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Summary Arising at the intersection of the sub-disciplines of bioethics and feminist philosophy, feminist bioethics was largely dominated by questions of reproduction in its early years. More recently, the concerns of this field have diversified, to include topics such as ageing, end-of-life decision-making, consent and substituted decision-making, mental health ethics and care relations, to name but a few. Feminist approaches to bioethical issues have tended to emphasise the theoretical and ethical importance of embodiment, care, vulnerability and dependence rather than ideas of rationality and autonomy. That said, feminists involved in this area have also generated important new ways of thinking about moral agency, such as in relational autonomy, for instance. 
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  1. Response: The Commodification of Women's Bodies in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Donation.Liliana Acero - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):25 - 32.
  2. Book Review: Janet L. Dolgin. Families: Law, Gender and Difference and Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age. By New York: New York University Press, 1997. And David M. Estlund and Martha C. Nussbaum. Sex, Preference, and Family: Essays in Law and Nature. New York: Oxford University Press, 1997. [REVIEW]David M. Adams - 2002 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 17 (3):254-256.
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  3. Predictors of Maternal Health As Perceived By Pregnant Women In Eti-Osa, Lagos State, Nigeria.Sussan O. Adeusi, Olujide A. Adekeye & Lisa O. Ebere - unknown
    This study was an attempt to examine predictors of maternal health as perceived by pregnant women in Eti-Osa LGA of Lagos State. The study adopted the survey design. The Maternal Health Scale , a self designed scale consisting of 25 items was administered to 100 pregnant women in three selected hospitals. Three hypotheses were formulated for the study and they were all sustained. Cultural practices was the most potent predictor of maternal health . Consequent upon these findings, there is need (...)
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  4. Same but Different: Constructions of Female Violence in Forensic Mental Health.Gwen Adshead - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):41-68.
    We are more alike than we are different.In male prisons, the agency and antisocial mindset of violent offenders is taken seriously in the pursuit of rehabilitation. Male offenders are expected to own full agency for their cruelty and violence to others, and to explore it in supported rehabilitative group-work programs. Such programs have been shown to be highly effective for some offenders and relate to a process of engaging with a new pro-social identity and taking responsibility for leading a "good (...)
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  5. Discapacidad y reconocimiento: reflexiones desde el prisma de Axel Honneth.Paulina Morales Aguilera & Beatriz Vallés González - 2013 - Dilemata 13:189-208.
    The sphere of disability can be treated nowadays from different perspectives that answer to multidimensional of this embodied reality. In this context, a privileged area of reflection is constituted by ethics and, inside of this, as this text propose, the prism of the reciprocal recognition. To achieve this, this present article is structured in two parts. The first, regarding to the understanding of disability from different models. The second, according to the recognition perspective approach of Honneth, and its link with (...)
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  6. Nicole Vitellone Sex at the Margins: Migration, Labour Markets and the Rescue Industry.L. M. Agustin - 2008 - Body and Society 14 (2):123.
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  7. Gender and Reproduction.Linda Alcoff - 2008 - Asian Journal of Women's Studies 14 (4):7-27.
  8. “The Angel of the House” in the Realm of ART: Feminist Approach to Oocyte and Spare Embryo Donation for Research. [REVIEW]Anna Alichniewicz & Monika Michalowska - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):123-129.
    The spectacular progress in assisted reproduction technology that has been witnessed for the past thirty years resulted in emerging new ethical dilemmas as well as the revision of some perennial ones. The paper aims at a feminist approach to oocyte and spare embryo donation for research. First, referring to different concepts of autonomy and informed consent, we discuss whether the decision to donate oocyte/embryo can truly be an autonomous choice of a female patient. Secondly, we argue the commonly adopted language (...)
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  9. 'Nagging' Questions: Feminist Ethics in Everyday Life.Anita L. Allen, Sandra Lee Bartky, John Christman, Judith Wagner DeCew, Edward Johnson, Lenore Kuo, Mary Briody Mahowald, Kathryn Pauly Morgan, Melinda Roberts, Debra Satz, Susan Sherwin, Anita Superson, Mary Anne Warren & Susan Wendell - 1995 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this anthology of new and classic articles, fifteen noted feminist philosophers explore contemporary ethical issues that uniquely affect the lives of women. These issues in applied ethics include autonomy, responsibility, sexual harassment, women in the military, new technologies for reproduction, surrogate motherhood, pornography, abortion, nonfeminist women and others. Whether generated by old social standards or intensified by recent technology, these dilemmas all pose persistent, 'nagging,' questions that cry out for answers.
