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  1. “The Only Diabolical Thing About Women…”: Luce Irigaray on Divinity.Penelope Deutscher - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (4):88-111.
    Luce Irigaray's argument that women need a feminine divine is placed in the context of her analyses of the interconnection between man's appropriation of woman as his "negative alter ego" and his identification with the impossible ego ideal represented by the figure of God. As an alternative, the "feminine divine" is conceived as a realm with which women would be continuous. It would allow mediation between humans, and interrupt cannibalizing appropriations of the other.
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  2. From Domination to Recognition. Aboulafia - 1984 - In Carol Gould (ed.), Beyond Domination: New Perspectives on Women and Philosophy. pp. 175-185.
  3. Contemporary Feminist Theories.Stevi Jackson & Jacki Jones (eds.) - 1998
  4. American Feminist Thought at Century's End a Reader.Linda S. Kauffman - 1993
  5. Femmes, Écriture, Philosophie.Lise Pelletier, Guy Bouchard & Université Laval - 1987
    Dans cet ouvrage collectif, l'article de Guy Bouchard intitulé "Comment émasculiniser l' écriture philosophique" met d'abord en lumière le sexisme qui a caractérisé tant la philosophie que le langage en général; il s'interroge ensuite sur les façons "d'émasculiniser" l' écriture philosophique et au niveau de la pensée, et à celui du langage.
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  6. Nomadic Musings: Living and Thinking Queerly.Shelley M. Park - 2007 - APA Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 7:1 (2007) 7 (1):17-20.
  7. Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood: Resisting Monomaternalism in Adoptive, Lesbian, Blended and Polygamous Families.Shelley M. Park - 2013 - New York: SUNY.
    Bridging the gap between feminist studies of motherhood and queer theory, Mothering Queerly, Queering Motherhood articulates a provocative philosophy of queer kinship that need not be rooted in lesbian or gay sexual identities. Working from an interdisciplinary framework that incorporates feminist philosophy and queer, psychoanalytic, poststructuralist, and postcolonial theories, Shelley M. Park offers a powerful critique of an ideology she terms monomaternalism. Despite widespread cultural insistence that every child should have one—and only one—“real” mother, many contemporary family constellations do not (...)
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  8. Book Review: Amy Allen. The Power of Feminist Theory. Boulder: Westview Press, 1999. [REVIEW]Jana Sawicki - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):222-226.
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Feminist Philosophy, General Works
  1. New Data on the Representation of Women in Philosophy Journals: 2004–2015.Isaac Wilhelm, Sherri Lynn Conklin & Nicole Hassoun - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (6):1441-1464.
    This paper presents new data on the representation of women who publish in 25 top philosophy journals as ranked by the Philosophical Gourmet Report for the years 2004, 2014, and 2015. It also provides a new analysis of Schwitzgebel’s 1955–2015 journal data. The paper makes four points while providing an overview of the current state of women authors in philosophy. In all years and for all journals, the percentage of female authors was extremely low, in the range of 14–16%. The (...)
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  2. Resisters, Diversity in Philosophy, and the Demographic Problem.James Kidd Ian - 2017 - Rivista di Estetica 64:118-133.
    The discipline of academic philosophy suffers from serious problems of diversity and inclusion whose acknowledgement and amelioration are often resisted by members of our profession. In this paper, I distinguish four main modes of resistance—naiveté, conservatism, pride, and hostility—and describe how and why they manifest by using them as the basis for a typology of types of ‘resister’. This typology can hopefully be useful to those of us trying to counteract such resistance in ways sensitive to the different motives and (...)
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  3. Die Geschlechtstheorie Freuds: Ihre Neuartigkeit Und Anwendung Auf den Feminismus.Yusuke Kaneko - 2017 - HACETTEPE UNIVERSITY JOURNAL OF FACULTY OF LETTERS 33 (2):150-167.
    Not a few feminist writers, such as Kristeva, Irigaray, and Chodorow, have dealt with Freud’s psychoanalysis so far, but it is not clear to what degree the Freudian theory grounds their arguments, because Freud himself developed his psychoanalysis mainly for the male mental world (Seelenleben). In this paper, we shall follow Freud’s train of thought exclusively from this angle. After the geneses of Pcpt.-Cs., id, ego, and super-ego (W-Bw, Es, Ich, and Über-Ich, respectively) are treated (§§7-10), we shed light on (...)
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  4. Dredging the Third Wave: Reflections on the Feminism of the Nineties.Letitia Mercia Meynell - 2001 - Social Philosophy Today 17:179-201.
