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  1. Queer Death Studies: Coming to Terms with Death, Dying and Mourning Differently. An Introduction.Marietta Radomska, Tara Mehrabi & Nina Lykke - 2019 - Women, Gender and Research 2019 (3-4):3-11.
    Queer Death Studies (QDS) refers to an emerging transdisciplinary field of research that critically and (self) reflexively investigates and challenges conventional normativities, assumptions, expectations, and regimes of truths that are brought to life and made evident by death, dying, and mourning. Since its establishment as a research field in the 1970s, Death Studies has drawn attention to the questions of death, dying, and mourning as complex and multifaceted phenomena that require inter- or multi-disciplinary approaches and perspectives. Yet, the engagements with (...)
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  2. Criticism and Compassion: The Ethics and Politics of Claudia Card.Robin S. Dillon & Robin S. Dillon and Armen Marsoobian (eds.) - 2018 - Blackwell.
    Claudia Card had a long and distinguished career as a philosopher that began at a time when being a woman in philosophy was not an easy matter and ended much too soon with her passing in 2015. Starting with her first and still widely-cited article, “On Mercy,” she published ten monographs and edited volumes and nearly 150 articles and reviews on topics in moral, social, and political philosophy. She is is most widely known for her influential work in analytic feminist (...)
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  3. Gender Integration in the Military: A Rawlsian Approach.Mark N. Jensen - 2016 - Hypatia 31 (4):844-857.
    Following the recent decisions by Western militaries to pursue greater integration of women into combat roles, this paper examines the principles that motivate integration and organizes them into a theoretically coherent scheme that could serve as a roadmap for policymakers as they rebuild military institutions and their combat units in an integrated fashion. The strategy of the paper is Rawlsian: the right relationship between the principles that motivate integration can be derived through an application of Rawls's methodology as described in (...)
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  4. The Traffic in Women Reconsidered.Ann V. Murphy - 2015 - Philosophy Today 59 (2):345-354.
  5. Gender, Agency and War: The Maternalized Body in U.S. Foreign Policy.Max J. Skidmore - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (3):315-317.
  6. The Feminist Pacifism of William James and Mary Whiton Calkins.Mathew A. Foust - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (4):889-905.
    In this paper, I accompany William James and Mary Whiton Calkins in the steps each takes toward his or her respective proposal of a moral equivalent of war. I demonstrate the influence of James upon Calkins, suggesting that the two share overlapping formulations of the problem and offer closely related—but significantly different—solutions. I suggest that Calkins's pacifistic proposal is an extension of that of her teacher—a feminist interpretation of his psychological and moral thought as brought to bear on the problem (...)
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  7. Domestic Abuse as Terrorism.Jay Sloan‐Lynch - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (4):774-790.
    A number of philosophers and feminist authors have recently equated domestic abuse with the ubiquitous and ill-defined concept of “terrorism.” Claudia Card, for instance, argues that domestic abuse is a frequently ignored form of terrorism that creates and maintains “heterosexual male dominance and female dependence and service”. Alison Jaggar, in a recent article, also concludes that an acceptable definition of terrorism will find rape and domestic violence to be terrorist acts. Yet there seem to be several obstacles to any simple (...)
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  8. Feminist Approaches to Religion and Torture.Christine E. Gudorf - 2011 - Journal of Religious Ethics 39 (4):613-621.
    Feminists look critically at any infliction of pain on others, usually requiring that it be consensual, and often both consensual and for the benefit of the person afflicted. Most torture of women is not recognized under official definitions of torture because it is not performed by or with the consent of (government) officials. Women are, however, also victims of torture under official definitions as military or civilian prisoners or as members of defeated populations in war, and are more often subjected (...)
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  9. States of Violence: An Essay on the End of War. [REVIEW]Apple Igrek - 2011 - Foucault Studies:206-209.
  10. Media Representations of Women and the “Iraq War”.Kelly Oliver - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 5 (12):14-22.
    This essay examines media images of women in recent conflicts in the Middle East. From the Abu Ghraib prison abuses to protests in Iran, women have become the public face of violence, carried out and suffered. Women’s bodies are figured as sexual and violent, a potent combination that stirs public imagination and feeds into stereotypes of women as femme fatales or “bombshells.”.
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  11. Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media. By KELLY OLIVER.Danielle Poe - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (2):469-472.
  12. In a Time of Terror: Globalisation, Transformation and the Enlightenment.Raymond Aaron Younis - 2009 - In Philip Quadrio Carrol Besseling (ed.), Politics and religion in the new century: philosophical reflections. Sydney: Sydney University Press. pp. 233-258.
