Feminist Aesthetics

Edited by Peg Brand Weiser (Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis, University of Arizona)
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  1. Projecting Illusion: Film Spectatorship and the Impression of Reality.Richard Allen - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    Projecting Illusion offers a systematic analysis of the impression of reality in the cinema and the pleasure it gives to the film spectator. Film provides a compelling experience that can be considered as a form of illusion akin to the experience of day-dream and dream. Examining the concept of illusion and its relationship to fantasy in the experience of visual representation, Richard Allen situates his explanation within the context of an analytical criticism of contemporary film and critical theory. He argues (...)
  2. Sin Carne: Representaciones y Simulacros Del Cuerpo Femenino: Tecnología, Comunicación y Poder.Mercedes Arriaga Flórez (ed.) - 2006 - Arcibel Editores.
  3. Feminine Perspectives and Narrative Points of View.Ismay Barwell - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (2):63 - 75.
    The search for a unified and coherent feminine aesthetic theory could not be successful because it relies upon "universals" which do not exist and assumes simple parallels among psychological, social and aesthetic structures. However, with an apparatus of narrative points of view, one can demonstrate that individual narrative texts are organized from a feminine point of view. To this extent, the intuition that there is a feminine aesthetic can be vindicated.
  4. Beyond the Canon: Feminists, Postmodernism, and the History of Art.Karen-Edis Barzman - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (3):327-339.
  5. Gender and Genius: Towards a Feminist Aesthetics.Christine Battersby - 1989 - Indiana University Press.
  6. How Many Feminists Does It Take to Make A Joke? Sexist Humor and What's Wrong with It.Merrie Bergmann - 1986 - Hypatia 1 (1):63 - 82.
    In this paper I am concerned with two questions: What is sexist humor? and what is wrong with it? To answer the first question, I briefly develop a theory of humor and then characterize sexist humor as humor in which sexist beliefs (attitudes/norms) are presupposed and are necessary to the fun. Concerning the second question, I criticize a common sort of argument that is supposed to explain why sexist humor is offensive: although the argument explains why sexist humor feels offensive, (...)
  7. Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination.Rosemary Betterton - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
  8. Earth Muse: Feminism, Nature, and Art.Carol Bigwood - 1993 - Temple University Press.
  9. Shedding Light for the Matter.Barbara Bolt - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):202-216.
    : This paper critiques enlightenment notions of representation and rehearses an alternative model of mapping that is grounded in performance. Working from her own practice as a landscape painter, Bolt argues that the particular experience of the "glare" of Australian light fractures the nexus between light, form, knowledge, and subjectivity. This rupture prompts a move from shedding light ON the matter to shedding light FOR the matter and suggests an emergent rather than a representational practice.
  10. Addams's Philosophy of Art : Feminist Aesthetics and Moral Imagination at Hull House.L. Ryan Musgrave Bonomo - 2010 - In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.
  11. Kate Chopin Reconsidered Beyond the Bayou.Lynda S. Boren & Sara Desaussure Davis - 1992
  12. Allegro, Ma Non Troppo : On Feminist Becomings.Rosi Braidotti - 2010 - In Henk Oosterling & Ewa Płonowska Ziarek (eds.), Intermedialities: Philosophy, Arts, Politics. Lexington Books.
  13. The Subject in Feminism.Rosi Braidotti - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (2):155 - 172.
    Inaugural lecture as Professor of Women's Studies in the Arts Faculty of the University of Utrecht, May 16, 1990.
  14. The Role of Luck in Originality and Creativity.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):31-55.
    In this article I explore the concept of originality from several viewpoints. Within the world of printmaking, I show that while print dealers may draw attention to originality in order to enhance economic value, artists emphasize the aesthetic value of a work based on the freedom to express artistic intent and to experiment with techniques of the medium. Within the worlds of philosophy and to some extent, psychology, “originality” has been misleadingly tied to the notions of “creativity” and “genius,” thereby (...)
  15. Glaring Omissions in Traditional Theories of Art.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2003 - In Steven Cahn (ed.), Philosophy for the 21st Century: A Comprehensive Reader. Oxford University Press. pp. 779-813.
