About this topic
Summary Feminist theoretical works on rape and sexual violence focus on several key questions: 1) What defines rape and sexual violence? 2) What are the meanings of rape and sexual violence?  How are those meanings influenced by social, historical, and political contexts? 3) How do rape and sexual violence intersect with and perpetuate various systems of inequality, including those centered on race, gender, sexual orientation, ability, and others? 4) How do anti-rape efforts undermine, or, perhaps, perpetuate elements of a rape culture?
Key works Susan Brownmiller's Against Our Will (1975) offered an early version of the feminist argument that rape is primarily about power rather than sex.  Catharine MacKinnon countered this theory in her work Toward a Feminist Theory of State, where she argued that rape is the logical extension of a phallocentric, patriarchal system of sexual inequality.  Contemporary works include Susan Brison's Aftermath (the first feminist philosophical work that integrated first-person narrative of a sexual assault), Ann Cahill's Rethinking Rape (which argues against both Brownmiller's and MacKinnon's models), Louise du Toit's A Philosophical Investigation of Rape (which frames sexual violence as an assault on feminine subjectivity), and Debra Bergoffen's Contesting the Politics of Genocidal Rape (which analyzes decisions in international law that established rape as a violation of human dignity).  
Introductions See the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy's entry on "Feminist Perspectives on Rape" (http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/feminism-rape/) for an excellent introduction to the topic.
Related categories

424 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 424
  1. added 2018-12-18
    Rape and Resistance. [REVIEW]Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - 2018 - The Philosophers' Magazine 83:117-118.
  2. added 2018-01-16
    Reivew of The Technoscientific Witness of Rape by Andrea Quinlan. [REVIEW]Debra L. Jackson - 2017 - Somatechnics 7 (2):312-314.
  3. added 2017-11-07
    HUMAN TRAFFICKING: A THREAT TO STATE SECURITY AND HUMAN SECURITY.Duško Peulić - 2017 - Bezbjednost, Policija, Građani 13 (1):69-79.
    Abstract: The study observes the core of both trafficking in persons and security offering a preliminary understanding the interconnection between the two concepts which is indeed a precondition of the more thorough contemplation of this security problem. Noteworthy is also the further elaboration of the risk that link between violence and modern-day slavery represents having in mind society and the individual. This informal economy violates the principle of morality and is understood to be one of the most offensive crimes. Its (...)
  4. added 2017-11-07
    Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Man: Psychoanalysis and Masculinity.Donald Moss - 2012 - Routledge.
    Images and ideas associated with masculinity are forever in flux. In this book, Donald Moss addresses the never-ending effort of men—regardless of sexual orientation—to shape themselves in relation to the unstable notion of masculinity. Part 1 looks at the lifelong labor faced by boys and men of assessing themselves in relation to an always shifting, always receding, ideal of "masculinity." In Part 2, Moss considers a series of nested issues regarding homosexuality, homophobia and psychoanalysis. Part 3 focuses on the interface (...)
  5. added 2017-11-07
    Nostalgic Teleology: Schiller and the Three-Stage Schema of Humanism.Constantin Marius Behler - 1990 - Dissertation, Stanford University
    Friedrich Schiller's aesthetic and cultural theories represent the paradigmatic expression of a modern humanist discourse grounded in the three-stage schema of a lost and to-be-regained paradise of human identity and integrity. As such, Schiller's theoretical writings can be regarded as one of the founding documents and holy texts of the modern institutions of aesthetic education. Traditional readings have tended to follow Hegel's affirmative interpretation of Schiller's theoretical work as successfully breaking through the Kantian dualism of nature and freedom, thus stressing (...)
  6. added 2017-11-06
    Rape Culture and Epistemology.Bianca Crewe & Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa - manuscript
    This paper critiques a deferential attitude about the epistemology of sexual assault testimony. According to the deferential attitude, individuals and institutions should decline to act on allegations of sexual assault unless and until they are proven in a formal setting, i.e., a criminal court. We attack this deference from several angles, including the pervasiveness of rape culture in the criminal justice system, the epistemology of testimony and norms connecting knowledge and action, the harms of tacit idealizations away from important contextual (...)