    A critical analysis and evaluation of Habermas' and Derrida's understanding of terrorism (in particular 9/11); some reflections on the role of philosophy and philosophers in the present age.
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  13. Introduction: Thinking About War.Bar On Bat-Ami - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2).
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  14. Care Ethics and Dependence— Rethinking Jus Post Bellum.Sigal Ben-Porath - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 61-71.
    In this essay, Ben-Porath begins from the assumption that just war theory should be extended to include a jus post bellum component. Postwar conduct should be significantly informed by a care ethics perspective, particularly its political aspects as developed by Joan Tronto and others. Care ethics should be extended to the international postwar arena with one significant amendment, namely, weakening the aim of ending dependence.
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  15. Care Ethics and Dependence—Rethinking Jus Post Bellum.Sigal Ben-Porath - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):61-71.
    In this essay, Ben-Porath begins from the assumption that just war theory should be extended to include a jus post bellum component. Postwar conduct should be significantly informed by a care ethics perspective, particularly its political aspects as developed by Joan Tronto and others. Care ethics should be extended to the international postwar arena with one significant amendment, namely, weakening the aim of ending dependence.
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  16. The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices.Debra B. Bergoffen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
    This essay argues that the ambiguities of the just war tradition, sifted through a feminist critique, provides the best framework currently available for translating the ethical entitlement to human dignity into concrete feminist political practices. It offers a gendered critique of war that pursues the just war distinction between legitimate and illegitimate targets of wartime violence and provides a gendered analysis of the peace which the just war tradition obliges us to preserve and pursue.
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  17. The Human Rights of Others: Sovereignty, Legitimacy, and “Just Causes” for the “War on Terror”.Margaret Denike - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):95-121.
    In this essay, Denike assesses the appropriation of international human rights by humanitarian law and policy of “security states.” She maps representations of the perpetrators and victims of “tyranny” and “terror,” and their role in providing a “just cause” for the U.S.-led “war on terror.” By examining narratives of progress and human rights heroism Denike shows how human rights discourses, when used together with the pretense of self-defense and preemptive war, do the opposite of what they claim—entrenching the sovereignty of (...)
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  18. The Human Rights of Others: Sovereignty, Legitimacy, and "Just Causes" for the "War on Terror".Margaret Denike - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 95-121.
    In this essay, Denike assesses the appropriation of international human rights by humanitarian law and policy of "security states." She maps representations of the perpetrators and victims of "tyranny" and "terror, " and their role in providing a "just cause" for the U.S.–led "war on terror. " By examining narratives of progress and human rights heroism Denike shows how human rights discourses, when used together with the pretense of self-defense and preemptive war, do the opposite of what they claim—entrenching the (...)
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  19. “The Stigma of Nation”: Feminist Just War, Privilege, and Responsibility.Marian Eide - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 48-60.
    If women are not yet accorded the full rights of citizenship internationally and especially in the military context, a feminist position on just war may have to be provisional. Drawing on Virginia Woolf's argument referenced in the title, Eide suggests in this essay that feminist theory develop its principles from women's exclusion from national privileges and argues that jus post bellum or justice after war be central to feminist theories of just war.
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  20. Women: The Secret Weapon of Modern Warfare?Kelly Oliver - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 1-16.
    The images from wars in the Middle East that haunt us are those of young women killing and torturing. Their media circulated stories share a sense of shock. They have both galvanized and confounded debates over feminism and women's equality. And, as Oliver argues in this essay, they share, perhaps subliminally, the problematic notion of women as both offensive and defensive weapons of war, a notion that is symptomatic of fears of women's "mysterious" powers.
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  21. Women: The Secret Weapon of Modern Warfare?Kelly Oliver - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):1-16.
    The images from wars in the Middle East that haunt us are those of young women killing and torturing. Their media circulated stories share a sense of shock. They have both galvanized and confounded debates over feminism and women's equality. And, as Oliver argues in this essay, they share, perhaps subliminally, the problematic notion of women as both offensive and defensive weapons of war, a notion that is symptomatic of fears of women's “mysterious” powers.
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  22. The Opposition of Politics and War.Bat-ami Bar On - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):141-154.
    At stake for this essay is the distinction between politics and war and the extent to which politics can survive war. Gender analysis reveals how high these stakes are by revealing the complexity of militarism. It also reveals the impossibility of gender identity as foundation for a more robust politics with respect to war. Instead, a non-ideal normative differentiation among kinds of violence is affirmed as that which politically cannot not be wanted.
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  23. The Opposition of Politics and War.Bat-ami Bar On - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):141-154.
