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  1. The Pleasures of the Table.Julian Baggini - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 65:68-74.
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  2. Food and Everyday Life.Thomas Conroy & Talia Welsh (eds.) - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Acknowledgments. The seed of this book began with a session on “food and everyday life” which took place at the 2010 Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy con- ference in Montreal, Canada. I thus wish to acknowledge and ...
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  3. Food, Morals And Meaning, Second Edition: The Pleasure And Anxiety Of Eating. [REVIEW]John Coveney - 2007 - Foucault Studies:197-200.
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  4. Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food.Deane W. Curtin & Lisa M. Heldke (eds.) - 1992 - Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy has often been criticized for privileging the abstract; this volume attempts to remedy that situation. Focusing on one of the most concrete of human concerns, food, the editors argue for the existence of a philosophy of food.
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  5. The Book of Sent Soví: Medieval Recipes From Catalonia. [REVIEW]Paul Freedman - 2009 - The Medieval Review 5.
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  6. Carnal Appetites: FoodSexIdentities (Review).Lisa M. Heldke - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (3):240-242.
  7. In but Not of, of but Not In: On Taste, Hipness, and White Embodiment.Robin James - 2009 - Contemporary Aesthetics.
    The status of the body figures paradoxically in the interrelated discourses of whiteness, aesthetic taste, and hipness. While Richard Dyer’s analysis of whiteness argues that white identity is “in but not of the body,” Carolyn Korsmeyer’s and Julia Kristeva’s feminist analyses of aesthetic “taste” demonstrate that this faculty is traditionally conceived as something “of” but not “in” the body. While taste directly distances whiteness from embodiment, hipness negatively affirms this same distance: the hipster proves his elite status within white culture (...)
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  8. On Disgust.Aurel Kolnai, Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2004 - Open Court.
    The problem of disgust has until recently been neglected in the scientific literature. In comparison to the scientific (psychological and metaphysical) interest that has been applied to hatred, anxiety, and similar phenomena, disgust — although a common and important factor in our emotional life — has been unexplored, or it has been viewed as a “higher degree of dislike,” as “nausea,” or as a phenomenon of the “repression of urges.” We here show how the feeling of disgust possesses a unique (...)
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  9. Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2011 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Disgust is among the strongest of aversions, characterized by involuntary physical recoil and even nausea. Yet paradoxically, disgusting objects can sometimes exert a grisly allure, and this emotion can constitute a positive, appreciative aesthetic response when exploited by works of art -- a phenomenon labelled here "aesthetic disgust." While the reactive, visceral quality of disgust contributes to its misleading reputation as a relatively "primitive" response mechanism, it is this feature that also gives it a particular aesthetic power when manifest in (...)
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  10. Disputing Taste.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 45:70-76.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  11. Delightful, Delicious, Disgusting.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):217–225.
  12. Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy.Carolyn Korsmeyer - 1999 - Cornell University Press.
  13. Visceral Values: Aurel Kolnai on Disgust.Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith - 2004 - In Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.), Aurel Kolnai's On Disgust. Open Court Publishing Company. pp. 1-23.
    In 1929 when Aurel Kolnai published his essay “On Disgust” in Husserl's ]ahrbuch he could truly assert that disgust was a "sorely neglected" topic. Now, however, this situation is changing as philosophers, psychologists, and historians of culture are turning their attention not only to emotions in general but more specifically to the large and disturbing set of aversive emotions, including disgust. We here provide an account of Kolnai’s contribution to the study of the phenomenon of disgust, of his general theory (...)
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  14. Morality and Aesthetics of Food.Shen-yi Liao & Aaron Meskin - 2018 - In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Food Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 658-679.
    This chapter explores the interaction between the moral value and aesthetic value of food, in part by connecting it to existing discussions of the interaction between moral and aesthetic values of art. Along the way, this chapter considers food as art, the aesthetic value of food, and the role of expertise in uncovering aesthetic value. Ultimately this chapter argues against both food autonomism (the view that food's moral value is unconnected to its aesthetic value) and Carolyn Korsmeyer's food moralism (the (...)
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  15. The Art of Food.Aaron Meskin - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):81-86.
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  16. Experimental Philosophical Aesthetics as Public Philosophy.Aaron Meskin & Shen-yi Liao - forthcoming - In Sébastien Réhault & Florian Cova (eds.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Aesthetics. New York: Bloomsbury.
    Experimental philosophy offers an alternative mode of engagement for public philosophy, in which the public can play a participatory role. We organized two public events on the aesthetics of coffee that explored this alternative mode of engagement. The first event focuses on issues surrounding the communication of taste. The second event focuses on issues concerning ethical influences on taste. -/- In this paper, we report back on these two events which explored the possibility of doing experimental philosophical aesthetics as public (...)
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  17. Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry.Dave Monroe & Fritz Allhoff (eds.) - 2007 - Blackwell.
    Food & Philosophy offers a collection of essays which explore a range of philosophical topics related to food; it joins Wine & Philosophy and Beer & Philosophy in in the "Epicurean Trilogy." Essays are organized thematically and written by philosophers, food writers, and professional chefs.
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  18. Food Landscapes: An Object-Centered Model of Food Appreciation.Matteo Ravasio - 2018 - The Monist 101 (3):309-323.
    In this paper I claim that Allen Carlson’s object-centered model for the aesthetic appreciation of nature could be extended to food. The application of an object-centered model to food requires the identification of appropriate foci of appreciative attention. I claim that knowledge about food function and history is relevant to its appreciation, as is the interplay between the resources of a territory and the way in which these are used by its inhabitants. After having offered a brief application of the (...)
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  19. Food for Thought: Philosophy and Food.Elizabeth Telfer - 1996 - Routledge.
    The importance of food in our individual lives raises moral questions from the debate over eating animals to the prominence of gourmet cookery in the popular media. Through philosophy, Elizabeth Telfer discusses issues including our obligations to those who are starving; the value of the pleasure of food; food as art; our duties to animals; and the moral virtues of hospitableness and temperance. Elizabeth Telfer shows how much traditional philosophy, from Plato to John Stuart Mill, has to say to illuminate (...)
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  20. Le plaisir de manger du chocolat.Fabrice Teroni - 2014 - In Olivier Massin & Anne Meylan (eds.), Aristote chez les Helvètes: Onze essais de métaphysique helvétique. Ithaque.
    A l’instar de bien d’autres activités, manger du chocolat suscite du plaisir. Mais comment articuler de manière satisfaisante les différents sens en jeu dans l’ingestion d’un aliment – le goût, bien sûr, mais aussi l’odorat, l’ouïe et le toucher – avec ce plaisir ? Selon une approche traditionnelle, ce dernier n’est rien de plus qu’une expérience ineffable qui, si elle s’avère accompagner certaines stimulations sensorielles ou des activités plus intellectuelles, ne porte sur rien du tout. Est-ce plausible ? Ou faudrait-il (...)
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  21. Taste and Food in Rousseau's Julie, or the New Heloise. Wertz - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (3):24-35.
    What are the historical origins of aesthetic education? One of these comes from the eighteenth century. This became an important theme in a novel of the time. Published in 1761, Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s Julie, or the New Heloise: Letters of Two Lovers Who Live in a Small Town at the Foot of the Alps1 was an instant success in eighteenth-century Europe. Widely read, the novel made European culture self-conscious and forced it to pay attention to aspects of living that had gone (...)
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