    In this paper I examine third wave leminism in the hopes of shedding light on its relationship to the concurrent contemporary backlash against leminism. I investigate this by attempting to answer two questions. First, given the nature of the first and second waves, is the third wave appropriately so called? I tentatively conclude that it is not. Second, I ask whether the issue of identity, which is central to third wave analysis, is addressed well by third wavers. I suggest that (...)
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  5. Rebuilding the Feminine in Levinas's Talmudic Readings.Hanoch Ben-Pazi - 2003 - Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 12 (3):pp. 1–32.
    This study presents a reconsideration of Levinas’s concept of the feminine. This reconsideration facilitated by a philosophically informed analysis of Levinas’s Talmudic readings on that subject. The innovation of this research is based on the methodology which combined the two corpuses of Levinas’ writings as important parts of his thought. Two main phenomena are derived from Levinas’ Talmudic readings and arouse main principles of his ethics. In the hearth of the discussion on Eros stated the differentiation of feminine and masculine (...)
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  6. A Moral Imperative: Retaining Women of Color in Science Education.Angela Johnson, Sybol Cook Anderson & Kathryn J. Norlock - 2009 - Atlantis: Critical Studies in Gender, Culture and Social Justice 33 (2):72-82.
    This article considers the experiences of a group of women science students of color who reported encountering moral injustices, including misrecognition, lack of peer support, and disregard for their altruistic motives. We contend that university science departments face a moral imperative to cultivate equal relationships and the altruistic power of science.
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  7. The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and its Role in Feminist Philosophy.Mari Mikkola - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book examines contemporary structural social injustices from a feminist perspective. It asks: what makes oppression, discrimination, and domination wrongful? Is there a single wrongness-making feature of various social injustices that are due to social kind membership? Why is sexist oppression of women wrongful? What does the wrongfulness of patriarchal damage done to women consist in? In thinking about what normatively grounds social injustice, the book puts forward two related views. First, it argues for a paradigm shift in focus away (...)
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  8. Why Do Women Leave Philosophy? Surveying Students at the Introductory Level.Morgan Thompson, Toni Adleberg, Sam Sims & Eddy Nahmias - 2016 - Philosophers' Imprint 16.
    Although recent research suggests that women are underrepresented in philosophy after initial philosophy courses, there have been relatively few empirical investigations into the factors that lead to this early drop-off in women’s representation. In this paper, we present the results of empirical investigations at a large American public university that explore various factors contributing to women’s underrepresentation in philosophy at the undergraduate level. We administered climate surveys to hundreds of students completing their Introduction to Philosophy course and examined differences in (...)
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  9. The Logic of the Observed.Talia Welsh - 2001 - Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 5 (1):83-94.
    The first line of Merleau-Ponty 's 1951-52 lecture "The Question of Method in Child Psychology" readt, "In child psychology (as in psychopathology, the psychology of primitives, and the psychology ofwomen), the situation ofthe object of study is so different from that ofthe observer that it cannot be grasped on its own terms." Is there any hope for a feminist reading of Merleau-Ponty's psychology with such a statement, or are women relegated in Merleau-Ponty's corpus alongside the childlike, the insane, and the (...)
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  10. The Productive Power of Ambiguity: Rethinking Homosexuality Through the Virtual and Developmental Systems Theory.Ann Burlein - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):21-53.
  11. Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect.Marguerite la Caze - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  12. Who's Afraid of the Sophists? Against Ethical Correctness.Barbara Cassin - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (4):102-120.
  13. Women, “False” Memory, and Personal Identity.Sue Campbell - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):51-82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  14. “Maleness” Revisited.Susan Bordo - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):197-207.
    My response to the preceding commentaries draws on recent events such as the Thomas/Hill hearings to illustrate some of my central arguments in "Feminist Skepticism and the 'Maleness' of Philosophy." I also attempt to clarify frequently misunderstood aspects of my use of gender as an analytical category, and discuss why, in my opinion, we should continue to care about the "maleness" of philosophy.
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  15. Possible and Questionable: Opening Nietzsche's Genealogy to Feminine Body.Kristen Brown - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):39-58.
    According to Kelly Oliver and Elizabeth Grosz, while Friedrich Nietzsche begins to open Western philosophy to the other, the body, he cuts off feminine body. Here I create a framework through which the possibility and questionability of a symbolically feminine body begins to emerge. I do this by using the metaphor of Indian curry. The metaphor works on two levels: 1) as a symbolically feminine body; 2) as Nietzsche's conception of subject-formation as a dynamic monism.