    At stake for this essay is the distinction between politics and war and the extent to which politics can survive war. Gender analysis reveals how high these stakes are by revealing the complexity of militarism. It also reveals the impossibility of gender identity as foundation for a more robust politics with respect to war. Instead, a non-ideal normative differentiation among kinds of violence is affirmed as that which politically cannot not be wanted.
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  24. Introduction: Thinking About War.Bat-ami Bar On - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):vii-xv.
  25. Replacing Just War Theory with an Ethics of Sexual Difference.Danielle Poe - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 33-47.
    This essay argues that the flaws of just war theory should lead us to develop a new approach to living with others. Danielle Poe begins her argument with a description of just war theory and its failures. In the next section, Poe discusses the philosophy of Bat-Ami Bar On and Luce Irigaray in order to construct ethical commitments between people. These ethical commitments come from concrete acts of empathy, such as relationships of compassion, kindness, and hospitality. Finally, Poe considers how (...)
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  26. Women as Weapons of War: Iraq, Sex, and the Media (Review).Jennifer Purvis - 2008 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (4):pp. 316-319.
  27. Just War and the Problem of Evil.Robin May Schott - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):122-140.
    In this essay, Robin May Schott criticizes leading proponents of just war theory and introduces the notion of justifiable but illegitimate violence. Instead of legitimating some wars as just, it is better to acknowledge that both the situation of war and moral judgments about war are ambiguous. Schott raises the questions: What are alternative narratives of war? And what are alternative narratives to war? Such narratives are necessary for addressing the concepts of evil and of witnessing in the ethical discourse (...)
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  28. Just War and the Problem of Evil.Robin May Schott - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 122-140.
    In this essay, Robin May Schott criticizes leading proponents of just war theory and introduces the notion of justifiable but illegitimate violence. Instead of legitimating some wars as just, it is better to acknowledge that both the situation of war and moral judgments about war are ambiguous. Schott raises the questions: What are alternative narratives of war? And what are alternative narratives to war? Such narratives are necessary for addressing the concepts of evil and of witnessing in the ethical discourse (...)
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  29. Beauvoir, Hegel, War.Meryl Altman - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):66-91.
    The importance of Hegel to the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir, both to her early philosophical texts and to The Second Sex, is usually discussed in terms of the master-slave dialectic and a Kojève-influenced reading, which some see her as sharing with Sartre, others persuasively describe as divergent from and corrective to Sartre's. Altman shows that Hegel's influence on Beauvoir's work is also wider, both in terms of what she takes on board and what she works through and rejects, and (...)
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  30. War, Women, and Political Wisdom: Jean Bethke Elshtain on the Contours of Justice. [REVIEW]J. Daryl Charles - 2006 - Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (2):339 - 369.
    One of the most perceptive and ambidextrous social commentators of our day, Augustinian scholar Jean Bethke Elshtain furnishes in ever fresh ways through her writings a bridge between the ancient and the modern, between politics and ethics, between timeless moral wisdom and cultural sensitivity. To read Elshtain seriously is to take the study of culture as well as the "permanent things" seriously. But Elshtain is no mere moralist. Neither is she content solely to dwell in the domain of the theoretical. (...)
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  31. How America Justifies Its War: A Modern/Postmodern Aesthetics of Masculinity and Sovereignty.Bonnie Mann - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):147-163.
    The lies about the reasons for the U.S. war against Iraq provoked no mass public outcry in the United States against the war. What is the process of justification for this war, a process that seems to need no reasons? Mann argues that the process of justification is not a process of rational deliberation but one of aesthetic self-constitution, of rebuilding a masculine national identity. Included is a feminist reading of the National Defense University document Shock and Awe.
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  32. The Philosopher Queen: Feminist Essays on War, Love, and Knowledge.Alison Bailey - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):218-221.
  33. Philosophical Sisters, Incite!Chris J. Cuomo - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):235 - 238.
    Feminists of a philosophical sort, lovers of women and wisdom, political critics and witnesses! What unusual and important opportunities we face as we bring the lessons of the last few years to bear on complex theorizing, multi-issue praxis, and the work of twenty-first century democracy. We've been on the streets, in th classroom, and on the Internet, opposing war and occupation, protesting police brutality, demanding global peace and justice. We've helped organize teach-ins and lectures, meetings and potlucks, concerts and art (...)
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  34. Britische Kriegsspiele 1916/2002. Repräsentationen soldatischer und nationaler Traumata des Ersten Weltkriegs. Ein wissenschaftlicher Film und eine BBC-Documentary.Julia Barbara Köhne - 2004 - Die Philosophin 15 (30):95-108.