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  10. Book Review: Joan Callahan. Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Bloomington, In: Indiana University Press, 1995 and Laura Purdy. Reproducing Persons: Issues in Feminist Bioethics. And Kathy Rudy. Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice. [REVIEW]Anita LaFrance Allen - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (4):202-211.
  11. Book Review: Joan Callahan. Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law. Bloomington, In: Indiana University Press, 1995 and Laura Purdy. Reproducing Persons: Issues in Feminist Bioethics. And Kathy Rudy. Beyond Pro-Life and Pro-Choice. [REVIEW]Anita LaFrance Allen - 1997 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 12 (4):202-211.
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  12. Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  13. "This Child, Whose Bone Age Is Fourteen . . .": Ethical Dimensions of Skeletal Age Assessment.Rustem Ertug Altinay - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):165 - 173.
    Forensic age estimation in living subjects is an important task for forensic experts, especially in countries where birth records are not well maintained. The process often is used to confirm the chronological age of a criminal or victim when there is a lack of available evidence, such as birth records and witnesses. Focusing on the case of Turkey where the Greulich and Pyle method is often the only method used in forensic estimation of age, this paper seeks to discuss the (...)
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  14. Feminist Bioethics.Judith Andre - 2011 - Biomedical Law and Ethics 4 (2).
    Overview of feminist bioethics for the journal of the Ewha Women's College, Seoul, South Korea.
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  15. Remember the Nurses.Judith Andre - 2006 - Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 5 (2):19-21.
    As feminist theory explicates its fundamental principles – justice for the oppressed – it can lose its essential focus on the situation of women. One example is the inattention to nurses within feminist bioethics. Nurses deserve attention because most are women, but also because their lack of power is paradigmatic of patriarchy. Those examining ethics consultations should discuss whether nurses are allowed to request them. But feminists also need to imagine ways in which nurses can be heard when, for instance, (...)
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  16. The Recycled Fetus: Ethics of Waste and Gift Exchange in New Reproductive Technologies.Mary Rachel Ariss - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Toronto (Canada)
    The goal of this thesis is to expose and analyze the ethical problems of the proposed use of fetal ovarian tissue as a source of donor eggs for infertility treatment, from an embodied, feminist ethical perspective. Fetal ovarian tissue is taken from an aborted fetus and used to help another woman become pregnant. An ethical analysis of this use must begin by considering the construction of pregnancy in the powerful discourses of medicine and law. Medical discourse constructs pregnant women as (...)
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  17. Time, Race, Gender, and Care: Communicative and Strategic Action in Ancillary Care Commentary on Carol Levine's "Caring for Money".Pat Armstrong - 2013 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):118-121.
    Monique Lanoix convincingly argues that what she calls ancillary work requires both communicative and strategic action. As she makes clear, in residential care communicative work is foundational both because strategic speech acts are not enough to fulfill the needs of either residents or care providers and because the space in which they live and work is a home; it is not a system but a lifeworld. As is the case with most interesting articles, this one prompts expansion and additional questions (...)
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  18. Feminism, Bioethics and Genetics.Adrienne Asch & Gail Geller - forthcoming - Feminism and Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.
  19. Reproblematising Relations of Agency and Coercion: Surrogacy.S. Ashenden - 2013 - In Sumi Madhok, Anne Phillips & Kalpana Wilson (eds.), Gender, Agency, and Coercion. Palgrave-Macmillan.
  20. Asistirana humana reprodukcija.Jovan Babić - 2012 - In Ž. Radinković R. Drezgć (ed.), Horizont bioetike: moral u doba tehničke reprodukcije života. Belgrade, Serbia: Institut za filozofiju i društvenu teoriju. pp. 15-67.
    Nove tehnologije omogućavaju nove postupke i prakse koji moraju da se moralno i pravno opravdaju. IVF i surogat materinstvo, pored ostalih, spadaju u takve nove prakse. Stara pravila o tome šta je dopušteno a šta mora da se zabrani ponekad nisu dovoljna, a ni analogije obično nisu dovoljne. Da bi se došlo do prihvatljive linije razdvajanja izmedju opravdanog i neopravdanog postupanja treba izvršiti adekvatnu etičku analizu tih fenomena. IVF, tehnologija oplodnje „in vitro“, iako na prvi pogled izaziva sumnjičavost, ne sadrži (...)
