Feminist Aesthetics

Edited by Peg Brand Weiser (University of Oregon, University of Arizona, Indiana University Indianapolis)
Assistant editor: Megan Brand (Tulane University)
About this topic
Summary Feminist Aesthetics is the evolving study of the role of gender, race, sexuality, class, age, ability, and nationality in art-making and creativity, the aesthetic experience of art and nature, and the value judgments that result. Our perception, interpretation, and evaluation of artworks and various aesthetic experiences involve interactions infused with cognitive preconceptions and biases, emotions, and knowledge based on past lived experiences. Feminist aesthetics is transdisciplinary in that it involves art practice, art theory, art history, as well as the disciplines of literature, music, theater, dance, film, and other performance arts. Common topics include beauty, the body, agency, and power with feminists challenging traditional concepts, definitions, and canonical writings in aesthetics. Transnational feminisms highlight common international insights into gendered arts while yet acknowledging differences in power, economics, and opportunities. 
Key works Linda Nochlin's essay [Nochlin 1971], "Why Are There No Great Women Artists?" is often cited as an initial challenge to the mainstream notion of male artist, creativity, and genius. Gisela Ecker [Ecker 1986] published one of the earliest collections of essays questioning the difference between "feminine" and "feminist" in philosophical aesthetics. Scholarship had already been established in literary theory, art theory, and film theory. Analytic philosophers Hilde Hein and Carolyn Korsmeyer introduced a collection of essays, Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective [Hein & Korsmeyer 1993], based on a 1990 special issue of HYPATIA: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy [Hein & Korsmeyer 1990]. Peg Zeglin Brand [Weiser] and Carolyn Korsmeyer published the anthology, Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics [Brand Weiser & Korsmeyer 1995] based on the first feminist special issue of The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism [Brand & Korsmeyer 1990]. A special issue of Hypatia entitled "Women, Art, and Aesthetics" [Brand Weiser & Devereaux 2003] was co-edited by Brand Weiser and Devereaux. Issues in black feminist aesthetics were introduced in 1992 in Black Looks: Race and Representation [Hooks 2014] and updated in the 2019 Special Issue on Race and Aesthetics of The Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism [Peterson & Eaton 2019]. Intersectionality is analyzed in "Oppression, Privilege, and Aesthetics: The Use of the Aesthetic in Theories of Race, Gender and Sexuality, and the Role of Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Philosophical Aesthetics" [James 2013]. Disability was the forte of Anita Silvers [Silvers 2000]. For transnational perspectives, see Feminist Theory and the Aesthetics Within: A Perspective from South Asia [Aneja 2022], Bodies in China: Philosophy, Aesthetics, Gender, and Politics [Man 2017], Decolonial Aesthetics: Tangled Humanism in the Afro-European Context I [Ott & Diop 2023] and Decolonial Aesthetics II: Modes of Relating [Oloko et al 2023].
Introductions The most basic introductory text is Gender and Aesthetics: An Introduction by Carolyn Korsmeyer [Korsmeyer 2004]. Many overviews offer introductions to the field: Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy [Korsmeyer & Weiser 2021], Cross-Cultural Reflections on Chinese Aesthetics, Gender, Embodiment and Learning [Man 2020], "Feminist Aesthetics" [Arguello 2019], "Historicizing Feminist Aesthetics" [Chanter 2017], "Feminist Philosophy of Art" [Eaton 2008], and "Feminist Aesthetics" [Devereaux 2003].
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  1. M. Gołaszewska Estetyka możliwości. Eseje filozoficzne.Anna M. Lankosz - forthcoming - Estetyka I Krytyka 12 (12):266-268.
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  2. The Feminist Art Project (TFAP) and its Significance for Aesthetics.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - forthcoming - In Weiser Peg Zeglin Brand (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art: Critical Visions, Creative Engagements. Springer Press.
    In 1970, art critic Linda Nochlin articulated the radical question, "Why are there no great women artists?" The Feminist Art Project is engaged in a national and international re-assessment of that question, complete with a long overdue commemoration and celebration of women artists. Given TFAP's stated emphasis on recognizing the aesthetic impact of women on the visual arts and culture, questions arise within our own philosophical community about the potential impact of TFAP, the significance of women artists, and the role (...)