    I investigate the role of feminist theorizing in relation to traditionally-based aesthetics. Feminist artworks have arisen within the context of a patriarchal Artworld dominated for thousands of years by male artists, critics, theorists, and philosophers. I look at the history of that context as it impacts philosophical theorizing by pinpointing the narrow range of the paradigms used in defining “art.” I test the plausibility of Danto’s After the End of Art vision of a post-historical, pluralistic future in which “anything goes,” (...)
  16. Introduction: Feminism and Aesthetics.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Mary Devereaux - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):ix-xx.
    This special issue of HYPATIA: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy we co-edited highlights the expanded range of topics at center stage in feminist philosophical inquiry to date (2003): recontextualizing women artists (essays by Patricia Locke, Eleanor Heartney, and Michelle Meagher), bodies and beauty (Ann J. Cahill, Sheila Lintott, Janell Hobson, Richard Shusterman, Joanna Frueh), art, ethics, politics, law (A. W. Eaton, Amy Mullin, L. Ryan Musgrave, Teresa Winterhalter, Joshua Shaw), and review essays by Estella Lauter and Flo Leibowitz.
  17. Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.) - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics takes a fresh look at the history of aesthetics and at current debates within the philosophy of art by exploring the ways in which gender informs notions of art and creativity, evaluation and interpretation, and concepts of aesthetic value. Multiple intellectual traditions have formed this field, and the discussions herein range from consideration of eighteenth century legacies of ideas about taste, beauty, and sublimity to debates about the relevance of postmodern analyses for feminist aesthetics. Forward (...)
  18. Painting the Difference: Sex and Spectator in Modern Art, by Charles Harrison. [REVIEW]Peg Brand - 2007 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):244–246.
    British art historian Charles Harrison presumes the existence of a patriarchal world with power in the hands of men who dominate the representation of women and femininity. He applauds the ground-breaking work of feminist theorists who have questioned this imbalance of power since the 1970s. He stops short, however, of accepting their claims that all women have been represented by male artists as images of “utter passivity” (p. 4), routinely reduced by the male gaze to the status of exploited sexual (...)
  19. Feminism and Aesthetics.Peg Brand - 2007 - In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell.
    This chapter presents an overview of feminism and aesthetics in the 2007 Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy edited by Linda Martin Alcoff and Eva Feder Kittay. Sections cover the topics of distinguishing aesthetics and philosophy of art, bringing feminist theory into aesthetics, developing feminist challenges to aesthetics, the role of women artists in feminist aesthetics, feminist philosophers reflect on self-portraiture and women as objects of beauty, and future developments.
  20. Feminist Art Epistemologies: Understanding Feminist Art.Peg Brand - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):166 - 189.
    Feminist art epistemologies (FAEs) greatly aid the understanding of feminist art, particularly when they serve to illuminate the hidden meanings of an artist's intent. The success of parodic imagery produced by feminist artists (feminist visual parodies, FVPs) necessarily depends upon a viewer's recognition of the original work of art created by a male artist and the realization of the parodist's intent to ridicule and satirize. As Brand shows in this essay, such recognition and realization constitute the knowledge of a well-(in)formed (...)
  21. Salon-Haunters: The Impasse Facing French Intellectuals.Peg Brand - 2005 - In Sally Scholz & Shannon Mussett (eds.), The Contradictions of Freedom: Philosophical Essays on Simone de Beauvoir's the Mandarins. SUNY Press. pp. 211-226.
    Beauvoir maintains a unified "compromise theory" of aesthetics throughout her ethics, feminism, and fiction that portrays the conundrum that every artist faces -- an impasse that sets action against inaction, politics against culture. Beauvoir's theory of art in The Mandarins, aided by an analysis of women's oppression in The Second Sex, advocates art that keeps past events alive in the present and in so doing, changes even the tragic into the life affirming. Beauvoir lauds artists who, even in the face (...)
  22. Review of New Feminist Art Criticism by Katy Deepwell. [REVIEW]Peg Brand - 1997 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (3):344-345.
    Katy Deepwell calls for a vital and visible "new" feminist criticism in 1997 amidst a pessimistic overview of the state of feminist art and criticism in Britain, Canada, and the U.S. As an update to this review, I note that Deepwell took decisive and effective action on her pessimism and for the past twenty years (as of this writing in July 2017) created an online feminist journal--n.paradoxa: international feminist art journal--that has published over 550 articles by 400 writers and artists (...)