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  21. Human assisted procreation: An ethical approach.Jovan Babić - 1992 - Theoria 35 (4):35-62.
    Nove tehnologije omogućavaju nove postupke i prakse koji moraju da se moralno i pravno opravdaju. IVF i surogat materinstvo, pored ostalih, spadaju u takve nove prakse. Stara pravila o tome šta je dopušteno a šta mora da se zabrani ponekad nisu dovoljna, a ni analogije obično nisu dovoljne. Da bi se došlo do prihvatljive linije razdvajanja izmedju opravdanog i neopravdanog postupanja treba izvršiti adekvatnu etičku analizu tih fenomena. IVF, tehnologija oplodnje „in vitro“, iako na prvi pogled izaziva sumnjičavost, ne sadrži (...)
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  22. Reconceiving Surrogacy: Toward a Reproductive Justice Account of Indian Surrogacy.Alison Bailey - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (4):715-741.
    My project here is to argue for situating moral judgments about Indian surrogacy in the context of Reproductive Justice. I begin by crafting the best picture of Indian surrogacy available to me while marking some worries I have about discursive colonialism and epistemic honesty. Western feminists' responses to contract pregnancy fall loosely into two interrelated moments: post-Baby M discussions that focus on the morality of surrogacy work in Western contexts, and feminist biomedical ethnographies that focus on the lived dimensions of (...)
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  23. The Reproduction of Whiteness: Race and the Regulation of the Gendered Body.Alison Bailey & Jacquelyn N. Zita - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (2):vii-xv.
    Historically critical reflection on whiteness in the United States has been a long-standing practice in slave folklore and in Mexican resistance to colonialism, Asian American struggles against exploitation and containment, and Native American stories of contact with European colonizers. Drawing from this legacy and from the disturbing silence on "whiteness" in postsecondary institutions, critical whiteness scholarship has emerged in the past two decades in U.S. academies in a variety of disciplines. A small number of philosophers, critical race theorists, postcolonial theorists, (...)
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  24. Linking Visions: Feminist Bioethics, Human Rights, and the Developing World.Karen L. Baird, María Julia Bertomeu, Martha Chinouya, Donna L. Dickenson, Michele Harvey-Blankenship, Barbara Ann Hocking, Laura Duhan Kaplan, Jing-Bao Nie, Eileen O'Keefe, Julia Tao Lai Po-wah, Carol Quinn, Arleen L. F. Salles, K. Shanthi, Susana E. Sommer, Rosemarie Tong & Julie Zilberberg - 2004 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This collection brings together fourteen contributions by authors from around the globe. Each of the contributions engages with questions about how local and global bioethical issues are made to be comparable, in the hope of redressing basic needs and demands for justice. These works demonstrate the significant conceptual contributions that can be made through feminists' attention to debates in a range of interrelated fields, especially as they formulate appropriate responses to developments in medical technology, global economics, population shifts, and poverty.
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  25. A Case for Permitting Altruistic Surrogacy.Brenda M. Baker - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):34 - 48.
    Canada's Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies rejects all forms of surrogacy arrangement under the rubric of objecting to commercial surrogacy. Noncommercial surrogacy arrangements, however, can be defended against the commission's objections. They can be viewed as cases of giving a benefit or service to another in a way that expresses benevolence, and establishes a relationship between surrogates and prospective 'social' parents that allows mutual understanding and reciprocal personal interaction between them.
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  26. Feminist Bioethics and Indigenous Research Reform in Australia : Is an Alliance Across Gender, Racial, and Cultural Borders a Useful Strategy for Promoting Change?Jennifer Baker, Terry Dunbar & Margaret Scrimgeour - 2010 - In Jackie Leach Scully, Laurel Baldwin-Ragaven & Petya Fitzpatrick (eds.), Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. Johns Hopkins University Press.
  27. Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation.Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl de Lacey - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145-164.
    As the demand for human eggs for stem cell research increases, debate about appropriate standards for recruitment and compensation of women intensifies. In the majority of cases, the source of eggs for research is women undergoing fertility treatment requiring ovarian stimulation and egg retrieval. The principle of "just participant selection" requires that research subjects be selected from the population that stands to benefit from the research. Based on this principle, infertile women should be actively recruited to donate eggs for fertility-related (...)
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  28. Wanted—Egg Donors for Research: A Research Ethics Approach to Donor Recruitment and Compensation.Angela Ballantyne & Sheryl De Lacey - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):145 - 164.
