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Summary Arising at the intersection of the sub-disciplines of bioethics and feminist philosophy, feminist bioethics was largely dominated by questions of reproduction in its early years. More recently, the concerns of this field have diversified, to include topics such as ageing, end-of-life decision-making, consent and substituted decision-making, mental health ethics and care relations, to name but a few. Feminist approaches to bioethical issues have tended to emphasise the theoretical and ethical importance of embodiment, care, vulnerability and dependence rather than ideas of rationality and autonomy. That said, feminists involved in this area have also generated important new ways of thinking about moral agency, such as in relational autonomy, for instance. 
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  1. added 2018-12-03
    ART and Age − Gender Stereotypes in Medical Students’ Views.Anna Alichniewicz & Monika Michałowska - 2015 - Diametros 45:71-81.
    It seems interesting to find out how the situation of the Polish ART practice is reflected in the medical students’ opinions. To answer this question we carried out a two-stage research adopting a data-driven methodology based upon the grounded theory, in which we collected a mixture of quantitative and qualitative data. Our study has revealed students’ high acceptance of IVF and most of the additional procedures, except for IVF in the case of women over 40 and postmenopausal ones. The students’ (...)
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  2. added 2018-10-07
    Whither Bioethics Now? The Promise of Relational Theory.Susan Sherwin & Katie Stockdale - 2017 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (1):7-29.
    This article reflects on the work of feminist bioethicists over the past ten years, reviewing how effective feminists have been in using relational theory to reorient bioethics and where we hope it will go from here. Feminist bioethicists have made significant achievements using relational theory to shape the notion of autonomy, bringing to light the relevance of patients' social circumstances and where they are situated within systems of privilege and oppression. But there is much work to be done to reorient (...)
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  3. added 2018-08-22
    Reproductive Choice: Screening Policy and Access to the Means of Reproduction.Lucinda Vandervort - 2006 - Human Rights Quarterly 28 (2):438-464.
    The practice of screening potential users of reproductive services is of profound social and political significance. Access screening is inconsistent with the principles of equality and self-determination, and violates individual and group human rights. Communities that strive to function in accord with those principles should not permit access screening, even screening that purports to be a benign exercise of professional discretion. Because reproductive choice is controversial, regulation by law may be required in most jurisdictions to provide effective protection for reproductive (...)
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  4. added 2018-06-29
    Gender Differences in Depression: Explanations From Feminist Ethics.Robyn Bluhm - 2011 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1):69-88.
    Feminist bioethics is committed to recognizing the way that power differentials arising from differences in social location shape health and health care, and also to ensuring that women's experiences inform bioethical analyses (Sherwin 1992, 1998; Scully et al. 2010). Yet there may be a tension between these two points of emphasis, not because they are incompatible but because they require very different perspectives. In this article, I argue that feminist analyses of the relationship between gender and mental disorder have tended (...)
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  5. added 2018-05-08
    A Feminist Bioethics Approach to Diagnostic Uncertainty.Anna K. Swartz - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (5):37-39.
  6. added 2018-03-11
    Sex in Medicine: What Stands in the Way of Credibility?Mari Mikkola - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):479-488.
    Childfree females encounter greater obstacles in obtaining voluntary sterilizations than childfree males. This paper discusses what might explain this and it proposes that female patients encounter particular credibility deficits that undermine their ability to grant informed consent. In particular, the paper explores Miranda Fricker’s recent suggestion that members of structurally disadvantaged groups encounter a particular sort of injustice that harms them in their capacity as knowers: they sustain testimonial injustice. The task of the paper is to investigate whether and in (...)
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  7. added 2018-02-18
    Feminist Reflections on Miscarriage, in Light of Abortion.Kate Parsons - 2010 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (1):1-22.
    In 2006, and again in 2007, I suffered the miscarriages of two wanted and painstakingly planned pregnancies. In the aftermath of each, I found myself unprepared, as do many women who miscarry, for the devastation I would feel. In my attempts to cope, I sought solace in the written testimony of other women who had miscarried, in the medical statistics that reassured me I still had a strong chance of carrying another pregnancy to term, in the experiences of friends and (...)
