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  1. added 2018-03-13
    Resisting Body Oppression: An Aesthetic Approach.Sherri Irvin - 2017 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 3 (4):1-26.
    Open Access: This article argues for an aesthetic approach to resisting oppression based on judgments of bodily unattractiveness. Philosophical theories have often suggested that appropriate aesthetic judgments should converge on sets of objects consensually found to be beautiful or ugly. The convergence of judgments about human bodies, however, is a significant source of injustice, because people judged to be unattractive pay substantial social and economic penalties in domains such as education, employment and criminal justice. The injustice is compounded by the (...)
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  2. added 2018-03-02
    New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment.Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal - 2018 - London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan.
    Despite several decades of feminist activism and scholarship, women’s bodies continue to be sites of control and contention both materially and symbolically. Issues such as reproductive technologies, sexual violence, objectification, motherhood, and sex trafficking, among others, constitute ongoing, pressing concerns for women’s bodies in our contemporary milieu, arguably exacerbated in a neoliberal world where bodies are instrumentalized as sites of human capital. This book engages with these themes by building on the strong tradition of feminist thought focused on women’s bodies, (...)
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  3. added 2018-03-02
    Revisiting Feminist Matters in the Post-Linguistic Turn: John Dewey, New Materialisms, and Contemporary Feminist Thought.Clara Fischer - 2018 - In Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.), New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment. London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 83-102.
    In this chapter, I sketch some recent developments in feminist thought and present these alongside John Dewey’s work to assess what place pragmatism might assume in debates on contemporary, post-linguistic turn feminism. My task for this chapter is threefold: I redress the elision of pragmatism in the conversation around affect theory, new materialisms, and contemporary feminist theorising; I trace some of the confluences between Dewey’s work on nature and materiality, and the new materialist work of Stacy Alaimo and Karen Barad; (...)
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  4. added 2018-03-02
    Contested Terrains: New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment.Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal - 2018 - In Clara Fischer & Luna Dolezal (eds.), New Feminist Perspectives on Embodiment. London, New York: Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 1-13.
    Feminist theory and philosophy has evinced an ongoing scholarly interest in the body and embodiment. Corporeal feminism, as it has been called by some, theorises the effects of patriarchal power structures on the female body, and hence, on women’s subjectivity and social position. As we progress into the 21st Century, despite several decades of feminist activism and scholarship, women’s bodies continue to be sites of control and contention both materially and symbolically. Issues such as reproductive rights and technologies, sexual violence, (...)
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  5. added 2018-02-17
    Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  6. added 2018-02-17
    The (In) Visible Body: Feminism, Phenomenology, and the Case of Cosmetic Surgery.Luna Dolezal - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):357-375.
    This paper will examine the experience of and drive for boaly invisibility in women through the theoretical approaches of phenomenology and social constructionism. An examination of the social disruptions of bodily invisibility and the compulsive avoidance of such instances, particuhrly with respect to the fastidious maintenance of body comportment and appearance within the narrow parameters afforded by social norms, will lead to an exploration of the conflation of biomedicine with the beauty industry.
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  7. added 2018-02-17
    Mere and Partial Means: The Full Range of the Objectification of Women.Carolyn McLeod - 2002 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (Supplement):219-244.
    The main aims of the paper are to explain how objectification admits of degrees and why a significant portion of the objectification of women in contemporary Western society - objectification that contributes to their oppression - is what I call "partial objectification." To acknowledge the full range of objectification in women's lives, feminists need a theory of how objectification can be degreed. They need to be able to say that women can be both bosom and legitimate job candidate, both breeder (...)
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  8. added 2018-02-17
    Disciplining Foucault: Feminism, Power, and the Body.Jana Sawicki - 1991 - Routledge.
  9. added 2018-02-02
    Body Art and Performance: The Body as Language.Lea Vergine - 2000 - Milan: Skira Editore S.p.A..
    When The Body as Language ("Body-art" and Performance) appeared in 1974, it was immediately a huge publishing hit, reviewed by some of the most influential art historians and writers (Giulio C. Argan, Edoardo Sanguineti, Max Kozloff, Lucy Lippard, François Pluchart, Peter Gorsen, Evelyn Weiss and many others). A direct testimony of the birth and development of one of the most controversial art trends, Lea Vergine's book avails of a series of texts by the artists themselves, whom the author had asked (...)