  7. added 2017-11-06
    Processes of Criminalization in Domestic and International Law: Considering Sexual Violence.Michelle Madden Dempsey - 2018 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 12 (4):641-656.
    This article explores some conceptual issues regarding criminalization at the domestic and international levels. It attempts to explain what it means to say that a particular kind of conduct has been criminalized, and considers how the processes of criminalization differ in domestic and international law. In unpacking these issues, the article takes the examples of rape and sex trafficking in domestic and international legal systems, explores whether these offenses are criminalized more broadly in international criminal law as compared to domestic (...)
  8. added 2017-11-06
    Could There Ever Be an App for That? Consent Apps and the Problem of Sexual Assault.Danaher John - 2018 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 12 (1):143-165.
    Rape and sexual assault are major problems. In the majority of sexual assault cases consent is the central issue. Consent is, to borrow a phrase, the ‘moral magic’ that converts an impermissible act into a permissible one. In recent years, a handful of companies have tried to launch consent apps which aim to educate young people about the nature of sexual consent and allow them to record signals of consent for future verification. Although ostensibly aimed at addressing the problems of (...)
  9. added 2017-11-06
    Mens' Intrusion, Women's Embodiment: A Critical Analysis of Street Harassment.F. Vera-Gray - 2017 - Routledge.
    Research on violence against women tends to focus on topics such as sexual assault and intimate partner violence, arguably to the detriment of investigating men’s violence and intrusion in women’s everyday lives. The reality and possibility of the routine intrusions women experience from men in public space – from unwanted comments, to flashing, following and frottage – are frequently unaddressed in research, as well as in theoretical and policy-based responses to violence against women. Often at their height during women’s adolescence, (...)
  10. added 2017-11-06
    Non-Subjective Assemblages?: Foucault, Subjectivity, and Sexual Violence.Dianna Taylor - 2017 - Substance 46 (1):38-54.
    My way of no longer being what I am is the most singular part of what I am. In his 1975 Collège de France course, Abnormal, Michel Foucault analyzes the case of Charles Jouy, a nineteenth-century farmhand who, in 1867, was accused of sexually violating a young girl by the name of Sophie Adam.1 Foucault describes Jouy as a “marginal” figure, “more or less the village idiot”. Lacking relationships with adult women, Jouy sought out sexual encounters with young girls. Two (...)
  11. added 2017-11-06
    Autonomy and Reproductive Rights of Married Ikwerre Women in Rivers State, Nigeria.Chitu Womehoma Princewill, Ayodele Samuel Jegede, Tenzin Wangmo, Anita Riecher-Rössler & Bernice Simone Elger - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (2):205-215.
    A woman’s lack of or limited reproductive autonomy could lead to adverse health effects, feeling of being inferior, and above all being unable to adequately care for her children. Little is known about the reproductive autonomy of married Ikwerre women of Rivers State, Nigeria. This study demonstrates how Ikwerre women understand the terms autonomy and reproductive rights and what affects the exercise of these rights. An exploratory research design was employed for this study. A semi-structured interview schedule was used to (...)
  12. added 2017-11-06
    Surviving Evils and the Problem of Agency: An Essay Inspired by the Work of Claudia Card.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):539-557.
    Claudia Card did not live long enough to complete her work on surviving evils. Yet she left us an invaluable body of work on this topic. This paper surveys Card’s views about the nature of evils and the ethical quandaries of surviving them. It then develops an account of survival agency that is based on Card’s insights and in keeping with the agentic capacities exercised by Yezidi women and girls who have escaped from ISIS’s obscene program of trafficking in women (...)
  13. added 2017-11-06
    Juliette: A Model of Sexual Consent.Kavanagh Chandra - 2016 - Journal of the International Network for Sexual Ethics and Politics 4 (1):43-54.
    The ‘yes means yes’ model of sexual consent and the political and ethical commitments that underpin this model have three fundamental disadvantages. This position unfairly polices the sexual expression of participants; it demands an unreasonably high standard for defining sexual interaction as consensual; and by denying the body’s capacity for expressing sexual consent this model allows perpetrators of sexual violence to define consent. I argue that a critical examination of Marquis de Sade’s novel Juliette can provide the basis for a (...)