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  8. added 2018-02-17
    At the Intersections of Emotional and Biological Labor: Understanding Transnational Commercial Surrogacy as Social Reproduction.G. K. D. Crozier, Jennifer L. Johnson & Christopher Hajzler - 2014 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):45-74.
    This paper focuses on how surrogacy is to be valued in the transnational context, and what it means for surrogacy to be considered a form of paid, social reproductive labor. By social reproduction, we refer to the social processes and activities, such as child rearing and caring for dependents, that are necessary to uphold a productive society. Since these are complex and nuanced questions, and ones that are likely to need different answers in different countries and social contexts, this paper (...)
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  9. added 2018-02-17
    Challenges for Assisted Reproduction and Secondary Infertility in Latin America.Florencia Luna & Allison B. Wolf - 2014 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):3-27.
    … and the feminists understand perfectly that infertility carries a heavy burden for women. However, they have ambivalent feelings in relation to supporting them in their search for treatments that will resolve their infertility because they feel as if they would be contributing to reinforcing traditional gender roles. It is this tension that has strongly framed the relationship between those who are in favor of these assisted reproductive technologies … and feminists[.]In this essay, I want to explore a new way (...)
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  10. added 2018-02-17
    Feminist Issues in Domestic and Transnational Surrogacy: The Case of Japan.Jennifer Parks - 2014 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):121-143.
    A feminist viewpoint on globalized commercial surrogacy questions what best serves women’s needs/ends and whether the practice is good for women . My interest in this paper is to consider how a feminist account might address the practice of surrogacy in Japan, both domestically and in the transnational context. Japanese culture emphasizes traditional values, family heritage, and communitarian concerns over individual rights. Women’s equality, while formally recognized by the Japanese Constitution, is undercut by actual practices and recent court decisions . (...)
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  11. added 2018-02-17
    Conditions of Care: Migration, Vulnerability, and Individual Autonomy.Christine Straehle - 2013 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):122-140.
    International migration has a female face in the beginning of the twenty-first century; since at least 1990, a total of 49 percent of international migrants have been women (UN 2008).1 Many women relocate in pursuit of goals that they can’t realize in their countries of origin, and many women move on their own to developed countries as caregivers to the very old or the very young, as nurses to attend to the sick in hospitals, and as domestic workers.2 How should (...)
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  12. added 2018-02-17
    The Other Side of Care: Some Thoughts on Caregiving and Grief.Anna Gotlib - 2013 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):179-184.
  13. added 2018-02-17
    Care Ethics and Corporeal Inquiry in Patient Relations.Maurice Hamington - 2012 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):52-69.
    Practically every development in medicine in the post–World War II period distanced the physician and the hospital from the patient and the community, disrupting personal connections and severing bonds of trust. We need an ethics that include bodily mediated knowledge as a complement to intellectual knowledge. Care is a challenging concept to explore, in part because it is employed widely and often without thoughtful parsing. Moreover, it has gained increasing significance in ethical discourse.1 Since the 1980s, feminist theorists have used (...)
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  14. added 2018-02-17
    Vulnerability, Health, and Illness.Robyn Bluhm - 2012 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (2):147-161.
    It seems clear that being sick makes people vulnerable. Not only can even relatively mild, transient illnesses such as colds or flus serve as an unpleasant reminder of the vulnerability of the usual state of health that many of us are fortunate enough to enjoy, but more serious, chronic conditions can force individuals to adapt—or even abandon—life plans or projects, and can also alter their self-conception. Yet philosophical theories of health and disease do not discuss vulnerability, nor does it have (...)
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  15. added 2018-02-17
    “Before You Formed in the Womb I Knew You”: Sex Selection and Spaces of Ambiguity.Anna Mudde - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (3):553-576.
    The spaces provided by biotechnologies of sex selection are rich with epistemological, ontological, and ethical considerations that speak to broadly held social values and epistemic frameworks. In much of the discourse about sex sehction that is not medically indicated, the figure of the "naturally" conceived (future) child is treated as a problem f or parents who want to select the sex of their child. As unknown, that child is ambiguous in terms of sex — "it" is both and neither, and (...)