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  10. added 2018-01-01
    Abortion: Is the Fetus Human?Rochelle Marianne Forrester - unknown
    This paper addresses the question of whether the fetus is human and its effect on the abortion debate. It investigates the concept of “human” and asks whether the concept of human has an essence or is best understood by the idea of family resemblance. It asks whether DNA is the essence of humanity and concludes that it is not and that humanity is best understood using family resemblance involving a range of attributes common to humans. It concludes the fetus does (...)
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  11. added 2017-08-07
    Beauty Unlimited.Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.) - 2013 - Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
    Emphasizing the human body in all of its forms, Beauty Unlimited expands the boundaries of what is meant by beauty both geographically and aesthetically. Peg Zeglin Brand and an international group of contributors interrogate the body and the meaning of physical beauty in this multidisciplinary volume. This striking and provocative book explores the history of bodily beautification; the physicality of socially or culturally determined choices of beautification; the interplay of gender, race, class, age, sexuality, and ethnicity within and on the (...)
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  12. added 2017-08-07
    The Aesthetics of Childbirth.Peg Brand & Paula Granger - 2012 - In Sheila Lintott & Maureen Sander-Staudt (eds.), Philosophical Inquiries into Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Mothering: Maternal Subjects. Routledge. pp. 215-236.
    Images abound of women throughout the ages engaging in various activities. But why are there so few representations of childbirth in visual art? Feminist artist Judy Chicago once suggested that depictions of women giving birth do not commonly occur in Western culture but can be found in other contexts such as pre-Columbian art or societies previously considered "primitive." Chicago's own exploration of the theme resulted in the creation of The Birth Project (1980-85): an unprecedented series of eighty handcrafted works of (...)
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  13. added 2017-07-14
    From Sanitation to Liberation: The Modern and Postmodern Marketing of Menstrual Products.Shelley M. Park - 1996 - Journal of Popular Culture 30 (2):149-68.
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  14. added 2017-06-18
    Feminism and the Matter of Bodies: From de Beauvoir to Butler.Alex Hughes & Anne Witz - 1997 - Body and Society 3 (1):47-60.
  15. added 2017-03-17
    Digestion, Habit, and Being at Home: Hegel and the Gut as Ambiguous Other.Jane Dryden - 2016 - PhaenEx 11 (2):1-22.
    Recent work in the philosophy of biology argues that we must rethink the biological individual beyond the boundary of the species, given that a key part of our essential functioning is carried out by the bacteria in our intestines in a way that challenges any strictly genetic account of what is involved for the biological human. The gut is a kind of ambiguous other within our understanding of ourselves, particularly when we also consider the status of gastro-intestinal disorders. Hegel offers (...)
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  16. added 2017-02-15
    Going Down': Oral Sex, Imaginary Bodies and HIV.Celia Roberts, Susan Kippax, Mary Spongberg & June Crawford - 1996 - Body and Society 2 (3):107-124.
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  17. added 2017-02-14
    Grosz, The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution and the Untimely.W. E. Connolly - 2006 - Political Theory 34 (5):663.
  18. added 2017-02-11
    The Danger of Identification: A Review of Self-Transformations: Foucault, Ethics, and Normalized Bodies by Cressida J. Heyes. [REVIEW]Shannon Winnubst - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (1):224 - 228.
  19. added 2017-02-11
    The Body at Century's End.Martina Reuter - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  20. added 2017-01-27
    Elizabeth Grosz. Space, Time and Perversion.A. Ainley - 1997 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 14:205-206.
  21. added 2017-01-24
    What Her Body Thought: A Journey Into the Shadows (Review).Abby L. Wilkerson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):155-160.
  22. added 2017-01-22
    Elizabeth Grosz: Volatile Bodies.Ruth Noack - 1996 - Die Philosophin 7 (13):117-119.
  23. added 2017-01-18
    A Queer Supplement: Reading Spinoza After Grosz.Catherine Mary Dale - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):1-12.
    : This article critiques Elizabeth Grosz's understanding that queer theory is unproductive insofar as it disrupts the specific identities of gay and lesbian. Reconsidering ideas about desire, the body, and identity that Grosz takes from Gilles Deleuze's work on Friedrich Nietzsche and Baruch Spinoza, this essay argues that, despite her productive reworking of homophobia in terms of "active" and "reactive" forces, Grosz's application of Spinoza is only partial. Focusing on Spinoza's evaluation of bodies, the essay both critiques Grosz's approach to (...)