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  3. Beyond the Sovereign Self: Aesthetic Autonomy from the Avant-Garde to Socially Engaged Art.Grant H. Kester - 2024 - Duke University Press.
    In _Beyond the Sovereign Self_ Grant H. Kester continues the critique of aesthetic autonomy begun in _The Sovereign Self_, showing how socially engaged art provides an alternative aesthetic with greater possibilities for critical practice. Instead of grounding art in its distance from the social, Kester shows how socially engaged art, developed in conjunction with forms of social or political resistance, encourages the creative capacity required for collective political transformation. Among others, Kester analyzes the work of conceptual artist Adrian Piper, experimental (...)
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  4. Beauty, Anger, and Artistic Activism.Matilde Carrasco Barranco - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 81 (2):280-289.
    The rejection of beauty from a political standpoint is a significant part of the legacy of avant-gardism in contemporary art. In particular, Arthur Danto signaled that artistic activism should avoid beauty simply because beauty induces the wrong perspective on whatever it is desired to have an impact upon. While artistic beauty’s tendency would be to heal, he claimed, political protest needs anger as its trigger. This article challenges such an argument that opposes beauty’s emotional effects on political action by examining (...)
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  5. Uncommon Sense: Jeremy Bentham, Queer Aesthetics, and the Politics of Taste. [REVIEW]Wesley D. Cray - 2023 - British Journal of Aesthetics 63 (4):608-611.
    It would be an almost comical understatement to say that, throughout my graduate study in philosophy and subsequent years of teaching and writing, I found myself engaging with the works of Jeremy Bentham somewhat infrequently. Beyond flavorful anecdotes about mummified heads and jabs about stilted nonsense in my undergraduate Intro to Ethics courses—as we segued into extended discussion of John Stuart Mill, of course—Bentham’s direct and recognized role in my philosophical activities has been pretty much nonexistent. With all that said: (...)
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  6. Editor's Introduction.Laura T. Di Summa - 2023 - Film and Philosophy 27:3-4.
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  7. Being in a Horror Movie.Pete Falconer - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 81 (3):293-305.
    This article takes as its starting point a recurring complaint in the popular reception of horror movies: that the characters in them behave foolishly. I argue that such complaints fail to recognize that the horror genre exploits a fundamental tension in fiction, between the perspective on a fictional world offered to its audience and that available to its characters. This distinction is highlighted in horror, which often depicts characters with everyday expectations facing extraordinary threats. Horror characters are frequently taken by (...)
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  8. Marking Radical Aesthetics in the Time of Racial Capitalism.Marina Gržinić - 2023 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 81 (2):201-212.
    This article examines colonialism, the regime of whiteness, and feminism; it sketches possible genealogies of theories and practices in order to design an aesthetic of radicality or a radical aesthetic that is insurgent and defiant, based on histories and knowledge. We know that aesthetics is a colonial formation that historically and currently privileges the white European bourgeois who could speculate on the beautiful and the good, while genocidal practices and slave trade were carried out from European soil in other parts (...)
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  9. Indigenous and Local Knowledge and Aesthetics: Towards an Intergenerational Aesthetics of Nature.Nanda Jarosz - 2023 - Environmental Values 32 (2):151-168.
    In a recent paper, Allen Carlson moves away from a purely scientific–cognitive framework for environmental aesthetics towards a ‘combination position’ based on the ecoaesthetics theorised by Xiangzhan Cheng. Carlson argues that only an aesthetics informed by ecological knowledge can offer the correct foundations for the continued relevance of environmental aesthetics to environmental ethics. However, closer analysis of Cheng's theory of ecoaesthetics reveals a number of problems related to questions of anthropocentrism and in particular, the issue of an ethic based on (...)
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  10. Forgetful and Drowsy: The Affective Atmospheres in Contemporary Latvian Photography.Jana Kukaine & Janis Taurens - 2023 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 68:57-74.