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  16. added 2018-02-17
    Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  17. added 2018-02-17
    Planning a Trip to Italy, Arriving in Holland: The Delusion of Choice in Planning a Family.Eva Feder Kittay - 2010 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):9-24.
    The title of this paper deserves an explanation—or rather two explanations, one for the portion preceding the colon, the other for that following as the subtitle. The first part is derived from a short essay by Emily Perl Kingsley, written in 1987 in response to questions she had received about what it is like to raise a child with Down Syndrome.1 Kingsley suggests that planning for a child is like planning a trip to some wonderful destination—in her example, Italy. She (...)
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  18. added 2018-02-17
    Care for the Caregivers? Transnational Justice and Undocumented Non-Citizen Care Workers.Zahra Meghani & Lisa Eckenwiler - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):77-101.
    In recent years, the flow of undocumented labor from the global South to richer nations has increased considerably. Many undocumented women workers find employment as caregivers for the dependent elderly, whose numbers are burgeoning in affluent countries. Here we present a profile of undocumented non-citizen caregivers in the United States and delineate some of the key injustices they suffer. After identifying the causal factors responsible for the flow of undocumented labor from the global South to richer nations like the United (...)
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  19. added 2018-02-17
    Book Review: Abby L. Wilkerson. Diagnosis: Difference: The Moral Authority of Medicine. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1998. [REVIEW]Susan Sherwin - 2001 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 16 (3):172-176.
  20. added 2017-09-07
    The Value of Dignity in and for Bioethics: Rethinking the Terms of the Debate.Clair Morrissey - 2016 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37 (3):173-192.
    The discussion of the nature and value of dignity in and for bioethics concerns not only the importance of the concept but also the aims of bioethics itself. Here, I challenge the claim that the concept of dignity is useless by challenging the implicit conception of usefulness involved. I argue that the conception of usefulness that both opponents and proponents of dignity in bioethics adopt is rooted in a narrow understanding of the role of normative theory in practical ethical thinking. (...)
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  21. added 2017-08-31
    Epistemic Negligence at the Seams of Permissibility: Assessing Epistemic Injustice in Bioethics.D. C. Mendoza-Cervantez - 2017 - Dissertation, Johns Hopkins
    Recent explorations of the territory between epistemology and ethics identify a distinctively epistemic form of injustice through which an individual can be harmed in their capacity as a knower. Starting with Miranda Fricker’s important account, the growing literature on epistemic injustice has broadened our understanding of this capacity to include an individual’s participation in epistemic practices of questioning, justification, communication, and evaluation of truth. Theorists challenge Fricker’s account of prejudicial identity bias as the source of harm of epistemic injustice. An (...)
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  22. added 2017-02-12
    Asistirana humana reprodukcija.Jovan Babić - 2012 - In Ž. Radinković R. Drezgć (ed.), Horizont bioetike: moral u doba tehničke reprodukcije života. Belgrade, Serbia: Institut za filozofiju i društvenu teoriju. pp. 15-67.
    Nove tehnologije omogućavaju nove postupke i prakse koji moraju da se moralno i pravno opravdaju. IVF i surogat materinstvo, pored ostalih, spadaju u takve nove prakse. Stara pravila o tome šta je dopušteno a šta mora da se zabrani ponekad nisu dovoljna, a ni analogije obično nisu dovoljne. Da bi se došlo do prihvatljive linije razdvajanja izmedju opravdanog i neopravdanog postupanja treba izvršiti adekvatnu etičku analizu tih fenomena. IVF, tehnologija oplodnje „in vitro“, iako na prvi pogled izaziva sumnjičavost, ne sadrži (...)
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  23. added 2017-02-12
    Women and the New Reproductive Technologies: Medical, Psychosocial, Legal and Ethical Dilemmas. Edited by Rodin Judith. & Collins Aila. Pp. 171. (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 1991.) £22.50. [REVIEW]Erica Haimes - 1993 - Journal of Biosocial Science 25 (2):283-284.