  23. The Aesthetics of Childbirth.Peg Brand & Paula Granger - 2012 - In Sheila Lintott & Maureen Sander-Staudt (eds.), Philosophical Inquiries into Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Mothering: Maternal Subjects. Routledge. pp. 215-236.
    Images abound of women throughout the ages engaging in various activities. But why are there so few representations of childbirth in visual art? Feminist artist Judy Chicago once suggested that depictions of women giving birth do not commonly occur in Western culture but can be found in other contexts such as pre-Columbian art or societies previously considered "primitive." Chicago's own exploration of the theme resulted in the creation of The Birth Project (1980-85): an unprecedented series of eighty handcrafted works of (...)
  24. Feminist Art Epistemologies: Understanding Feminist Art.Peggy Zeglin Brand - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):166-189.
    : Feminist art epistemologies (FAEs) greatly aid the understanding of feminist art, particularly when they serve to illuminate the hidden meanings of an artist's intent. The success of parodic imagery produced by feminist artists (feminist visual parodies, FVPs) necessarily depends upon a viewer's recognition of the original work of art created by a male artist and the realization of the parodist's intent to ridicule and satirize. As Brand shows in this essay, such recognition and realization constitute the knowledge of a (...)
  25. The Sense of Art. [REVIEW]Peggy Zeglin Brand - 1990 - The Personalist Forum 6 (1):89-91.
    Review of 1989 text by Ralph A. Smith, noted art education scholar during the era of DBAE (Discipline Based Art Education), that criticizes the author's agenda to remedy the ills of the state of arts education, arts' secondary status to the sciences, pluralism, and popular ideologies of of contemporary culture as an agenda that is (below the surface) clearly conservative, male-centered, Eurocentric and elitist. My conclusion: "Educators, beware.".
  26. Nothing Mat(T)Ers: A Feminist Critique of Postmodernism.Somer Brodribb - 1992 - Spinifex Press.
    "An eloquent work. Somer Brodribb not only gives us a feminist critique of postmodernism with its masculinist predeterminants in existentialism, its Freudian footholdings and its Sadean values, but in the very form and texture of the critique, she literally creates new discourse in feminist theory. Brodribb has transcended not only postmodernism but its requirement that we speak in its voice even when criticizing it. She creates a language that is at once poetic and powerfully analytical. Her insistent and compelling radical (...)
  27. Feminist Perspectives on the Body.Barbara Brook, Gail Weiss, Honi Fern Haber, Jane Arthurs & Jean Grimshaw - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (2):160-169.
  28. Impressionism a Feminist Reading : The Gendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century.Norma Broude - 1997
  29. Art, Oppression, and the Autonomy of Aesthetics.Curtis Brown - 2002 - In Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (eds.), Arguing About Art, Second Edition. Routledge.
    Mary Devereaux has suggested, in an overview of feminist aesthetics[1], that feminist aesthetics constitutes a revolutionary approach to the field: "aesthetics cannot simply 'add on' feminist theories as it might add new works by [ Nelson ] Goodman, Arthur Danto or George Dickie. To take feminism seriously involves rethinking our basic concepts and recasting the history of the discipline." In particular, feminist theory involves a rejection of "deeply entrenched assumptions about the universal value of art and aesthetic experience." Overthrowing these (...)
  30. Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification.Ann J. Cahill - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's equality (...)
  31. Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification.Ann J. Cahill - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    : This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's (...)
  32. Feminist Theaters in the U.S.A. Staging Women's Experience.Charlotte Canning - 1996
  33. Hilde Hein and Carolyn Korsmeyer, Eds., Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective Reviewed By.Joyce A. Carpenter - 1994 - Philosophy in Review 14 (5):329-331.
  34. Excavating Discursivity: "Post-Partum Document" in the Conceptualist, Feminist, and Psychoanalytic Fields.Juli Christine Carson - 2000 - Dissertation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Post-Partum Document, a multi-media artwork made by American artist Mary Kelly from 1973--1978, was informed by and contributed to contemporaneous debates in the fields of Conceptualism, feminism, and psychoanalysis throughout the seventies. This dissertation addresses the project's "debate-specificity." The conventional art historical categorization and analysis of an artwork, one based upon its medium specificity, was a mode of modernist criticism that Kelly's work specifically interrogated. What therefore distinguished Post-Partum Document from other artworks of its period was an interrogation of the (...)