  35. A Catholic Feminist Perspective on Pacem in Terris: Women, Children, and War.Maura A. Ryan - 2004 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 1 (1):67-82.
  36. The Atrocity Paradigm and the Concept of Forgiveness.Robin May Schott - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (4):204 - 211.
    In this article I discuss Claudia Card's treatment of war rape in relation to her discussion of the victim's moral power of forgiveness. I argue that her analysis of the victim's power to withhold forgiveness overlooks the paradoxical structure of witnessing, which implies that there is an ungraspable dimension of atrocity. In relation to this ungraspable element, the proposal that victims of atrocity have the power to either offer or withhold forgiveness may have little relevance.
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  37. Questions Regarding a War on Terrorism.Claudia Card - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):164 - 169.
    : The concept of a war on terrorism creates havoc with attempts to apply rules of war. For "terrorism" is not an agent. Nor is it clear what relationship to terrorism agents must have in order to be legitimate targets. Nor is it clear what kinds of terrorism count. Would a war on terrorism in the home be a justifiable response to domestic battering? If not, do similar objections apply to a war on public terrorism?
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  38. Facing Our Humanity.Drucilla Cornell - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):170 - 174.
    : This article argues that U.S. aggression against Afghanistan must be challenged through our support of the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) and their political program. It does so not only by considering competing judgments about what constitutes women's rights, but also through an appeal to the Kantian ideal of humanity and its relation to how we can re-think both terrorism and the treatment of those accused of terrorist activity.
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  39. Responding to the Evil of Terrorism.Alison M. Jaggar - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):175 - 182.
    In this paper, I distinguish terrorism from other crimes and from war, noting that terrorism may be perpetrated not only by private individuals and members of nonstate organizations, but also that it may be ordered by the state. Since terrorism is illegal almost everywhere, I argue that the proper response to it is usually through law enforcement rather than military measures. In some circumstances, however, I content that even law enforcement procedures may be used by the state to terrorize civilians. (...)
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  40. The Subject of Violence: Arendtean Exercises in Understanding.Margaret A. McLaren - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):205-208.
  41. Terrorism, Evil, and Everyday Depravity.Bat-ami Bar On - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):157-163.
    This essay expresses ambivalence about the use of the term "evil" in analyses of terrorism in light of the association of the two in speeches intended to justify the United States' "war on terrorism." At the same time, the essay suggests that terrorism can be regarded as "evil" but only when considered among a multiplicity of "evils" comparable to it, for example: rape, war crimes, and repression.
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  42. Humanity: A Moral History of the Twentieth Century.Margrit Shildrick - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (2):227-229.
  43. Mothers and Soldiers: Gender, Citizenship, and Civil Society in Contemporary Russia.Amy B. Caiazza & Amin Caiazza - 2002 - Routledge.
  44. How America Justifies Its War: A Modern/Postmodern Aesthetics of Masculinity and Sovereignty.Bonnie Mann - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):147-163.
    The lies about the reasons for the U.S. war against Iraq provoked no mass public outcry in the United States against the war. What is the process of justification for this war, a process that seems to need no reasons? Mann argues that the process of justification is not a process of rational deliberation but one of aesthetic self-constitution, of rebuilding a masculine national identity. Included is a feminist reading of the National Defense University document Shock and Awe.
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  45. Militärische Männlichkeit in der deutsch-jüdischen Geschichte.Greg Caplan - 2000 - Die Philosophin 11 (22):85-100.
  46. Gedächtnis und Geschlecht. Zum Umgang mit der Geschichte der Konzentrationslager in beiden deutschen Nachkriegsgesellschaften 28.-31.10.99 - Ravensbrück/Fürstenberg.Julia Köhne - 2000 - Die Philosophin 11 (21):108-115.
  47. The Cold War and the University (Book Review).William J. Peace - 2000 - Science and Society 64 (2):247.
  48. Introduction to De la Résistance.Françoise Proust - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (4):18-22.
    Françoise Proust explains that where Foucault established a cartography of power, she is interested in elaborating an “analytic of resistance.” This, she elaborates, would be “the transcendental of every resistance, whatever kind it be: resistance to power, to the state of things, to history; resistance to destruction, to death, to war; resistance to stupidity, to peace, to bare life.”.
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  49. Addendum to “Rape as a Weapon of War”.Claudia Card - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):216-218.
  50. "Krieg". VII. Symposium der IAPH. 20.-23. September 1995 in Wien.Isabel Wenzler-stöckel - 1996 - Die Philosophin 7 (13):122-126.
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