    In the article, we advance the notion of an affective atmosphere for analyzing the works of art by two contemporary Latvian photographers—Aija Bley (b. 1967) and Arnis Balčus (b. 1978). The spatial relations of bodies and environments and the photographed sub- jects’ facial expressions and postures negotiate a sense of postsocialist affectivity that we describe as forgetful and drowsy. In the selected images, the affective atmospheres enact the ambiguities of the Soviet legacies, along with the challenges of neoliberal rationality affecting (...)
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  11. Epistemic Injustice and the Body in Photography.Marta Maliszewska - 2023 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 68:89-99.
    This paper analyzes the role of the viewers of photographs of violence. The main argument is that due to the characteristic of the medium, both the photographer and the photographed subjects shape the image. The customary overlooking of the photographed subjects’ agency is conceptualized as epistemic injustice first committed by the photographer and then by the viewer. A method of interpreting war photographs influenced by critical fabulation and listening to images is proposed to overcome it. Even though every case of (...)
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  12. Feeling Historical: Postsocialist Affect in Estonian Fiction.Raili Marling - 2023 - Polish Journal of Aesthetics 68:75-87.
    In this article, building on the work of Lauren Berlant (2008, 2022) and Sara Ahmed (2004, 2010), I ask what it means to feel historical in the context of today’s pervasive crisis [of] ordinariness, whether it is possible to talk about a particular postsocialist affect, and what aesthetic forms the affect takes in fiction. The analysis of two Estonian texts will follow the theoretical discussion: Tõnu Õnnepalu’s novel Border State (1993) and Maarja Kangro’s story collection Õismäe ajamasin (2021). -/- Lauren (...)
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  13. From the Feminist Ethic of Care to Tender Attunement: Olga Tokarczuk’s Tenderness as a New Ethical and Aesthetic Imperative.Natalia Anna Michna - 2023 - Arts 12 (3):1-15.
    In her Nobel speech in 2019, Olga Tokarczuk presented the category of tenderness as a new way of narrating the contemporary world. This article is a proposal for the analysis and interpretation of tenderness in ethical and aesthetic terms. (1) From an ethical perspective, tenderness is interpreted as an extension and complement of feminist relational ethics, i.e., the ethics of care. In the proposed approach, tenderness is a broader and more universal quality than care in the feminist understanding. This article (...)
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  14. Decolonial Aesthetics II: Modes of Relating.Patrick Oloko, Michaela Ott, Peter Simatei & Clarissa Vierke (eds.) - 2023 - Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
    This book features writing by 17 authors from Germany and from African and Latin American countries on highly diverse aesthetic phenomena as seen from their own different points of view. The texts in this volume all deal with the imperative of ‘decolonization’: they try to highlight aesthetic strategies for the (re)discovery of unthematized, misappropriated, transcultural and even transcontinental histories and memories and aesthetic practices that are absent from or too little perceived within national consciousnesses. Novels, poems and musical performances from (...)
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  15. Decolonial Aesthetics I: Tangled Humanism in the Afro-European Context.Michaela Ott & Babacar Mbaye Diop (eds.) - 2023 - Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
    The publication aims to make suggestions for a 'decolonisation of aesthetics' within an Afro-European framework. The texts (whose authors come from different cultural contexts between Germany, France, Senegal, Benin, Nigeria and Tunesia) do not only refer to heterogenous aesthetic practices understood as subversive and decolonial strategies, but also discuss philosophical questions of a renewed (non-in)dividual humanism. The artistic practices analyzed include artistic installations and ensembles as well as actions in urban and rural space, deceptive manœuvres at the borders and their (...)
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  16. Artists Remake the World: A Contemporary Art Manifesto.Vid Simoniti - 2023 - Yale University Press.
    _An exploration of the relationship between contemporary art, politics, and activism, Artists Remake the World introduces readers to the political ambitions of contemporary art in the early twenty-first century and puts forward a new, wide-ranging account of art’s political potential. Surveying such innovations as evidence-driven art, socially engaged art, and ecological art, the book explores how artists have attempted to offer bold solutions to the world’s problems. Vid Simoniti offers original perspectives on contemporary art and its capacity as a force (...)
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  17. Feminist Theory and the Aesthetics Within.Anu Aneja - 2022 - New York: Routledge.
