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  1. Power and Limits of a Picture: On the Notion of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Literature.Wolfgang Huemer - forthcoming - In Falk Bornmüller, Mathis Lessau & Johannes Franzen (eds.), Literature as Thought Experiment? Paderborn: Fink.
  2. Only Imagine? Not Necessarily.Ruth Lorand - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayy032.
    In her recent book, Only Imagine, Kathleen Stock promotes extreme intentionalism with respect to fictional content.1 1 She writes, ‘the fictional content of a particular text is equivalent to exactly what the author of the text intended the reader to imagine’. There are at least three separate points here: the author’s intentions determine the fictional content; the fictional content is identical with the content of what the reader imagines; reading fiction necessarily entails imagining. The first two points are normative; they (...)
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  3. What is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. [REVIEW]Nick Wiltsher - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (272):654-657.
    Review of Harrison, "What is Fiction For?", and Miller, "Communities in Fiction".
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  4. Visualizing Narrative: Bridging the "Aesthetic Gap".Michael Benton - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 33 (2):33.
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  5. Vincent's Story: The Importance of Contextualism for Art Education.Anita Silvers - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (3):47.
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  6. Puzzles About Art.Marilyn G. Stewart - 1991 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 25 (2):109.
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  7. Frege on Dichtung and Elucidation.Gisela Bengtsson - 2018 - In Gisela Bengtsson, Simo Säätelä & Alois Pichler (eds.), New Essays on Frege: Between Science and Literature. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 101-119.
    In this paper, I identify an assumption at play in anti-semantic interpretative approaches to Frege: the notion that translatability to Frege’s concept script functions as a criterion for deciding whether a thought is expressed in a sentence or utterance. I question the viability of this assumption by pointing to Frege’s accounts of the aim and character of his logical language and scientific discourse more generally, and by looking at his remarks on poetic forms of language, literature and fiction (Dichtung). Since (...)
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  8. Mental Imagery and Fiction.Dustin Stokes - forthcoming - Canadian Journal of Philosophy:1-24.
    Fictions evoke imagery, and their value consists partly in that achievement. This paper offers analysis of this neglected topic. Section I identifies relevant philosophical background. II offers a working definition of imagery. III identifies empirical work on visual imagery. IV and V criticize imagery essentialism, through the lens of genuine fictional narratives. This outcome, though, is not wholly critical. The expressed spirit of imagery essentialism is to encourage philosophers to "put the image back into the imagination." The weakened conclusion is (...)
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  9. Time in Fiction.Robin le Poidevin - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):440-443.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThere have been many studies of the nature of fictional characters: whether and what sense, they are real, and how, if not real, there can be truths apparently about them. But, as the authors of this lively, original and provocative essay point out, the ontology of fiction is by no means exhausted by the characters (...)
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  10. ‘Call Me Ishmael’: Fiction and Direct Reference.Gerald Vision - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (4):369-378.
    Whereas it appears that direct, or causal, theories dominate philosophy’s theories of reference, and it is widely held that they present an insuperable obstacle for a fictional character’s name to refer, I attempt to show not only that they can be easily made compatible with such theories, but that reference to the fictional fits rather smoothly into the distinctive articles of current theories of direct reference. However, the issues about reference to fictional characters goes well beyond those points, so its (...)
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  11. 4.1. Fondamenti ontologici per una scienza dei servizi.Roberta Ferrario & Nicola Guarino - 2012 - Rivista di Estetica 49:227-246.
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  12. Fiction Cannot Be True.László Kajtár - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (9):2167-2186.
    According to the dominant theory of intentionalism, fiction and non-fiction are in a “mix-and-match” relationship with truth and falsity: both fiction and nonfiction can be either true or false. Intentionalists hold that fiction is a property of a narrative that is intended to elicit not belief but imagination or make-belief in virtue of the audience’s recognizing that such is the intention of the fiction-maker. They claim that in unlikely circumstances these fictions can turn out to be accidentally true. On the (...)
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  13. On Fictional Characters as Types.Enrico Terrone - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (2):161-176.
    Conceiving of fictional characters as types allows us to reconcile intuitions of sameness and difference about characters such as Batman that appear in different fictional worlds. Sameness occurs at the type level while difference occurs at the token level. Yet, the claim that fictional characters are types raises three main issues. Firstly, types seem to be eternal forms whereas fictional characters seem to be the outcome of a process of creation. Secondly, the tokens of a type are concrete particulars in (...)