  14. added 2017-11-06
    Once There Was No Prison Rape: Ending Sexual Violence as Strategy for Prison Abolition.Jason M. Lydon - 2016 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 6 (1):61-71.
  15. added 2017-11-06
    Surviving Evils and the Problem of Agency: An Essay Inspired by the Work of Claudia Card.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (4-5):539-557.
    Claudia Card did not live long enough to complete her work on surviving evils. Yet she left us an invaluable body of work on this topic. This essay surveys Card's views about the nature of evils and the ethical quandaries of surviving them. It then develops an account of survival agency that is based on Card's insights and in keeping with the agentic capacities exercised by Yezidi women and girls who have escaped from ISIS's obscene program of trafficking in women (...)
  16. added 2017-11-06
    The Equivalent Valuation of Sexual Specificities. The Parchment for Inscribing Gender Justice to Come.Du Toit Louise - 2015 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 77 (1):27-54.
    In this article, the author argues that the road to gender justice must proceed through a renewed appreciation of the specifics of sexed embodiment. The problem is that there is no simple or pre-discursive material body to turn to. The lived, sexed body-subject confronts us with an infinite ethico-hermeneutical task, rather than a set of neatly contained and stable scientific facts. Drawing on insights from the feminist reception of the landmark 2001 ruling of the Hague ad hoc International Criminal Tribunal (...)
  17. added 2017-11-06
    Kristin Bumiller. In an Abusive State: How Neoliberalism Appropriated the Feminist Movement Against Sexual Violence. [REVIEW]Jennifer Suchland - 2014 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 4 (2):229-234.
  18. added 2017-11-06
    Sexual Autonomy and Violence Against Women.Sylvia Burrow - 2013 - In Chris Bailey (ed.), Talk About Sex: A Multidisciplinary Discussion. Sydney, NS: CBU Press.
  19. added 2017-11-06
    The Limits of Internalism: A Case Study: Dialogue.Karyn L. Freedman - 2010 - Dialogue 49 (1):73-89.
    ABSTRACT: Looking at specific populations of knowers reveals that the presumption of sameness within knowledge communities can lead to a number of epistemological oversights. A good example of this is found in the case of survivors of sexual violence. In this paper I argue that this case study offers a new perspective on the debate between the epistemic internalist and externalist by providing us with a fresh insight into the complicated psychological dimensions of belief formation and the implications that this (...)
  20. added 2017-11-06
    Discourses of Sexual Violence in a Global Framework.Linda Martín Alcoff - 2009 - Philosophical Topics 37 (2):123-139.
    In this paper I make a preliminary analysis of Western discourses on sexual violence, focusing on the important concepts of “consent” and “victim.” The concept of “consent” is widely used to determine whether sexual violence has occurred, and it is the focal point of debates over the legitimacy of statutory offenses and over the way we characterize sex work done under conditions involving economic desperation. The concept of “victim” is shunned by many feminists and nonfeminists alike for its apparent eclipse (...)
  21. added 2017-11-06
    Racism and Sexual Oppression in Anglo-America: A Genealogy.Ladelle McWhorter - 2009 - Indiana University Press.
    Does the black struggle for civil rights make common cause with the movement to foster queer community, protest anti-queer violence or discrimination, and demand respect for the rights and sensibilities of queer people? Confronting this emotionally charged question, Ladelle McWhorter reveals how a carefully structured campaign against abnormality in the late 19th and early 20th centuries encouraged white Americans to purge society of so-called biological contaminants, people who were poor, disabled, black, or queer. Building on a legacy of savage hate (...)
  22. added 2017-11-06
    Tradition's Desire: The Politics of Culture in the Rape Trial of Jacob Zuma.Thembisa Waetjen & Gerhard Maré - 2009 - Theoria: A Journal of Social and Political Theory 56 (120):63-81.