  24. added 2017-02-12
    Human assisted procreation: An ethical approach.Jovan Babić - 1992 - Theoria 35 (4):35-62.
    Nove tehnologije omogućavaju nove postupke i prakse koji moraju da se moralno i pravno opravdaju. IVF i surogat materinstvo, pored ostalih, spadaju u takve nove prakse. Stara pravila o tome šta je dopušteno a šta mora da se zabrani ponekad nisu dovoljna, a ni analogije obično nisu dovoljne. Da bi se došlo do prihvatljive linije razdvajanja izmedju opravdanog i neopravdanog postupanja treba izvršiti adekvatnu etičku analizu tih fenomena. IVF, tehnologija oplodnje „in vitro“, iako na prvi pogled izaziva sumnjičavost, ne sadrži (...)
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  25. added 2017-02-11
    Public Health, Private Parts: A Feminist Public-Health Approach to Trans Issues.Krista Scott-Dixon - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (3):33 - 55.
    This paper identifies and examines the possible contributions that emerging fields of study, particularly feminist public health, can make to enhancing and expanding trans/feminist theory and practice. A feminist public-health approach that is rooted in a tradition of political economy, social justice and equity studies, and an anti-oppression orientation, provides one of the most comprehensive "toolboxes" of perspectives, theoretical frameworks, methods, practices, processes, and strategies for trans-oriented scholars and activists.
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  26. added 2017-02-11
    Diagnosis: Difference: The Moral Authority of Medicine (Review).Susan Sherwin - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (3):172-176.
  27. added 2017-02-09
    On Procreative Responsibility in Assisted and Collaborative Reproduction.Melissa Seymour Fahmy - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (1):55-70.
    Abstract It is common practice to regard participants in assisted and collaborative reproduction (gamete donors, embryologists, fertility doctors, etc.) as simply providing a desired biological product or medical service. These agents are not procreators in the ordinary sense, nor do they stand in any kind of meaningful parental relation to the resulting offspring. This paper challenges the common view by defending a principle of procreative responsibility and then demonstrating that this standard applies as much to those who provide reproductive assistance (...)
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  28. added 2017-02-08
    The Vulnerability of the Very Sick.Jerry Menikoff - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):51-58.
    When seriously ill patients for whom existing treatments are inadequate are invited to participate in clinical trials that offer a new treatment, should those persons be considered “vulnerable”? And if so, what additional protections should they be accorded? This article attempts to provide some answers.
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  29. added 2017-02-07
    Working on the Margins: Feminist Theory and Philosophy.Charlotte Witt - 1996 - Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):226-229.
  30. added 2017-02-01
    Surrogates & Other Mothers: The Debates Over Assisted Reproduction (Book).Kathy Weingarten - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (2):188 – 192.
  31. added 2017-01-30
    The Growing Feminist Debate Over the New Reproductive Technologies.Anne Donchin - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (3):136-149.
  32. added 2017-01-29
    Reproductive Futures: Recent Literature and Current Feminist Debates on Reproductive Technologies.Sarah Franklin - 1988 - Feminist Studies 14 (3):545.
  33. added 2017-01-27
    Women Perspectives on Bioethics in Human Reproduction Research: Women's Viewpoint.K. Omran & G. I. Serour - forthcoming - Proceedings of the First International Conference on Bioethics in Human Reproduction Research in the Muslim's World.
  34. added 2017-01-27
    We Cant Stop Now. Pakistan and the Politics of Reproduction.Hilda Saeed, D. da ColemanCarr, A. Way, K. Neitzel, A. Blanc, E. Jamison, S. Kishor, K. Stewart & H. Booth - 1994 - Journal of Biosocial Science 26 (1):135-48.
  35. added 2017-01-26
    Feminists on the Commodification and (in) Alienability of Human Embryos in Research.C. McLeod & F. Baylis - forthcoming - Hypatia.
  36. added 2017-01-26
    Donating Life-Ethical Reflections Over Donation of and Payment for Sperm, Eggs, and Embryos.Kirsten Hansen - 2007 - In Laurie DiMauro (ed.), International Journal of Ethics. Greenhaven Press. pp. 4--4.