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  24. added 2017-01-15
    From Radical Representations to Corporeal Becomings: The Feminist Philosophy of Lloyd, Grosz, and Gatens.Claire Colebrook - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):76-93.
    Contrasting the work of Genevieve Lloyd, Elizabeth Grosz, and Moira Gatens with the poststructuralist philosophy of Judith Butler, this paper identifies a distinctive "Australian" feminism. It argues that while Butler remains trapped by the matter/representation binary, the Spinozist turn in Lloyd and Gatens, and Grosz's work on Bergson and Deleuze, are attempts to think corporeality.
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  25. added 2017-01-15
    Book Review: Moira Gatens. Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality. New York: Routledge, 1996. [REVIEW]Carolyn Dipalma - 1997 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 12 (4):217-222.
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  26. added 2017-01-15
    Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power, and Corporeality.Moira Gatens - 1995 - Routledge.
    Moira Gatens investigates the ways in which differently sexed bodies can occupy the same social or political space. Representations of sexual difference have unacknowledged philosophical roots which cannot be dismissed as a superficial bias on the part of the philosopher, nor removed without destroying the coherence of the philosophical system concerned. The deep structural bias against women extends beyond metaphysics and its effects are felt in epistemology, moral, social and political theory. The idea of sexual difference is contextualised in _Imaginary (...)
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  27. added 2017-01-06
    Contemporary Representations of the Female Body: Consumerism and the Normative Discourse of Beauty.Venera Dimulescu - 2015 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 2 (4): 505–514.
    In the context of the perpetual reproduction of consumerism in contemporary western societies, the varied and often contradictory principles of third wave feminism have been misunderstood or redefined by the dominant economic discourse of the markets. The lack of homogeneity in the theoretical debates of the third wave feminism seems to be a vulnerable point in the appropriation of its emancipatory ideals by the post-modern consumerist narratives. The beauty norm, particularly, brings the most problematic questions forth in the contemporary feminist (...)
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  28. added 2016-12-12
    Volatile Bodies: Toward a Corporeal Feminism.Elizabeth Grosz - 1994 - Indiana University Press.
    "The location of the author’s investigations, the body itself rather than the sphere of subjective representations of self and of function in cultures, is wholly new.... I believe this work will be a landmark in future feminist thinking." —Alphonso Lingis "This is a text of rare erudition and intellectual force. It will not only introduce feminists to an enriching set of theoretical perspectives but sets a high critical standard for feminist dialogues on the status of the body." —Judith Butler Volatile (...)
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  29. added 2016-12-08
    It’s My Body and I’Ll Do What I Like With It.Anne Phillips - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (6):724-748.
    What, if any, is the problem with treating bodies as objects or property? Is there a defensible basis for seeing bodies as different from "other" material resources? Or is thinking the body special a kind of sentimentalism that blocks clear thinking about matters such as prostitution, surrogate motherhood, and the sale of spare kidneys? I argue that the language we use does matter, and that thinking of the body as property encourages a self/body dualism that obscures the power relations involved (...)
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  30. added 2016-12-08
    Sex and Enhancement: A Phenomenological-Existential View.Guy Widdershoven, Annemie Halsema & Jenny Slatman - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (7):20-22.
  31. added 2016-12-08
    Ethics, the Body, and the Postmodern Feminist.Juan M. Hernandezs - 2008 - Ethics and Behavior 18 (1):115-117.
  32. added 2016-12-08
    The Power of Spinoza: Feminist Conjunctions.Genevieve Lloyd & Moira Gatens - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):40 - 58.
    As a constructive alternative to the exclusionary binaries of Cartesian philosophy, Genevieve Lloyd and Moira Gatens turn to Spinoza. Spinoza's understanding of the body as "in relation" takes the focus of philosophical thought from the homogeneous subject to the heterogeneity of the social, and the focus of politics from individual rights to collective responsibility. The implications for feminism are radical; Spinoza enables a reconceptualization of the imaginary and the possibility of a sociability of inclusion.
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  33. added 2016-12-08
    Philosophy and the Maternal Body: Reading Silence.Michelle Boulous Walker - 1998 - Routledge.
    _Philosophy and the Maternal Body_ gives a new voice to the mother and the maternal body which have often been viewed as silent within philosophy. Michelle Boulous Walker clearly shows how some male theorists have appropriated maternity, and suggests new ways of articulating the maternal body and women's experience of pregnancy and motherhood.