    This book re-examines feminist theory through the lens of South Asian aesthetic conventions drawn from iconography, philosophy, Indo-Islamic mystic folk traditions and poetics. It discusses alternate fluid representations of gender and intersectional identities and interrelationships in some dominant as well as non-elite Indic aesthetic traditions. The book explores pre-Vedic sculptural and Indus terracotta iconographies, the classical aesthetic philosophy of rasa, mystic folk poetry of Bhakti and Sufi movements, and ghazal and Urdu poetics to understand the political dimension of feminist theory (...)
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  18. Art and Ethico-Political Value.Adriana Clavel-Vázquez - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (4):597-614.
    Work in feminist and critical race aesthetics brings out a complex interaction between aesthetic, ethical, and political value. The interest in ethico-political considerations is also found in recent literature around art and ethics, such as debates about the work of immoral artists, cultural appropriation and heritage, and art in public spaces. These discussions are characterized by a social structural approach to the ethico-political value of art that focuses on relations between artworks, other artefacts, and individuals in specific sociohistorical contexts and (...)
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  19. A Philosophy of Fashion Through Film: On the Body, Style, and Identity.Laura T. Di Summa - 2022 - Bloomsbury Publishing.
    The question of whether movies can deliver philosophical content is a leading topic in the cognitive and analytic debate on film. But instead of turning to the well-trodden terrain of narrative and emotional engagement, this is the first time fashion and costume choices are analyzed to demonstrate how movies can be said to be doing philosophy. -/- Considering how fashion and costumes can deliver the epistemic content of a film and act as a guidance to the interpretation of the philosophical (...)
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  20. Imperfection as a Vehicle for Fat Visibility in Popular Media.Cheryl Frazier - 2022 - In Peter Cheyne (ed.), Imperfectionist Aesthetics in Art and Everyday Life. London: Routledge.
    Fat people are often depicted in popular media as imperfect, their whole characters riddled with negative features that can be attributed only to their non-idealized body. These representations imply not only that fatness itself is aesthetically and physically imperfect, but that fatness is caused by and causes more robust character imperfections. Using Hulu series Shrill as a model, I argue that in order to address our collective distaste for fat bodies (and, by extension, our shared anti-fat bias) we must create (...)
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  21. Women as Open Wounds: Fear, Desire, Disgust and the Ideal Feminine in the Works of Alexander McQueen and John Galliano.Danae Ioannou - 2022 - Popular Inquiry 11 (2):32-47.
    Starting from the notion of the Ideal Feminine, this paper discusses the representation of trauma and the portrayal of women as open wounds in the designs of Alexander McQueen and John Galliano. Particularly, I explore how the McQueen’s Deadly Woman and Galliano’s Doll question the boundaries between mortality, sexuality and decay. By examining the relationship between fear, desire and disgust in the aesthetic representation of the wounded fashioned body, I argue that in their works disgust functions as an empowering emotion, (...)
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  22. Bodies, Functions, and Imperfections.Sherri Irvin - 2022 - In Peter Cheyne (ed.), Imperfectionist Aesthetics in Art and Everyday Life. London: Routledge. pp. 271-283.
    The culturally pervasive tendency to identify aspects of the body as aesthetically imperfect harms individuals and scaffolds injustice related to disability, race, gender, LGBTQ+ identities, and fatness. But abandoning the notion of imperfection may not respect people’s reasonable understandings of their own bodies. I examine the prospects for a practice of aesthetic assessment grounded in a notion of the body’s function. I argue that functional aesthetic assessment, to be respectful, requires understanding the body’s functions as complex, malleable, and determined by (...)
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  23. Indigenous Feminism and This Bridge Called My Back: Storytelling with Chrystos, Max Wolf Valerio, and Jo Carrillo.Kelsey Leonard, Chrystos, Max Wolf Valerio & Jo Carrillo - 2022 - Feminist Studies 48 (1):81-107.