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  16. Thinking About Ecological Thinking.Lorraine Code - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):187-203.
  17. February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body.Debra Bergoffen - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  18. Feminine Stubble.Rachel Burgess - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):230-237.
  19. The Promise of Feminist Reflexivities: Developing Donna Haraway's Project for Feminist Science Studies.Kirsten Campbell - 2004 - Hypatia 19 (1):162-182.
    This paper explores models of reflexive feminist science studies through the work of Donna Haraway. The paper argues that Haraway provides an important account of science studies that is both feminist and constructivist. However, her concepts of "situated knowledges" and "diffraction" need further development to be adequate models of feminist science studies. To develop this constructivist and feminist project requires a collective research program that engages with feminist reflexivity as a practice.
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  20. Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination.Sandra Bartky - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  21. Same-Sex Marriage: Why It Matters—At Least for Now.Joan Callahan - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (1):70-80.
    This paper addresses the progressive, feminist critique of same-sex marriage as articulated by Claudia Card. Although agreeing with Card that the institution of marriage as we know it is profoundly morally flawed in its origins and effects, Callahan disagrees with Card's suggestion that queer activists in the United States should not be working for the inclusion of same-sex couples in the institution.
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  22. Feminist Second Thoughts About Free Agency.Paul Benson - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):47-64.
    This essay suggests that common themes in recent feminist ethical thought can dislodge the guiding assumptions of traditional theories of free agency and thereby foster an account of freedom which might be more fruitful for feminist discussion of moral and political agency. The essay proposes constructing that account around a condition of normative-competence. It argues that this view permits insight into why women's labor of reclaiming and augmenting their agency is both difficult and possible in a sexist society.
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  23. The Logic of the Development of Feminism; or, Is MacKinnon to Feminism as Parmenides Is to Greek Philosophy?Susan E. Bernick - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (1):1-15.
    Catharine MacKinnon's investigation of the role of sexuality in the subordination of women is a logical culmination of radical feminist thought. If this is correct, the position of her work relative to radical feminism is analogous to the place Parmenides's work occupied in ancient Greek philosophy. Critics of MacKinnon's work have missed their target completely and must engage her work in a different way if feminist theory is to progress past its current stalemated malaise.
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  24. Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest.Debra B. Bergoffen - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  25. How Ecological Should Epistemology Be?Richmond Campbell - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):161-169.
  26. The Encounter Between Wonder and Generosity.Marguerite la Caze - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):1-19.
    In a reading of René Descartes's The Passions of the Soul, Luce Irigaray explores the possibility that wonder, first of all passions, can provide the basis for an ethics of sexual difference because it is prior to judgment, and thus nonhierarchical. For Descartes, the passion of generosity gives the key to ethics. I argue that wonder should be extended to other differences and should be combined with generosity to form the basis of an ethics.
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  27. A Hasty Retreat From Evidence: The Recalcitrance of Relativism in Feminist Epistemology.Sharyn Clough - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):88-111.
    While feminist epistemologists have made important contributions to the deconstruction of the traditional representationalist model, some elements of the Cartesian legacy remain. For example, relativism continues to play a role in the underdetermination thesis used by Longino and Keller. Both argue that because scientific theories are underdetermined by evidence, theory choice must be relative to interpretive frameworks. Utilizing Davidson's philosophy of language, I offer a nonrepresentationalist alternative to suggest how relativism can be more fully avoided.
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  28. Definition and the Question of “Woman”.Victoria Barker - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):185-215.
    Within recent feminist philosophy, controversy has developed over the desirability, and indeed, the possibility of defining the central terms of its analysis-"woman," "femininity," etc. The controversy results largely from the undertheorization of the notion of definition; feminists have uncritically adopted an Aristotelian treatment of definition as entailing metaphysical, rather than merely linguistic, commitments. A "discursive" approach to definition, by contrast, allows us to define our terms, while avoiding the dangers of essentialism and universalism.
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  29. Evil Deceivers and Make-Believers: On Transphobic Violence and the Politics of Illusion.Talia Mae Bettcher - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (3):43-65.
    This essay examines the stereotype that transgender people are "deceivers" and the stereotype's role in promoting and excusing transphobic violence. The stereotype derives from a contrast between gender presentation and sexed body. Because gender presentation represents genital status, Bettcher argues, people who "misalign" the two are viewed as deceivers. The author shows how this system of gender presentation as genital representation is part of larger sexist and racist systems of violence and oppression.