    As the demand for human eggs for stem cell research increases, debate about appropriate standards for recruitment and compensation of women intensifies. In the majority of cases, the source of eggs for research is women undergoing fertility treatment requiring ovarian stimulation and egg retrieval. The principle of "just participant selection" requires that research subjects be selected from the population that stands to benefit from the research. Based on this principle, infertile women should be actively recruited to donate eggs for fertility-related (...)
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  29. Reorienting the Ethics of Transnational Surrogacy as a Feminist Pragmatist.Amrita Banerjee - 2010 - The Pluralist 5 (3):107-127.
    The issue of surrogacy has received a great deal of attention in the West ever since the famous Baby M case in the latter part of the 1980s. Ethicists, psychologists, and legal experts have struggled with the meanings and implications of this practice, especially in its commercial form. In contemporary times, however, the phenomenon of surrogacy has assumed new dimensions as it travels across national borders in the context of globalization. As a transnational phenomenon, it is now marketed as an (...)
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  30. Seizing the Means of Reproduction.Pauline B. Bart - 1995 - In Penny A. Weiss & Marilyn Friedman (eds.), Feminism and Community. Temple University Press. pp. 105.
  31. Forthcoming. Nonhuman Animal Eggs for Assisted Human Reproduction: A Woman's Choice.Françoise Baylis - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2).
  32. Embodying Bioethics: Recent Feminist Advances.Françoise Baylis, Elisabeth Boetzkes, Alisa L. Carse, Jocelyn Downie, Lisa Handwerker, Helen Bequaert Holmes, Nikki Jones, Hilde Lindemann Nelson, Julien S. Murphy, Barbara Nicholas, Wendy A. Rogers, Mary V. Rorty, Laura Shanner, Susan Sherwin, Anita Silvers, Rosemarie Tong & Susan Wolf - 1999 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Medical issues affecting health care have become everyday media events. In response to mounting public concern, growing numbers of bioethicists are being appointed to medical school faculties and public policy panels. However the ideas voiced in these forums are seldom informed by feminist perspectives. In this important book, a distinguished group of feminist scholars and activists discuss crucial bioethics topics in a feminist light. Among the subjects explored are the care/justice debates, transforming bioethics, practice, and reproduction. The book also covers (...)
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  33. Achieving National Altruistic Self-Sufficiency in Human Eggs for Third-Party Reproduction in Canada.Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):164-184.
    In Canada, the use of reproductive technologies is largely governed by the Assisted Human Reproduction Act . One of the founding principles of the AHR Act is that “trade in the reproductive capabilities of women and men, and the exploitation of children, women and men for commercial ends raise health and ethical concerns that justify their prohibition” ). This principle is instantiated in several sections of the AHR Act, including s. 7, which prohibits the purchase of gametes. It follows that, (...)
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  34. Introduction.Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):1-9.
    Transnational reproductive travel is a largely unfettered multibillion-dollar global industry that flourishes, in part, by capitalizing on differences in legal regimes, wages and standards of living, and cultural and ethical norms. Indeed, as Scott Carney explains with respect to the commercialization of human eggs for third-party reproduction, “internationalization has made oversight laughable. … [R]egulators are dogs with no teeth” . While professional organizations can introduce guidelines and nation-states can introduce laws, the fact is that patients can travel to places where (...)
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  35. The Stem Cell Debate Continues: The Buying and Selling of Eggs for Research.Françoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (12):726-731.
    Now that stem cell scientists are clamouring for human eggs for cloning-based stem cell research, there is vigorous debate about the ethics of paying women for their eggs. Generally speaking, some claim that women should be paid a fair wage for their reproductive labour or tissues, while others argue against the further commodification of reproductive labour or tissues and worry about voluntariness among potential egg providers. Siding mainly with those who believe that women should be financially compensated for providing eggs (...)
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  36. Introduction: Feminism, Autonomy, and Reproductive Technology.Dana Belu, Sylvia Burrow & Elizabeth Soliday - 2012 - Techne 16 (1):1-2.
    This introduction presents the converging points of view (including those from continental philosophy, analytic philosophy, psychology and sociology) on issues regarding reproductive technologies, especially as they relate to childbirth.
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  37. Responding to Vulnerability: The Case of Injection Drug Use.Elizabeth Ben-Ishai - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):39-63.