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  37. added 2017-01-26
    Regulating New Reproductive and Genetic Technologies: A Feminist View of Recent Canadian Government Initiatives.Mariana Valverde & Lorna Weir - 1997 - Feminist Studies 23 (2):418.
  38. added 2017-01-26
    Whose Body? Feminist Views on Reproductive Technology.Max Charlesworth - 1995 - In Paul A. Komesaroff (ed.), Troubled Bodies: Critical Perspectives on Postmodernism, Medical Ethics, and the Body. Duke University Press. pp. 125--41.
  39. added 2017-01-26
    Ethics and Human Reproduction.Thelma Mccormack - 1990 - In Don MacNiven (ed.), Moral Expertise: Studies in Practical and Professional Ethics. Routledge.
  40. added 2017-01-25
    From Bioethics to Biopolitics: Contemporary Issues and New Challenges in Women Health.Ughetta Vergari - 2011 - International Journal of Ethics 7 (2).
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  41. added 2017-01-24
    Globalizing Feminist Bioethics: Crosscultural Perspectives (Review).Julie M. Zilberberg - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (2):208-210.
  42. added 2017-01-21
    Book Review:Women and Children in Health Care: An Unequal Majority. Mary Briody Mahowald. [REVIEW]Joan C. Callahan - 1995 - Ethics 105 (4):950-.
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  43. added 2017-01-20
    The Gift of the Other: Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction (Review).Ewa Plonowska Ziarek - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 225-228.
  44. added 2017-01-20
    The Donation of Eggs for Research and the Rise of Neopaternalism.Emily Jackson - 2008 - In Michael D. A. Freeman (ed.), Law and Bioethics / Edited by Michael Freeman. Oxford University Press.
  45. added 2017-01-19
    Bioethics, Biotechnology and Culture: A Voice From the Margins.Godfrey B. Tangwa - 2004 - Developing World Bioethics 4 (2):125–138.
    I argue for the universality of morality as against and in spite of the plurality and inevitable relativity of human cultures. Univer.
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  46. added 2017-01-18
    Can We Broker Eggs Without Making Omelets?Jeffrey Kahn - 2001 - American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):14 – 15.
  47. added 2017-01-18
    A Response to Purdy.Susan Dodds & Karen Jones - 1989 - Bioethics 3 (1):35–39.
  48. added 2017-01-17
    Fitness, Well-Being, and Preparation for Death.Moira Howes - 2016 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (2):115-140.
    In this article, I argue that we should revise our understanding of physical fitness to include preparation for challenging physically mediated life experiences—such as aging, disability, illness, reproduction, and death—as an important goal of physical activity. Such a revision is needed because the messages about fitness we encounter through “fitness ideology” can undermine the cultivation of skills and perspectives important for finding meaning, equanimity, and even happiness in light of such experiences. Because one of the ways that fitness ideology undermines (...)
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  49. added 2017-01-17
    Achieving National Altruistic Self-Sufficiency in Human Eggs for Third-Party Reproduction in Canada.Françoise Baylis & Jocelyn Downie - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (2):164-184.
    In Canada, the use of reproductive technologies is largely governed by the Assisted Human Reproduction Act . One of the founding principles of the AHR Act is that “trade in the reproductive capabilities of women and men, and the exploitation of children, women and men for commercial ends raise health and ethical concerns that justify their prohibition” ). This principle is instantiated in several sections of the AHR Act, including s. 7, which prohibits the purchase of gametes. It follows that, (...)
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  50. added 2017-01-17
    The Time of the Change: Menopause's Medicalization and the Gender Politics of Aging. van de Wiel - 2014 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 7 (1):74-98.
    As a nexus of fertility’s finitude and female midlife, menopause is a physical and cultural phenomenon through which the relation between the medicalization of the female reproductive cycle and normative attitudes toward aging become expressed. Age, like other systems of separation, can function as an “instrument of regulatory regimes” and shows similarities to gender in its body-bound, surface-focused, and morally coded position in the sociomedical sphere. However, although age is an influential social category, its reliance on historical and epistemic constructions (...)
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