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  34. added 2016-12-05
    An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy.Alison Stone - 2007 - Polity.
    This is the first book to offer a systematic account of feminist philosophy as a distinctive field of philosophy. The book introduces key issues and debates in feminist philosophy including: the nature of sex, gender, and the body; the relation between gender, sexuality, and sexual difference; whether there is anything that all women have in common; and the nature of birth and its centrality to human existence. An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy shows how feminist thinking on these and related topics (...)
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  35. added 2016-12-05
    Perspectives on Embodiment: The Intersections of Nature and Culture.Gail Weiss & Honi Fern Haber (eds.) - 1999 - Routledge.
    First published in 1999. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  36. added 2016-11-30
    Doctor's Orders: Menopause, Weight Change, and Feminism.Kathryn J. Norlock - 2016 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):190-197.
    “I am still in despair over losing my identity,” said a blog comment in a discussion about post-menopause weight gain. Instead of recovering an identity, for some of us, as women age, our attitudes toward fitness may require forging new identities. But the challenge in coming to desire fitness, post-menopause, is a project of actually changing my desires. Habituating a good practice can lead to a change in our appetites, so that instead of losing our identities, we may become the (...)
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  37. added 2016-10-27
    Moralities of Self-Renunciation and Obedience: The Later Foucault and Disciplinary Power Relations.Cory Wimberly - 2011 - Philosophy Today 55 (1):37-49.
    This essay develops a new account of the work the self must perform on itself in disciplinary relations through the cultivation of resources from Foucault’s later work. By tracing the ethical self-relation from Greco-Roman antiquity to the Benedictine monastery, I am able to provide insight into the relationship of self-renunciation that underlies disciplinary docility and obedience. This self-renunciation undermines individuals’ ability to lead themselves and makes them reliant on another who has mastery of the truth through which the subject must (...)
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  38. added 2016-08-11
    Sexuality Situated: Beauvoir on "Frigidity".Sue L. Cataldi - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):70-82.
    This essay relates scenes from Beauvoir's novels to her views of female eroticism and frigidity in The Second Sex. Expressions of frigidity signal unjust power relations in Beauvoir's literature. She constructs frigidity as a symbolic means of rejecting dominance in heterosexual relations. Thus frigidity need not be interpreted, as it sometimes is, as a form of bad faith. The essay concludes with some thoughts on the relevance of Beauvoir's view of frigidity to contemporary feminism.
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  39. added 2016-08-10
    The Normative Importance of Pregnancy Challenges Surrogacy Contracts.Anca Gheaus - 2016 - Analize. Journal of Gender and Feminist Studies 6 (20):20-31.
    Birth mothers usually have a moral right to parent their newborns in virtue of a mutual attachment formed, during gestation, between the gestational mother and the fetus. The attachment is formed, in part, thanks to the burdens of pregnancy, and it serves the interest of the newborn; the gestational mother, too, has a powerful interest in the protection of this attachment. Given its justification, the right to parent one's gestated baby cannot be transferred at will to other people who would (...)
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  40. added 2016-08-09
    Feminist Politics and Fetal Surgery: Adventures of a Research Cowgirl on the Reproductive Frontier.Monica J. Casper - 1997 - Feminist Studies 23 (2):232.
  41. added 2016-08-03
    Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  42. added 2016-07-31
    WHO Collaborative Studies on Breastfeeding.M. Carballo - 1977 - Journal of Biosocial Science 9 (S4):83-89.
  43. added 2016-06-13
    Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law.Joan Callahan, Laura Purdy & Kathy Rudy - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  44. added 2016-06-13
    Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage.V. J. Callan - 1986 - Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  45. added 2016-06-01
    Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification.Ann J. Cahill - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's equality (...)
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  46. added 2016-05-31
    Resistance to Prevention: Reconsidering Feminist Antiviolence Rhetoric.Nadya Burton - 1998 - In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press. pp. 182--200.
  47. added 2016-05-19
    Feminine Stubble.Rachel Burgess - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):230-237.
  48. added 2016-05-17
    Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book-domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling-but it also (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-17
    Feminist Perspectives on the Body.Barbara Brook, Gail Weiss, Honi Fern Haber, Jane Arthurs & Jean Grimshaw - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  50. added 2016-05-17
    Mary Astell: Defender of the “Disembodied Mind”.Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40-62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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