    This article examines the recent trial of ANC president Jacob Zuma, and how gender power was framed in respect to, and within, the politics of culture. The trial centred on allegations of rape by Zuma of an HIV positive woman many years his junior, who was also the daughter of a former anti-apartheid struggle comrade. All of these details were considered pertinent, not only to the legal debates about whether a crime had been committed, but also to the political debates (...)
  23. added 2017-11-06
    Regulating Aversion: Tolerance in the Age of Identity and Empire.Wendy Brown - 2008 - Princeton University Press.
    Tolerance is generally regarded as an unqualified achievement of the modern West. Emerging in early modern Europe to defuse violent religious conflict and reduce persecution, tolerance today is hailed as a key to decreasing conflict across a wide range of other dividing lines-- cultural, racial, ethnic, and sexual. But, as political theorist Wendy Brown argues in Regulating Aversion, tolerance also has dark and troubling undercurrents. Dislike, disapproval, and regulation lurk at the heart of tolerance. To tolerate is not to affirm (...)
  24. added 2017-11-06
    Islam and Women's Sexual Health and Rights in Senegal.Codou Bop - 2005 - Muslim World Journal of Human Rights 2 (1).
  25. added 2017-11-06
    A Violent Culture or Culturalized Violence?: Feminist Narratives of Sexual Violence Against South Asian Women.Sherene Razack - 2003 - Studies in Practical Philosophy 3 (1):80-104.
  26. added 2017-11-06
    Not an Indian Tradition: The Sexual Colonization of Native Peoples.Andrea Smith - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):70-85.
    This paper analyzes the connections between sexual violence and colonialism in the lives and histories of Native peoples in the United States. This paper argues that sexual violence does not simply just occur within the process of colonialism, but that colonialism is itself structured by the logic of sexual violence. Furthermore, this logic of sexual violence continues to structure U. S. policies toward Native peoples today. Consequently, anti-sexual violence and anti-colonial struggles cannot be separated.
  27. added 2017-11-06
    Oppression and Responsibility: A Wittgensteinian Approach to Social Practices and Moral Theory.Peg O'Connor - 2002 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Combating homophobia, racism, sexism, and other forms of discrimination and violence in our society requires more than just focusing on the overt acts of prejudiced and abusive individuals. The very intelligibility of such acts, in fact, depends upon a background of shared beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors that together form the context of social practices in which these acts come to have the meaning they do. This book, inspired by Wittgenstein as well as feminist and critical race theory, shines a critical (...)
  28. added 2017-11-06
    Gender and “Postmodern War”.Robin May Schott - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (4):19-29.
    In this essay I argue that war is not "above" gender analyses. I question in particular whether the concept of "postmodern war" is adequate to explain the intersections of gender with ethnicity and nationality, which underlie the sexual violence against women in wartime. The poststructuralist concept of the "fluidity" of the category of gender needs to be modified by an analysis of how "non-fluid" configurations of gender are entrenched in material conditions of existence.
  29. added 2017-11-06
    Preventing Violence Against Gay Men and Lesbians: Should Enhanced Penalties at Sentencing Extend to Bias Crimes Based on Victims' Sexual Orientation?Teresa Kibelstis - 1995 - Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 9 (1):309.
  30. added 2017-11-06
    Whose Right? Ronald Dworkin, Women, and Pornographers.Rae Langton - 1990 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 19 (4):311-359.
  31. added 2017-09-05
    Rape Myths and Domestic Abuse Myths as Hermeneutical Injustices.Katharine Jenkins - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):191-205.
    This article argues that rape myths and domestic abuse myths constitute hermeneutical injustices. Drawing on empirical research, I show that the prevalence of these myths makes victims of rape and of domestic abuse less likely to apply those terms to their experiences. Using Sally Haslanger's distinction between manifest and operative concepts, I argue that in these cases, myths mean that victims hold a problematic operative concept, or working understanding, which prevents them from identifying their experience as one of rape or (...)
  32. added 2017-09-05
    Hunting Girls: Sexual Violence From The Hunger Games to Campus Rape, by Kelly Oliver. [REVIEW]Debra Jackson - 2017 - Hypatia Reviews Online:nd.