    Abstract:There is a storied history of Native and Indigenous feminisms on Turtle Island (North America). We are fortunate that many of those stories birthed from an ancestral tradition of storytelling and survivance were captured in the canonical feminist anthology This Bridge Called My Back: Writings of Radical Women of Color. In celebration and commemoration of 40 years since This Bridge was first published we visit with three of the books original Native and Indigenous contributors–Chrystos, Max Wolf Valerio, and Jo Carrillo–to (...)
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  24. Paradox of Rape in Horror Movies.Lucia Schwarz - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (4):671-686.
    In this paper, I identify and provide an explanation for a heretofore unrecognized puzzle in feminist aesthetics and the philosophy of horror. Many horror movie fans have an aversion to rape scenes. This is puzzling because genre fans are not equally bothered by the depiction of other types of violence and cruelty. I argue that we can make sense of this selective aversion by appeal to the notion of ‘distance’, which philosophers of horror use to explain why people are attracted (...)
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  25. Fashioning Sufi: body politics of androgynous sacred aesthetics.Sara Shroff - 2022 - Feminist Theory 23 (3):407-419.
    Revered as the ‘Queen of Qawwali’ and ‘Queen of Sufi music’, sixty-seven-year-old Abida Parveen is a spiritual phenomenon who transcends gender while performing. She is known for her signature fashion style of buttoned-up masculine-cut kurta with matching shalwar and an ajrak shawl. Her aesthetic circulates within transnational and national fashion media and popular cultural spaces through descriptors such as androgynous, masculine, modest, indigenous and sacred. As a highly respected figure with widely circulating performances on both the national and international stages, (...)
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  26. Open Casket and the Art World: A Cautionary Tale.Katherine Tullmann - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (1):27-42.
    In 2017, the artist Dana Schutz presented her painting, Open Casket, at the Whitney Biennial. Both the painting and the painter were subsequently subjected to criticism from the art world. A central critique was that Schutz usurped the story of Emmett Till (the subject of Open Casket) and that, as a white woman, she had no right to do so. Much can—and has—been said on the appropriateness of Schutz's painting. In this article, I argue that Open Casket is a site (...)
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  27. Privacy, Feminism, and Moral Responsibility in the Work of Elizabeth Lane Beardsley.Julie Van Camp - 2022 - Journal of the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists 1 (1):99-114.
    I wonder why women philosophers, once recognized, too often seem to drop from the intellectual radar screen or, at least, to drop mainly to the land of footnotes and bibliographies. I consider one distinguished moral philosopher, Elizabeth Lane Beardsley, both to highlight her philosophical contributions and as a case study that suggests more widespread problems in recognizing t5he work of female philosophers and ensuring their rightful place in our professional dialogue. I consider sociological and professional factors which might partially explain (...)
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  28. The Philosophy of Curatorial Practice: Between Work and World. [REVIEW]Rossen Ventzislavov - 2022 - British Journal of Aesthetics 62 (3):274.
    Curating is a confounding concept—highly specialized in its technical meaning but wildly ecumenical in colloquial usage. This makes it a good candidate for philosophical attention. Considering how often the boundaries of curating have been redrawn since the 1960s, it is encouraging to see philosophers finally turning their lens on it in the last decade. This is also partly what makes Sue Spaid’s The philosophy of curatorial practice: between work and world a welcome contribution. The book might fall short of a (...)
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  29. Pittura: A Gendered Template for Painting.Peg Weiser - 2022 - In Noël Carroll & Jonathan Gilmore (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophies of Painting and Sculpture. Routledge. pp. 322-336. Translated by Noel Carroll & Jonathan Gilmore.
    Why is painting unique among the visual arts? And why in the late sixteenth century did Cesare Ripa in his landmark Iconologia choose to create a distinctly female template for the act of painting? Moreover, why would a woman--Artemisia Gentileschi, among others--ever choose to paint herself as La Pittura (The Allegory of Painting)? This essay offers the thoughts of a painter-philosopher on the historic significance of the choice of topic, iconography, and gender of the most recognized allegory of Painting, namely (...)
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  30. Pittura: A Gendered Template for Painting.Peg Brand Weiser - 2022 - In Noël Carroll & Jonathan Gilmore (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophies of Painting and Sculpture. Routledge. pp. 322-336.
