul 2006), Jennifer Saul draws on the literature on indexicals and recorded messages in order to (...)
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  19. added 2018-02-16
    Art and Pornography: Philosophical Essays.Hans Maes & Jerrold Levinson (eds.) - 2012 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Art and Pornography presents a series of essays which investigate the artistic status and aesthetic dimension of pornographic pictures, films, and literature, and explores the distinction, if there is any, between pornography and erotic art. Is there any overlap between art and pornography, or are the two mutually exclusive? If they are, why is that? If they are not, how might we characterize pornographic art or artistic pornography, and how might pornographic art be distinguished, if at all, from erotic art? (...)
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  20. added 2017-10-25
    Whose Right? Ronald Dworkin, Women, and Pornographers.Rae Langton - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (4):311-359.
  21. added 2017-10-24
    Is Pornography Like the Law?Rae Langton - 2017 - In Mari Mikkola (ed.), Beyond Speech: Pornography and Analytic Feminist Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 23-38.
  22. added 2017-02-09
    Porn: Philosophy for Everyone.Dave Monroe (ed.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
  23. added 2017-01-29
    Alan Soble, Pornography: Marxism, Feminism, and the Future of Sexuality. [REVIEW]Richard Mohr - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8:114-116.
  24. added 2017-01-28
    Review of Sexual Solipsism: Philosophical Essays on Pornography and Objectification. [REVIEW]Cristina Roadevin - 2010 - Disputatio 4 (29):75-82.
  25. added 2017-01-27
    Is Pornography an Action?: The Causal Vs. The Conceptual View of Pornography's Harm.Cynthia A. Stark - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (2):277-306.
    According to Catharine MacKinnon, pornography itself subordinates women by ranking women as inferior to men and legitimating acts of violence and discrimination against us. As such, pornography is directly implicated in women's diminished moral and civil status. It follows that pornography is not a form of speech, but rather an action, and so does not deserve first amendment protection. I argue that MacKinnon does not adequately support her claim that pornography is an action but instead shows that it is harmful (...)
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  26. added 2017-01-27
    Susan M. Easton. The Problem of Pornography: Regulation and the Right to Free Speech.G. Graham - 1995 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 12 (3):297-297.
  27. added 2017-01-27
    Pornography: Marxism, Feminism, and the Future of Sexuality. [REVIEW]Ellen Pederson - 1988 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 9 (2).
  28. added 2017-01-26
    Alan Soble, Pornography: Marxism, Feminism, and the Future of Sexuality Reviewed By.Richard D. Mohr - 1988 - Philosophy in Review 8 (3):114-116.
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  29. added 2017-01-15
    On Pornography: MacKinnon, Speech Acts, and “False” Construction.Mary Kate Mcgowan - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):22-49.
    Although others have focused on Catharine MacKinnon's claim that pornography subordinates and silences women, I here focus on her claim that pornography constructs women's nature and that this construction is, in some sense, false. Since it is unclear how pornography, as speech, can construct facts and how constructed facts can nevertheless be false, MacKinnon's claim requires elucidation. Appealing to speech act theory, I introduce an analysis of the erroneous verdictive and use it to make sense of MacKinnon's constructionist claims. I (...)
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  30. added 2017-01-15
    On Pornography: MacKinnon, Speech Acts, and "False" Construction.Mary Kathryn McGowan - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):23-49.
  31. added 2017-01-15
    On Pornography, Representation and Sexual Agency.Consuelo M. Concepcion - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):97-100.
    I argue that Alisa Carse's call for antipornography legislation sets a potentially dangerous legal move that could threaten to shut off the dialogue women need to redefine the meanings and terms of our sexualities. I also argue that the terms of legitimacy need to be re-examined outside a legal system that systematically fails to protect the rights of sexual minorities.
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  32. added 2017-01-15
    Rethinking the Pornography Debate: Some Ontological Considerations.Constance Mui - 1998 - Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 10 (2):118-127.
  33. added 2017-01-14
    Porn.Com: Making Sense of Online Pornography.Feona Attwood (ed.) - 2010 - Peter Lang.
  34. added 2016-12-30
    Concepts of Pornography: Aesthetics, Feminism, and Methodology.Kania Andrew - 2012 - In Jerrold Levinson & Hans Maes (eds.), Art and pornography: Philosophical essays. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 254-276.
    I discuss a recent notable attempt to sharply distinguish pornography from erotic art, and argue that the attempt fails. I then turn to methodological questions about how we ought to go about defining ‘pornography’, questions which lead quickly to others about why we want such a definition. I believe that philosophers of art can make important contributions to this definitional project, but only if their contributions are informed by recent work in feminism, philosophical analysis, and art history.
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  35. added 2016-08-08
    Pornographic Subordination, Power, and Feminist Alternatives.Matt L. Drabek - 2016 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):1-19.
    How does pornography subordinate on the basis of gender? I provide part of an answer in this paper by framing subordination as something that works through everyday classification. Under certain material and social conditions, pornography classifies people through labeling them in ways that connect to structures of oppression. I hope to show two things. First, pornographic content is not the major driving force behind pornography’s subordination of women. Second, pornography, when repurposed in new ways, carries the potential to counter the (...)
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  36. added 2016-08-08
    Why Internet Porn Matters.Margret Grebowicz - 2013 - Stanford University Press.