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  14. On Making Sense of Ingarden.Barry Smith - 1979 - In Crisis of Aesthetics. Cracow: Jagiellonian University Press. pp. 283-289.
    An account of Roman Ingarden's ontology of literature.
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  15. SUKLA, ANANTA CH., Ed. Fiction and Art: Explorations in Contemporary Theory. New York: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, 416 Pp., $39.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Bradley Elicker - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):217-220.
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  16. The Puzzle of Factual Praise.John Holliday - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):169-179.
    It seems that we are not willing to give up the intuitions that works of fiction are free from the constraints of historical truth and historical inaccuracies sometimes count against the artistic value of works of fiction. Christopher Bartel calls this the puzzle of historical criticism. I argue that this puzzle extends beyond historical facts. While it is especially salient that historical accuracy at times appears relevant to the evaluation of fictional works, such relevance appears to be a feature of (...)
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  17. An Error Concerning Noses.Gregory Currie & Jerrold Levinson - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (1):9-13.
    We identify a strategy for getting beliefs from fiction via three assumptions: a certain causal generality holds in the fiction and does so because causal generalities in fiction are carried over from what the author takes to be fact; the author is reliable on this topic, so what the author takes to be fact is fact. We do not question. While will, in particular cases, be doubtful, the strategy is vulnerable more generally to the worry that what looks like a (...)
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  18. The Real Foundation of Fictional Worlds.Stacie Friend - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (1):29-42.
    I argue that judgments of what is ‘true in a fiction’ presuppose the Reality Assumption: the assumption that everything that is true is fictionally the case, unless excluded by the work. By contrast with the more familiar Reality Principle, the Reality Assumption is not a rule for inferring implied content from what is explicit. Instead, it provides an array of real-world truths that can be used in such inferences. I claim that the Reality Assumption is essential to our ability to (...)
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  19. What is Fiction For? [REVIEW]Karen Simecek - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (4):424-427.
    What is Fiction For?HarrisonBernardindiana university press. 2014. pp. 620. £23.99.
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  20. Possible Worlds Between The Disciplines.Ruth Ronen - 1993 - British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):29-40.
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  21. Resolving the Paradox of Fiction.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2014 - Stance 7:41-50.
    In this paper, I examine the Paradox of Fiction: in order for us to have genuine and rational emotional responses to a character or situation, we must believe that the character or situation is not purely fictional, we believe that fictional characters and situations are purely fictional, and we have genuine and rational emotional responses to fictional characters and situations. After defending and against formidable objections and considering the plausibility of ~ in isolation of and, I conclude that we should (...)
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  22. Only Imagine: Fiction, Interpretation and Imagination.Kathleen Stock - 2017 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In the first half of this book, I offer a theory of fictional content or, as it is sometimes known, ‘fictional truth’.The theory of fictional content I argue for is ‘extreme intentionalism’. The basic idea – very roughly, in ways which are made precise in the book - is that the fictional content of a particular text is equivalent to exactly what the author of the text intended the reader to imagine. The second half of the book is concerned with (...)
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  23. Commentary and Xiaoshuo FictionTraditional Chinese Fiction and Fiction Commentary: Reading and Writing Between the Lines.Timothy C. Wong & David L. Rolston - 2000 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 120 (3):400.
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  24. The Language of Fiction in the Works of Yusuf Idris.Pierre Cachia & Sasson Somekh - 1986 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 106 (2):384.
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  25. Sympathy and Fascination.Katherine Tullmann - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):115-129.
    Why do we form strong emotional attachments to unlikeable and immoral characters during our engagements with fictions? These pro-attitudes persist even as we realize that we would loathe these people if we were to encounter them in real-life. In this paper, I explore the implications of the sympathy for the devil phenomenon. I begin by considering several popular explanations, including simulation, aesthetic distancing, pre-focusing, and the ‘best of all characters’. I conclude that each one is inadequate. I then propose my (...)
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  26. The Trouble with Poetic Licence.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):149-161.
    It is commonly thought that authors can make anything whatsoever true in their fictions by artistic fiat. Harry Deutsch originally called this position the Principle of Poetic License. If true, PPL sets an important constraint on accounts of fictional truth: they must be such as to allow that, for any x, one can write a story in which it is true that x. I argue that PPL is far too strong: it requires us to abandon the law of non-contradiction and (...)
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  27. How Fictional Worlds Are Created.Deena Skolnick Weisberg - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (8):462-470.