    Why is painting unique among the visual arts? And why in the late sixteenth century did Cesare Ripa in his landmark Iconologia choose to create a distinctly female template for the act of painting? Moreover, why would a woman ever choose to paint herself as La Pittura (The Allegory of Painting)? This essay offers the thoughts of a painter-philosopher on the historic significance of the choice of topic, iconography, and gender of the most recognized allegory of Painting, namely the original (...)
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  31. Pittura: A Gendered Template for Painting.Peg Brand Weiser - 2022 - In Noël Carroll & Jonathan Gilmore (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophies of Painting and Sculpture. Routledge. pp. 322-336.
    Why is painting unique among the visual arts? And why in the late sixteenth century did Cesare Ripa in his landmark Iconologia choose to create a distinctly female template for the act of painting? Moreover, why would a woman ever choose to paint herself as La Pittura (The Allegory of Painting)? This essay offers the thoughts of a painter-philosopher on the historic significance of the choice of topic, iconography, and gender of the most recognized allegory of Painting, namely the original (...)
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  32. Changing Perceptions of Beautiful Bodies: The Athletic Agency Model.Peg Brand Weiser - 2022 - In Andrew Edgar & William Morgan (eds.), Somaesthetics and Sport. Brill. pp. 85-113.
    I consider what draws us to perceiving beautiful bodies in art and athletics--repeatedly and over time--that is informed by viewers' changing perceptions derived from recent publications in fashion and sport, the philosophy of sport, feminist film theory and aesthetics under the ever-expanding umbrella of somaesthetics. This paper won the American Society for Aesthetics 2023 Somaesthetics Prize.
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  33. The Exclusion of Early Modern Women Philosophers from the Canon: Causes and Counteractive Strategies from the Digital Humanities.Natalia Zorrilla - 2022 - Hypatia 37 (1):177-186.
    Whether it be in universities’ curricula or in traditional accounts of the history of philosophy, early modern women philosophers have frequently been treated as secondary, inconsequential characters. Although many valuable efforts are being made to counter this state of affairs, a generalized tendency to focus on well-known male philosophers and to establish them as representative figures of the early modern period still seems to exist. But does this strategy produce an accurate historical account of early modern philosophy? This essay explores (...)
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  34. "Hands Tied: a roundtable on Maria Lassnig and Ayesha Hameed" (5th edition).Rachel Aumiller, Sam Dolbear, Nadine El-Enany, Amelia Groom, Clio Nicastro, Anja Sunhyun Michaelsen & M. Ty - 2021 - Another Gaze: A Journal for Film and Feminism 5:34-42.
    'Hands Tied' brings together two very different films about hands: Maria Lassnig's Palmistry (1973) and Ayesha Hameed's A Rough History (of the Destruction of Fingerprints) (2016). These works are contextualised and their scope extended further by a roundtable discussion featuring participants Rachel Aumiller, Sam Dolbear, Nadine El-Enany, Amelia Groom, Clio Nicastro, Anja Sunhyun Michaelsen, and M. Ty., who discuss their relation to fate, work, pleasure, touch, and surveillance.
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  35. Making a Choice When There Is No "Better Man".Laura M. Bernhardt - 2021 - In Stefano Marino & Andrea Schembari (eds.), Pearl Jam and philosophy. New York: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 79-94.
    The woman at the heart of Pearl Jam’s “Better Man” (Vitalogy, 1994) is trapped. She has committed herself to a relationship that makes her miserable, but she sees no viable alternative to staying in it. She mourns a past self who might have been able to leave and dreams of a dierent way things might be, but remains unable to move on. It is tempting to view her with a mixture of pity and frustration (reecting some of the personal circumstances (...)
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  36. Masculine Power? A Gendered Look at the Frontispiece of Hobbes's Leviathan.Joanne Boucher - 2021 - Hypatia 36 (4):636-656.
    The frontispiece of Hobbes's Leviathan is justly renowned as a powerful visual advertisement for his political philosophy. Consequently, its rich imagery has been the subject of extensive scholarly commentary. Surprisingly, then, its gendered dimensions have received relatively limited attention. This essay explores this neglected facet of the frontispiece. I argue that the image initially appears to present a hypermasculine sovereign. However, upon closer inspection, and considered alongside Hobbes's economic theory, it yields to a reading of the sovereign as an ambiguously (...)