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  30. Responsibility Ethics, Shared Understandings, and Moral Communities.Claudia Card - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):141-155.
    Margaret Walker's Moral Understandings offers an "expressive-collaborative," culturally situated, practice-based picture of morality, critical of a "theoretical-juridical" picture in most prefeminist moral philosophy since Henry Sidgwick. This essay compares her approach to ethics with that of John Rawls, another exemplar of the "theoretical-juridical" model, and asks how Walker's approach would apply to several ethical issues, including interaction with animals, social reform and revolution, and basic human rights.
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  31. Mary Astell: Defender of the “Disembodied Mind”.Cynthia B. Bryson - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (4):40-62.
    This paper demonstrates how Mary Astell's version of Cartesian dualism supports her disavowal of female subordination and traditional gender roles, her rejection of Locke's notion of "thinking matter" as a major premise for rejecting his political philosophy of "social contracts" between men and women, and, finally, her claim that there is no intrinsic difference between genders in terms of ratiocination, the primary assertion that grants her the title of the first female English feminist.
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  32. Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  33. Gay Divorce: Thoughts on the Legal Regulation of Marriage.Claudia Card - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1):24-38.
    Although the exclusion of LGBTs from the rites and rights of marriage is arbitrary and unjust, the legal institution of marriage is itself so riddled with injustice that it would be better to create alternative forms of durable intimate partnership that do not invoke the power of the state. Card's essay develops a case for this position, taking up an injustice sufficiently serious to constitute an evil: the sheltering of domestic violence.
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  34. The Political Structure of Emotion: From Dismissal to Dialogue.Sylvia Burrow - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):27-43.
    How much power does emotional dismissal have over the oppressed's ability to trust outlaw emotions, or to stand for such emotions before others? I discuss Sue Campbell's view of the interpretation of emotion in light of the political significance of emotional dismissal. In response, I suggest that feminist conventions of interpretation developed within dialogical communities are best suited to providing resources for expressing, interpreting, defining, and reflecting on our emotions.
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  35. Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification.Ann J. Cahill - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's equality (...)
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  36. A Woman’s Scorn.Macalester Bell - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (4):80-93.
    In an effort to reclaim women's moral psychology, feminist philosophers have reevaluated several seemingly negative emotions such as anger, resentment, and bitterness. However, one negative emotion has yet to receive adequate attention from feminist philosophers: contempt. I argue that feminists should reconsider what role feelings of contempt for male oppressors and male-dominated institutions and practices should play in our lives. I begin by surveying four feminist defenses of the negative emotions. I then offer a brief sketch of the nature and (...)
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  37. The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices.Debra B. Bergoffen - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
  38. Addendum to “Rape as a Weapon of War”.Claudia Card - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):216-218.
  39. Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”.Lawrie Balfour - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
    In this essay, I contend that feminist theories of citizenship in the U.S. context must go beyond simply acknowledging the importance of race and grapple explicitly with the legacies of slavery. To sketch this case, I draw upon W.E.B. Du Bois's "The Damnation of Women," which explores the significance for all Americans of African American women's sexual, economic, and political lives under slavery and in its aftermath.
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  40. Renaturalizing the Body.Carol Bigwood - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (3):54-73.
    Some poststructuralist feminist theorists hold that the body is merely the product of cultural determinants and that gender is a free-floating artifice. I discuss how this "denaturalization" of gender and the body entrenches us yet deeper in the nature/culture dichotomy. The body, I maintain, needs to be "renaturalized" so that its earthy significance is recognized. Through a feminist reappropriation of Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of the body, I develop a noncausal linkage between gender and the body. I present the body as an (...)
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  41. Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction.Susan J. Brison - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
    In this article, Brison extends the analysis of freedom developed in Nancy J Hirschmann's book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, to an area of controversy among feminist theorists: that of sex work, including prostitution and participation in the production of pornography. This topic raises some of the same issues concerning choice and consent as the three topics Hirschmann discusses in her book-domestic violence, the current welfare system in the United States, and Islamic veiling-but it also (...)
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  42. Reading Woman: Displacing the Foundations of Femininity.Wendy A. Burns-Ardolino - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):42-59.
    I offer here an analysis of contemporary foundation garments while exploring the ways in which these garments encourage, reinforce and protect normative femininity. In examining the performatives of contemporary normative, ideal femininity as they perpetuate inhibited intentionality, ambiguous transcendence, and discontinuous unity, I look to the possibility for subversive performativity vis-à-vis the strengths of women in order to proliferate categories of gender and to potentially displace current notions of what it means to become woman.
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