    Now that pornography is on the Internet, its political and social functions have changed. So contends Margret Grebowicz in this imperative philosophical analysis of Internet porn. The production and consumption of Internet porn, in her account, are a symptom of the obsession with self-exposure in today's social networking media, which is, in turn, a symptom of the modern democratic construction of the governable subject as both transparent and communicative. In this first feminist critique to privilege the effects of pornography's Internet (...)
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  37. added 2016-08-08
    The Obscenity of Internet Pornography: A Philosophical Analysis of the Regulation of Sexually Explicit Internet Content.Amy E. White - 2004 - Dissertation, Bowling Green State University
    This dissertation has two principle aims: To show that current arguments from proponents and opponents of the regulation of sexually explicit Internet content are unsound and to construct an argument against content regulation that avoids the failures of current arguments. ;The dissertation is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter One I provide background information on attempts to regulate sexually explicit materials and briefly outline the development of the Internet. Chapter Two examines the current regulation of obscenity on the Internet. Chapter (...)
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  38. added 2016-08-08
    Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    : In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but it (...)
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  39. added 2016-06-20
    Pornography's Many Meanings: A Reply to C. M. Concepcion.Alisa L. Carse - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):101-111.
    C.M. Concepcion's review of "Pornography: An Uncivil Liberty?" fundamentally misconstrues the position defended in that article. This paper examines possible sources of this misconstrual, focusing critical attention on the narrowly crafted, morally loaded notion of "pornography" that figures centrally in the original argument under review. Pornography is not a category of speech that can be characterized as having one crucial meaning or message, nor is the message of pornography easily identifiable in instances of pornographic speech. This raises the problem of (...)
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  40. added 2016-06-20
    Cultural and Ideological Bias in Pornography Research.Ferrel M. Christensen - 1990 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 20 (3):351-375.
  41. added 2016-06-20
    Pornography and the Alienation of Male Sexuality.Harry Brod - 1988 - Social Theory and Practice 14 (3):265-284.
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  42. added 2016-03-14
    Pornography's Many Meanings: A Reply to C. M. Concepcion.Alisa L. Carse - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):101-111.
    C.M. Concepcion's review of “Pornography: An Uncivil Liberty?” fundamentally misconstrues the position defended in that article. This paper examines possible sources of this misconstrual, focusing critical attention on the narrowly crafted, morally loaded notion of “pornography” that figures centrally in the original argument under review. Pornography is not a category of speech that can be characterized as having one crucial meaning or message, nor is the message of pornography easily identifiable in instances of pornographic speech. This raises the problem of (...)
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  43. added 2016-03-04
    Contexts and Pornography.Mari Mikkola - 2008 - Analysis 68 (4):316-320.
    Jennifer Saul has argued that the speech acts approach to pornography, where pornography has the illocutionary force of subordinating women, is undermined by that very approach: if pornographic works are speech acts, they must be utterances in contexts; and if we take contexts seriously, it follows that only some pornographic viewings subordinate women. In an effort to defend the speech acts approach, Claudia Bianchi argues that Saul focuses on the wrong context to fix pornography’s illocutionary force. In response, I defend (...)
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  44. added 2016-02-29
    Pornography.Susan Dwyer - unknown
    Pornography has attracted a good deal of academic and political attention, primarily from feminists of various persuasions, moral philosophers, and legal scholars. Surprisingly less work has been forthcoming from film theorists, given how much pornography has been produced on video and DVD and is now available through live streaming video over the Internet. Indeed, it is not until 1989, with the publication of Linda Williams’ groundbreaking Hard Core, that pornography is distinguished, in terms of its content, intent, and governing conventions, (...)
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  45. added 2016-02-29
    The Limits of Free Speech: Pornography and the Question of Coverage.Ishani Maitra & Mary Kate McGowan - 2007 - Legal Theory 13 (1):41-68.
    Many liberal societies are deeply committed to freedom of speech. This commitment is so entrenched that when it seems to come into conflict with other commitments (e.g., gender equality), it is often argued that the commitment to speech must trump the other commitments. In this paper, we argue that a proper understanding of our commitment to free speech requires being clear about what should count as speech for these purposes. On the approach we defend, should get a special, technical sense, (...)
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  46. added 2016-02-29
    Prostitution and Pornography: Philosophical Debate About the Sex Industry.Jessica Spector (ed.) - 2006 - Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
    _Prostitution and Pornography_ examines debates about the sex industry and the adequacy of the liberal response to critiques of the sex industry. The anthology focuses particularly on the very different ways prostitution and pornography are treated. Unlike other books that deal with the sex industry, this volume brings together academics and industry veterans and survivors to discuss the ways prostitution, pornography, and other forms of commercial sex are treated, and to ask questions about the role that ideas about the self, (...)
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  47. added 2016-02-29
    John Stuart Mill and the Harm of Pornography.David Dyzenhaus - 1992 - Ethics 102 (3):534-551.
  48. added 2016-01-04
    Art and Pornography: Philosophical Essays, Edited by H. Maes and J. Levinson. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 344 Pp. ISBN 978‐0‐19‐960958‐1 Hb £35. [REVIEW]Mari Mikkola - 2014 - European Journal of Philosophy 22 (S2):e15-e21.
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  49. added 2016-01-04
    Art and Pornography. [REVIEW]Christopher Bartel - 2014 - British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (4):510-512.
  50. added 2016-01-04
    Pornography Addiction - a Supranormal Stimulus Considered in the Context of Neuroplasticity.Donald L. Hilton - 2013 - Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology 3.
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