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  37. Feminist Criticism: On Disturbatory Art and Beauty.Peg Brand Weiser - 2021 - In Lydia Goehr & Jonathan Gilmore (eds.), A Companion to Arthur C. Danto. Hoboken: Wiley. pp. 344-353.
    Arthur C. Danto, philosopher and art critic for The Nation from 1984-2009, offered interpretations of artworks by a wide array of artists, including Eva Hesse, Judy Chicago, and Cindy Sherman, whose "disturbatory" works were either ignored or denounced by mainstream critics at the time. Danto's championing of feminist art was deliberate and delightful; he openly endorsed the Guerilla Girls! His feminist art critical writings ultimately shaped the early development of what has come to be known as "feminist aesthetics" particularly his (...)
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  38. Some Considerations Regarding Adornment, the Gender “Binary,” and Gender Expression.Wesley D. Cray - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (4):488-492.
    Stephen Davies’s Adornment lays an admirable foundation upon which much fruitful philosophical discussion about the topic of adornment can—and likely, will—be b.
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  39. Disgust, Embodied Affect, and the Portrayal of Native Americans in Classic Hollywood Westerns.Dan Flory - 2021 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 79 (4):465-478.
    During the early part of the classic Hollywood sound period (1930–60), filmmakers sharpened a standardized way to portray Native American characters in Westerns. Such figures were depicted as disgusting by virtue of being beyond the pale in terms of their “acceptable” moral behavior, as measured by common white sensibilities of the era. This behavior was attributed to their nonwhiteness and therefore presumptively stemmed from their allegedly subhuman, “savage” nature. This stock depiction of Native American characters became one of creatures who (...)
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  40. Forgetting Fatness: The Violent Co-optation of the Body Positivity Movement.Cheryl Frazier & Nadia Mehdi - 2021 - Debates in Aesthetics 16 (1):13-28.
    In this paper we track the ‘body positivity’ movement from its origins, promoting radical acceptance of marginalized bodies, to its co-optation as a push for self-love for all bodies, including those bodies belonging to socially dominant groups. We argue that the new focus on the ‘body positivity’ movement involves a single-minded emphasis on beauty and aesthetic adornment, and that this undermines the original focus of social and political equality, pandering instead to capitalism and failing to rectify unjust institutions and policies. (...)
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  41. On Justice as Dance.Joshua Hall - 2021 - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture 5 (4):62-78.
    This article is part of a larger project that explores how to channel people’s passion for popular arts into legal social justice by reconceiving law as a kind of poetry and justice as dance, and exploring different possible relationships between said legal poetry and dancing justice. I begin by rehearsing my previous new conception of social justice as organismic empowerment, and my interpretive method of dancing-with. I then apply this method to the following four “ethico-political choreographies of justice”: the choral (...)
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  42. Feminist Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer & Peg Weiser - 2021 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Overview essay of the field of feminist aesthetics updated Winter, 2021.
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  43. Art as Political Discourse.Vid Simoniti - 2021 - British Journal of Aesthetics 61 (4):559-574.
    Much art is committed to political causes. However, does art contribute something unique to political discourse, or does it merely reflect the insights of political science and political philosophy? Here I argue for indispensability of art to political discourse by building on the debate about artistic cognitivism, the view that art is a source of knowledge. Different artforms, I suggest, make available specific epistemic resources, which allow audiences to overcome epistemic obstacles that obtain in a given ideological situation. My goal (...)
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  44. Ugly Differences: Queer Female Sexuality in the Underground Yetta Howard. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 2018.Wibke Straube - 2021 - Hypatia 36 (4).
    Yetta Howard's queer-radical monograph Ugly Differences: Queer Female Sexuality in the Underground presents in its four chapters and conclusion a critical discussion of queer radicality in underground art productions. The chapters engage with Slava Tsukerman's camp cult movie Liquid Sky, Sapphire's poetry, Roberta Gregory's and Erika Lopez's comics, A. L. Steiner and Narcissister's collaborative art installation Winter/Spring Collection, and New Queer Cinema's High Art. In this volume, Howard unearths a spectrum of aesthetic pleasure derived from survival and self-destruction, to tragic (...)