    "Before they were 'junkies,' they were kids." The words appear on a poster, beneath a montage of photographs of children and the text: "Save Insite." Insite, located in Vancouver, Canada, is North America's first and only supervised injection facility (SIF). At Insite, people who use injection drugs can inject previously obtained drugs, such as heroin and cocaine, under medical supervision, using sterile equipment provided by this government-run facility. Opened under the auspices of a three-year exemption from federal drug laws in (...)
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  38. Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.Leslie Bender - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 25 (1):58-61.
  39. Feminism & Bioethics: Beyond Reproduction.Leslie Bender - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (1):58-61.
  40. Reproduction, Ethics, and the Law: Feminist Perspectives (Book).Laura Benkov - 1996 - Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):265 – 267.
  41. Regulatory Options for Gender Equity in Health Research.Belinda Bennett & Isabel Karpin - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):80-99.
    It is clear that where a disease affects men and women differently, research on potential therapies or cures should include both men and women and should examine whether the therapy is effective and safe for both sexes. In this paper we consider whether there is an appropriate role for law in regulating to ensure an examination of these sex- and gender-specific aspects in health research. We consider the relative advantages and disadvantages of pursuing a regulatory approach to achieving gender equity (...)
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  42. Ethical Issues in Gestational Surrogacy.Rosalie Ber - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (2):153-169.
    The introduction of contraceptive technologies hasresulted in the separation of sex and procreation. Theintroduction of new reproductive technologies (mainlyIVF and embryo transfer) has led not only to theseparation of procreation and sex, but also to there-definition of the terms mother and family.For the purpose of this essay, I will distinguishbetween:1. the genetic mother – the donor of the egg;2. the gestational mother – she who bears and gives birth to the baby;3. the social mother – the woman who raises the (...)
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  43. Mary Briody Mahowald,Bioethics and Women Across the Life Span.Véronique Bergeron - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):179-182.
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  44. Bioethics and Women Across the Life Span (Review).Véronique Bergeron - 2008 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (2):179-182.
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  45. Bioethics, Globalization, and Politics.M. Julia Bertomeu - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):33-51.
    Bioethics has evolved from a non-institutional, ideal, and ahistorical model toward a more political, institutional, and historically anchored one. This change is healthy and has, in part, been a product of the devastating consequences of globalization. I illustrate the distinct moments in the evolution of bioethics with an analysis of three discussions within the discipline: the debate on autonomy and the right to health (points 1 and 2) and some of the issues raised by biotechnology (point 3), especially by the (...)
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  46. Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Technology in a Pluralistic World: A Development and Application of a Hindu Ethic.Swasti Bhattacharyya - 2002 - Dissertation, University of Southern California
    Reproductive technology is in the forefront of medical research and contemporary bioethical debates. In the United States, ethical issues involved are often framed by conflicts among legal, scientific, and religious perspectives. The primary religious voices influencing these North American discussions are those grounded in various Jewish and Christian traditions. However, this country is known for its religious and cultural diversity. This diversity of worldviews presents challenges that the field of bioethics needs to address. My goal is to inform and contribute (...)
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  47. " The Family Is a Factory": Gender, Citizenship, and the Regulation of Reproduction in Postwar Egypt.Laura Bier - 2010 - Feminist Studies 36 (2):404-432.
  48. Madonna Minus Child. Or—Wanted: Dead or Alive! The Right to Have a Dead Partner's Child.Hazel Biggs - 1997 - Feminist Legal Studies 5 (2):225-234.
  49. Vulnerability, Health, and Illness.Robyn Bluhm - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):147-161.
    It seems clear that being sick makes people vulnerable. Not only can even relatively mild, transient illnesses such as colds or flus serve as an unpleasant reminder of the vulnerability of the usual state of health that many of us are fortunate enough to enjoy, but more serious, chronic conditions can force individuals to adapt—or even abandon—life plans or projects, and can also alter their self-conception. Yet philosophical theories of health and disease do not discuss vulnerability, nor does it have (...)
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  50. Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins. [REVIEW]Robyn Bluhm - 2011 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):154-159.
    Feminist Bioethics: At the Center, on the Margins is a collection of essays that “reflect on the positioning of feminist bioethics” (xi). The volume editors suggest that the discipline of feminist bioethics, twenty years after it began, faces tension between becoming incorporated into mainstream bioethics, which would mean that it has greater influence on bioethics as a whole, and remaining “on the margins,” where it can perhaps better continue its critical project of drawing attention to the ways in which “dominant (...)
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