    Both adults and children have the ability to not only think about reality but also use their imaginations and create fictional worlds. This article describes the process by which world creation happens, drawing from philosophical and psychological treatments of this issue. First, world creators recognize the need to create a fictional world, as when starting a pretend game or opening a novel. Then, creators merge some real-world knowledge with the premises of the fictional world to construct a fuller representation, though (...)
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  28. Brock, Stuart and Anthony Everett, Eds. Fictional Objects. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015, 299 Pp., $75.00 Cloth. [REVIEW]Luke Manning - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):318-321.
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  29. Logical Fictions in Medieval Literature and Philosophy.Virginie Greene - 2014 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, new ways of storytelling and inventing fictions appeared in the French-speaking areas of Europe. This new art still influences our global culture of fiction. Virginie Greene explores the relationship between fiction and the development of neo-Aristotelian logic during this period through a close examination of seminal literary and philosophical texts by major medieval authors, such as Anselm of Canterbury, Abélard, and Chrétien de Troyes. This study of Old French logical fictions encourages a broader theoretical (...)
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  30. The Nature of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    This important book provides a theory about the nature of fiction, and about the relation between the author, the reader and the fictional text. The approach is philosophical: that is to say, the author offers an account of key concepts such as fictional truth, fictional characters, and fiction itself. The book argues that the concept of fiction can be explained partly in terms of communicative intentions, partly in terms of a condition which excludes relations of counterfactual dependence between the world (...)
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  31. La loi lru ou la fiction de l'autonomie.Paolo Tortonese - 2012 - Cités 50 (2):107.
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  32. Against a Perpetuating Fiction: Disentangling Art From Hyperreality.Garen J. Torikian - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 44 (2):100.
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  33. The Deleuzian Critique of Pure Fiction.Gregg Lambert - 1997 - Substance 26 (3):128.
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  34. Of Words and the World: Referential Anxiety in Contemporary French Fiction.David Herman & David R. Ellison - 1995 - Substance 24 (1/2):192.
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  35. Michel Tournier's Metaphysical Fictions.Christopher Anderson & Susan Petit - 1993 - Substance 22 (2/3):364.
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  36. What's the Story?Paisley Nathan Livingston - 1993 - Substance 22 (2/3):98.
    People often ask each other “what happens” in a novel or film, and they are inclined to think that some answers are better than others. Some claims about what happens in a story are deemed inaccurate or false, while others are the object of a fairly widespread consensus. The fact that a statement about a narrative discourse is deemed accurate does not mean that it will or should be accepted as an adequate statement about the story told in the discourse. (...)
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  37. Fiction Is Contagious.Anthony Wall - 1993 - Substance 22 (2/3):251.
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  38. The Subversive Scribe: Translating LatinAmerican Fiction.Earl E. Fitz & Suzanne Jill Levine - 1992 - Substance 21 (3):136.
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  39. Fictional Genders, Role and Representation in Nineteenth-Century French Narrative.Marie-Pierre Le Hir & Dorothy Kelly - 1990 - Substance 19 (2/3):194.
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  40. What Does Fiction Know?Michel Pierssens - 1988 - Substance 17 (1):3.
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  41. Representation in Contemporary French Fiction.Maria Minich Brewer & Dina Sherzer - 1987 - Substance 16 (3):99.
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  42. The Necessity of Fiction.Eric Gans - 1986 - Substance 15 (2):36.
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  43. The Subject in Question: The Languages of Theory and the Strategies of Fiction.Dina Sherzer & David Carroll - 1984 - Substance 13 (2):80.
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  44. The Narrative Act: Point of View in Prose Fiction.Gary Lee Stonum & Susan Sniader Lanser - 1982 - Substance 11 (3):87.
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  45. Picaros, Madmen, Naifs, and Clowns: The Unreliable First-Person Narrator.Rob Nixon & Riggan William - 1982 - Substance 11 (3):88.
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  46. Zeno: His Fictions and His Problems.Mark Meyer - 1972 - Substance 1 (3):121.
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  47. Family and Fiction.Catherine Backes-Clement & J. Dickson - 1972 - Substance 1 (3):15.
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  48. A Sort of Fiction?Ian Gregor - 1972 - New Blackfriars 53 (622):120-124.
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  49. The Form of His Fiction.Tery Eagleton - 1974 - New Blackfriars 55 (653):477-481.
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  50. A Sort of Fiction?Tan Gregor - 1941 - New Blackfriars 22 (252):120-124.
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