  35. Sexuality Situated: Beauvoir on "Frigidity".Sue L. Cataldi - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):70-82.
    This essay relates scenes from Beauvoir's novels to her views of female eroticism and frigidity in The Second Sex. Expressions of frigidity signal unjust power relations in Beauvoir's literature. She constructs frigidity as a symbolic means of rejecting dominance in heterosexual relations. Thus frigidity need not be interpreted, as it sometimes is, as a form of bad faith. The essay concludes with some thoughts on the relevance of Beauvoir's view of frigidity to contemporary feminism.
  36. Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect.Marguerite la Caze - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
  37. Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning In.Tina Chanter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3).
    : This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus (...)
  38. Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca.Tina Chanter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
  39. Between Poiesis and Praxis: Women and Art.F. Collin - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (1):83-92.
    If we think of artistic creation as a basic dimension of humanity we need to question the absence of female artists in history. We should also look at their gradual emergence in the late 20th century, an emergence that coincides with the feminist movement and a change in the conception of art itself, revealed chiefly by Duchamp. But does art by women have some specificity? Without giving a definite answer as far as subject matter is concerned, we note that the (...)
  40. Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis.Paula M. Cooey - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work of (...)
  41. A Gynecentric Aesthetic.Renée Cox - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (2):43 - 62.
    In the proposed gynecentric aesthetic, which follows the work of Heide Göttner-Abendroth and Alan Lomax, aesthetic activity would function to integrate the individual and society. Intellect, emotion and action would combine to achieve a synthesis of body and spirit. Song and dance would involve the equal expressions of all participants, and aesthetic structures would reflect this egalitarianism. The erotic would be expressed as a vital, positive force, divorced from repression and pornography. The emphasis would be off aesthetic objects to be (...)
  42. Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation.Jean Curthoys - 1997 - Routledge.
    _Feminist Amnesia_ is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticises current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
  43. The Performative Body of Marina Abramović Rerelating (in) Time and Space.Christina Demaria - 2004 - European Journal of Women’s Studies 1 (3):295-307..
    Can a performance be analysed as a textual practice? Starting from this question, the article tries to describe the effets du sens (meaning effects) of some of the work of Marina Abramović, a Serbian performer and visual artist. From the 1970s, when the so-called body art emerged as a visual genre, offering the artist’s body as a naked site of inscription, up to the present, when performing has become a more playful and direct transmission of energy between the doer and (...)
  44. Ideas About Art.Kathleen Kadon Desmond - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements. -- List of Illustrations. -- Preface. -- 1. Public Opinion/Public Art. -- 2. Non-Western Ideas. -- 3. Western Ideas. -- 4. Beauty. -- 5. Expression & Aesthetic Experience. -- 6. Art & Ethics. -- 7. Political Art, Censorship & Pornography. -- 8. Art & Economics. -- 9. Feminist Art, Aesthetics & Art Criticism. -- 10. Postmodern Art & Attitudes. -- 11. Photography & New Media. -- 12. (Re)Discovering Design. -- 13. Art & Aesthetic Education. -- (...)
  45. Autonomist/Formalist Aesthetics, Music Theory, and the Feminist Paradigm of Soft Boundaries.Claire Detels - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (1):113-126.
  46. Feminist Aesthetics.Mary Devereaux - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 647--666.
  47. Interweaving Feminist Frameworks.Elizabeth Ann Dobie - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):381-394.
  48. Feminism and Aesthetics.Josephine Donovan - 1977 - Critical Inquiry 3 (3):605-608.
    In response to the discussion between William W. Morgan and Annette Kolodny in the Summer 1976 issue of Critical Inquiry I would like to address the issue of separating judgments based on feminism as an ideology from purely aesthetic judgments. Peripherally this included the issue of "prescriptive criticism," so labeled by Cheri Register in Feminist Literary Criticism: Explorations in Theory.1 In the same book, as Kolodny points out,2 I called for criticism that exists in the "prophetic mode." Kolodny indicates reservations (...)
  49. Education and Feminist Aesthetics: Gauguin and the Exotic.Jane Duran - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 88-95.
  50. Aesthetics, Epistemics, and Feminist Theory.Jane Duran - 2003 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 37 (1):32-39.
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