  33. added 2017-02-15
    Sex in Utopia: Eutopian and Dystopian Sexual Relations.Lyman Tower Sargent & Lucy Sargisson - 2014 - Utopian Studies 25 (2):299-320.
    You can’t have good sex unless you’ve gotten a reasonable degree of social justice.Utopias and dystopias cover almost every imaginable subject, and Utopian scholars have discussed many of them, but while gender and gender relations have been considered at length, sex and sexual relations have not.1 And we would like to know what sex and sexual relations will be like in utopias and dystopias. Of course, the simple answer for eutopias—a lot of whatever we like best—and for dystopias—none of whatever (...)
  34. added 2017-02-15
    Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature. [REVIEW]Stephanie Trigg - 2004 - The Medieval Review 1.
  35. added 2017-02-15
    Sexual Identity and Sexual Justice.Jerome Neu - 1998 - Ethics 108 (3):586.
  36. added 2017-02-15
    Sexual Scenarios in Freud's Joke-Analysis.Karen Smythe - 1991 - Substance 20 (1):16.
  37. added 2017-02-14
    Remarks on the Sexual Politics of Reason.Sara Ruddick - 1987 - In Eva Feder Kittay & Diana T. Meyers (eds.), Women and Moral Theory. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 237--60.
  38. added 2017-02-13
    The Presumption of Innocence in Canonical Trials of Child Sexual Abuse, an Historical Analysis of the Current Law, by William Richardson.Ton Meijers - 2013 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 74 (2):169-170.
  39. added 2017-02-12
    What is Lost in the Constitution of Sexual Identity?Catherine Malabou - 2013 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 42 (1-3):61-74.
  40. added 2017-02-12
    The Queen and the `Bolton Seven'.Nick Dearden - 1999 - Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):317-332.
    This note examines the case of a group of gay men who, having engaged in consensual sexual acts together, became known as the `Bolton Seven' following their conviction in 1998 for offences of buggery and/or gross indecency. More particularly the note scrutinises the implications of the ages of the participants (one of whom, at 17 $\tfrac{1}{2}$ , was unable to give lawful consent to sexual intercourse with a man) in the light of the enactment of Part I of the Sex (...)
  41. added 2017-02-11
    Coming Too Late: Freud, Belatedness, and Existential Trauma.Andrew Barnaby - 2012 - Substance 41 (2):119-138.
  42. added 2017-02-10
    The Sexual Compact.Joan Copjec - 2012 - Angelaki 17 (2):31 - 48.
  43. added 2017-02-09
    Sexual Liberalism and Seduction.Eric M. Cave - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love: 1993-2003. Rodopi.
    According to sexual liberals, sexual activity is an activity like any other, properly governed by rules drawn from the set of justified moral rules governing all human activities, sexual and non-sexual alike. There are sexual liberals who claim that all sexual activity involving none of force, fraud, or taking advantage of the desperate circumstances of another is morally unproblematic. Here I shall argue that sexual liberalism ought not to be so permissive. Appealing to considerations of autonomy and consistency, I shall (...)
  44. added 2017-02-09
    Ecstatic Morality and Sexual Politics.Anthony E. Giampietro - 2009 - International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (3):401-402.
  45. added 2017-02-09
    Sexual Democracy.Sarah Begus - 1992 - Radical Philosophy Review of Books 1992 (6):32-39.
  46. added 2017-02-02
    Review of Ann Van Sevenant, Sexual Outercourse: Philosophy of Lovemaking[REVIEW]Nicholas P. Power - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (1).
  47. added 2017-02-02
    New Developments in Sexual Morality.Xavier Thévenot - 1984 - In Gregory Baum, John Aloysius Coleman & Marcus Lefébure (eds.), The Sexual Revolution. T. & T. Clark.
  48. added 2017-01-29
    Negligent Rape.David Archard - 1999 - Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 1 (2).
  49. added 2017-01-29
    Rape of the Wild.Joyce Contrucci & Judith Plant - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (1):198-206.
  50. added 2017-01-29
    Real Rape.Susan Estrich - 1989 - Ethics 99 (2):443-444.
1 — 50 / 424