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  1. Is It Wrong to Buy Sex?.Holly Lawford-Smith & Angie Pepper - 2024 - Routledge.
    Is it wrong for a man to buy sex from a woman? In this book, Holly Lawford-Smith argues that it is wrong: commercial sex is quintessentially hierarchical sex, and it is wrong both to have, and to perpetuate a market in, hierarchical sex. Angie Pepper argues that it isn’t wrong: men are permitted to buy sex from those women who freely choose to sell it. -/- Important but different interests are at stake in these two positions. According to the first, (...)
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  2. Después de la nada: dialéctica e ideología en la filosofía japonesa contemporánea.Montserrat Crespin Perales & Fernando Wirtz (eds.) - 2023 - Barcelona, España: Herder.
    La recepción y comprensión de la filosofía japonesa en el contexto académico hispanohablante todavía carece de una estructura coherente. Después de la nada intenta corregir algunos sesgos persistentes y subyacentes en los libros disponibles en español sobre filosofía japonesa: el nacionalismo metodológico, el criterio en la selección de los autores y la categorización de la transmisión del conocimiento de figuras, escuelas o textos de la contemporaneidad filosófica en Japón. De este modo, el valioso aporte de esta obra no es solo (...)
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  3. Sugar Babies: When “Feminism” Looks Like Online Misogyny.Filipa Melo Lopes - 2022 - Blog of the APA 2022.
  4. Sex, Love, and Gender: A Kantian Theory.Helga Varden - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    Sex, Love, and Gender is the first volume to present a comprehensive philosophical theory that brings together all of Kant's practical philosophy — found across his works on ethics, justice, anthropology, history, and religion — and provide a critique of emotionally healthy and morally permissible sexual, loving, gendered being. By rethinking Kant's work on human nature and making space for sex, love, and gender within his moral accounts of freedom, the book shows how, despite his austere and even anti-sex, cisist, (...)
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  5. Kant's moral theory and Feminist Ethics: Women, embodiment, care relations, and systemic injustice.Helga Varden - 2018 - In Pieranna Garavaso (ed.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Analytic Feminism. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 459-482.
    By setting the focus on issues of dependence and embodiment, feminist work has and continues to radically improve our understanding of Kant’s practical philosophy as one that is not (as it typically has been taken to be) about disembodied abstract rational agents. This paper outlines this positive development in Kant scholarship in recent decades by taking us from Kant’s own comments on women through major developments in Kant scholarship with regard to the related feminist issues. The main aim is to (...)
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  6. The Social Construction of Sexuality.Steven Seidman - 2015 - Contemporary Societies.
    In The Social Construction of Sexuality, Steven Seidman investigates the political and social consequences of privileging certain sexual practices and identities while stigmatizing others. Addressing a range of topics from gay and lesbian identities to sex work, Seidman delves into issues of social control that inform popular beliefs and moral standards. The new Third Edition features three new chapters that focus on the changing cultures of intimacy, the promise and perils of cyber intimacies, and youth struggles to negotiate independence and (...)
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  7. Sex and Selfhood: What Feminist Philosophy Can Learn from Recent Ethnography in Ho Chi Minh City.Mathew A. Foust - 2013 - Journal of International Women's Studies 14 (3):31-41.
    This article explores the connection of class dynamics to the moral agency of sex workers and their clients. It revisits the analyses of several contemporary feminist theorists, placing these analyses in dialogue with a recent ethnographic study of the sex work industry in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. In light of this comparative analysis, it is argued that accurate understanding and assessment of the moral agency of sex workers and their clients requires attunement to the complex and evolving class dynamics (...)
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  8. Rejecting the Choice Paradigm: Rethinking the Ethical Framework in Prostitution and Egg Sale Debates.H. Widdows - 2013 - In Sumi Madhok, Anne Phillips & Kalpana Wilson (eds.), Gender, agency, and coercion. New York, NY: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  9. Sex Trafficking and Worker Justice.Michelle Dempsey - 2012 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 9 (1):71-89.
  10. Overcoming Objectification: A Carnal Ethics.Ann J. Cahill - 2011 - Routledge.
    Objectification is a foundational concept in feminist theory, used to analyze such disparate social phenomena as sex work, representation of women's bodies, and sexual harassment. However, there has been an increasing trend among scholars of rejecting and re-evaluating the philosophical assumptions which underpin it. In this work, Cahill suggests an abandonment of the notion of objectification, on the basis of its dependence on a Kantian ideal of personhood. Such an ideal fails to recognize sufficiently the role the body plays in (...)
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  11. Vanessa E. Munro, Marina Della Giusta (eds): Demanding Sex: Critical Reflections on the Regulation of Prostitution. [REVIEW]Katie Cruz - 2009 - Feminist Legal Studies 17 (1):109-114.
  12. If no means no, does yes mean yes? Consenting to research intimacies.Julia O'Connell Davidson - 2008 - History of the Human Sciences 21 (4):49-67.