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  45. Oxford Handbook of Feminist Philosophy.Ásta Sveinsdóttir & Kim Q. Hall (eds.) - 2021
    This exciting new Handbook offers a comprehensive overview of the contemporary state of the field in feminist philosophy. The editors' introduction and forty-five essays cover feminist critical engagements with philosophy and adjacent scholarly fields, as well as feminist approaches to current debates and crises across the world. Authors cover topics ranging from the ways in which feminist philosophy attends to other systems of oppression, and the gendered, racialized, and classed assumptions embedded in philosophical concepts, to feminist perspectives on prominent subfields (...)
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  46. Conjuring Hands: The Art of Curious Women of Color.G. Wilson, J. Acuff & V. López - 2021 - Hypatia 36 (3):566-580.
    The verb “to conjure” is a complex one, for it includes in its standard definition a great range of possible actions or operations, not all of them equivalent, or even compatible. In its most common usage, “to conjure” means to perform an act of magic or to invoke a supernatural force, by casting a spell, say, or performing a particular ritual or rite. But “to conjure” is also to influence, to beg, to command or constrain, to charm, to bewitch, to (...)
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  47. Dance as Embodied Ethics.Aili Bresnahan, Einav Katan-Schmid & Sara Houston - 2020 - In Laura Cull Ó Maoilearca, Alice Lagaay, Ira Avneri, Freddie Rokem, Jerri Daboo, Michael Ellison, Hannah McClure, Andres Fabien Henao Castro, David Kornhaber, Anthony Gritten, Laura Cull ó Maoilearca, Sreenath Nair, Will Daddario, Esther Neff, Yelena Gluzman, Fumi Okiji & Theron Schmidt (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Performance Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 379-386.
    This chapter, composed of three parts by three different authors, proposes that one of the many possible ways that dance might embody philosophic thought and discourse is via embodying ethical practice. Each author contributes a different perspective on the relationship between dance and ethical activity. The perspectives can be read both as separate ideas and as interrelated thoughts. Einav Katan-Schmid views ‘dance’ as a metaphor for ‘embodied ethics’. She analyses dance as an embodied activity of decision-making which regulates the tension (...)
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  48. The Aestheticisation of Feminism: A Case Study of Feminist Instagram Aesthetics.Rosa Crepax - 2020 - Zonemoda Journal 10 (1S):71-81.
    The sphere of aesthetics has come to play an increasingly crucial role in today’s world, shaping every aspect of our contemporary culture and everyday life, from our practices of consumption, to the way we use the internet and our whole lifestyles. In this regard, it is especially interesting to examine to what extent and to what effect this phenomenon has also spread to socio-political areas which have traditionally little to do with art and beauty. With this article, I will explore (...)
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  49. Art Criticism and the State of Feminist Art Criticism.Katy Deepwell - 2020 - Arts 9 (1):1-50.
    This essay is in four parts. The first offers a critique of James Elkins and Michael Newman’s book The State of Art Criticism (Routledge, 2008) for what it tells us about art criticism in academia and journalism and feminism; the second considers how a gendered analysis measures the “state” of art and art criticism as a feminist intervention; and the third, how neo-liberal mis-readings of Linda Nochlin and Laura Mulvey in the art world represent feminism in ideas about “greatness” and (...)
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  50. Afro-Latin Dance as Reconstructive Gestural Discourse: The Figuration Philosophy of Dance on Salsa.Joshua M. Hall - 2020 - Research in Dance Education 22:1-15.
    The Afro-Latin dance known as ‘salsa’ is a fusion of multiple dances from West Africa, Muslim Spain, enslaved communities in the Caribbean, and the United States. In part due to its global origins, salsa was pivotal in the development of the Figuration philosophy of dance, and for ‘dancing with,’ the theoretical method for social justice derived therefrom. In the present article, I apply the completed theory Figuration exclusively to salsa for the first time, after situating the latter in the dance (...)
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