    This article reflects on some ethical dilemmas presented by an ethnographic study of prostitution that I conducted in the 1990s. The study drew one research subject into a long and very close relationship with me, and though she was an active and fully consenting participant in the research, she was also objectified within both the field relationship and the textual products it generated. This kind of contradiction has been recognized and discussed as a more general problem for ethnography by feminist (...)
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  13. Trafficking and Prostitution Reconsidered: New Perspectives on Migration, Sex Work, and Human Rights. Kamala Kempadoo with Jyoti Sanghera and Bandana Pattanaik.Rebecca Whisnant - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):209-215.
  14. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but it also (...)
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  15. Philosophical assumptions and presumptions about trafficking for prostitution.Donna Dickenson - 2006 - In Christien van den Anker & Jeroen Doomernik (eds.), Trafficking and women's rights. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 43-54.
    This chapter critically examines two frequently found assumptions in the debate about trafficking for prostitution: 1. That the sale of sexual services is like the sale of any other good or service; 2. That by and large women involved in trafficking for prostitution freely consent to sell such services.
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  16. Introduction: Sex, Money, and Philosophy.Jessica Spector - 2006 - In Prostitution and Pornography: Philosophical Debate About the Sex Industry. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. pp. 1-14.
  17. Obscene Undersides: Women and Evil between the Taliban and the United States.Mary Anne Franks - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):135-156.
    This paper proposes to supplement an American self-identity predicated on a model of absolute difference from the Taliban by exploring affinities between their respective ideologies. The place of “woman,” within and through the preponderance of sexual exploitation/violence common to both, is the starting point of this analysis. This article reads the two conflicting powers in a Lacanian/Žižekian dyad of the “Law” and its “obscene superego underside.”.
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  18. The Rights and Wrongs of Prostitution.Julia O'Connell Davidson - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):84-98.
    This essay critically explores contemporary Euro-American feminist debate on prostitution. It argues that to develop analyses relevant to the experience of more than just a small minority of “First World” women, those who are concerned with prostitution as a form of work need to look beyond liberal discourse on property and contractual consent for ways of conceptualizing the rights and wrongs of “sex work.”.
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  19. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book—domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling—but it also (...)
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  20. Sex and Social Justice.Patrick D. Hopkins - 2000 - Hypatia 17 (2):171-173.
  21. Resistance to prevention: Reconsidering feminist antiviolence rhetoric.Nadya Burton - 1998 - In Stanley G. French, Wanda Teays & Laura Martha Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press. pp. 182--200.
  22. Contested Commodities: The Trouble with Trade in Sex, Children, Body Parts, and Other ThingsMargaret Jane Radin Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1996, xiv + 279 pp., $35.00. [REVIEW]Robert K. Fullinwider - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (4):855-858.
    Although its title promises a discussion of such matters as prostitution, surrogate motherhood, and markets in blood and organs, this book by a professor of law at Stanford University is really a treatise on market rhetoric, not markets. Its target is the intellectual application of the tools of economic analysis to spheres of human life—such as sexual relations, family life, bodily integrity, and political commitment—that are purportedly structured by moral values and ideals rather than cold calculation of advantage. The “Chicago (...)
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  23. Contemporary Western Feminist Perspectives on Prostitution.Alison M. Jaggar - 1997 - Asian Journal of Women's Studies 3 (2):8-29.
    This paper contrasts two prominent positions in contemporary Western feminist discourse about prostitution. The first is radical feminism, which emerged in the early 1970s; the second is libertarian feminism, which emerged in the late 1980s. The paper analyses the underlying assumptions and public policy recommendation of each position; it argues that each illuminates important aspects of the situations of some prostitutes but ignores or denies others. An approach to prostitution capable of providing an adequate guide to public policy must be (...)
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  24. Whores and Other Feminists.Jill Nagle - 1997 - Psychology Press.
  25. Reading, Writing, and Rewriting the Prostitute Body.Shannon Bell - 1994 - Indiana University Press.
    "I found this a fascinating book: wide-ranging, readable." —Alison Jaggar Bell shows how the flesh-and-blood female body engaged in sexual interaction for payment has no inherent meaning and is signified differently in different cultures ...
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  26. Review: Response to Claudia Card and Marilyn Friedman. [REVIEW]Janice G. Raymond - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (2):139 - 143.
    This essay is a response to the comments and critique, included in this issue, of Claudia Card and Marilyn Friedman to my book, A Passion for Friends. In this response, I emphasize the crucial distinction between female separation and dissociation from the world, so as to register the difference between the positive and negative separations in which women are engaged. I also expand the discussion of individuality and individualism. The latter has arisen within the context of a feminist liberal campaign (...)
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  27. Prostitution.Alison Jaggar - 1980 - In Alan Soble (ed.), Readings in the Philosophy of Sex. Littlefield, Adams & Co.