Food Ethics

Edited by Andrea Borghini (Università degli Studi di Milano, Università degli Studi di Milano)
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  1. Why Should We Address the Climate Crisis?Derek R. Brookes - manuscript
    As a species, we have a firmly embedded attachment to seeing ourselves as ‘apart from’ and ‘superior to’ the natural world. This can prevent us from seeing any intrinsic value in other animals, plant life, rivers, the ocean, the soil, entire ecosystems, and so on. It gives us ‘permission’ to see them instead as being of value only insofar as they serve our interests and goals. This perspective cannot help but affect our motivation to address the climate crisis. If we (...)
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  2. The New Three-Legged Stool: Agroecology, Food Sovereignty, and Food Justice.M. Jahi Chappell & Mindi Schneider - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 419--429.
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  3. Participative Inequalities and Food Justice.Clement Loo - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 430--440.
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  4. Food Security and Ethics.Marko Ahteensuu & Helena Siipi - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 409--418.
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  5. Ethics of Food Waste.Miranda Mirosa, David Pearson & Rory Pearson - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 400--408.
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  6. Responsibility for Hunger in Liberal Democracies.David Reynolds & Miranda Mirosa - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 388--399.
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  7. Case Studies of Food Sovereignty Initiatives Among the Māori of Aotearoa.Karyn Stein, Miranda Mirosa, Lynette Carter & Marion Johnson - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 366--376.
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  8. Individual and Community Identity in Food Sovereignty: The Possibilities and Pitfalls of Translating a Rural Social Movement.Ian Werkheiser - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 377--387.
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  9. Labor and Local Food: Farmworkers on Smaller Farms.Margaret Gray - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 344--353.
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  10. Seafood Ethics: The Normative Trials of Neptune’s Treasure.Craig K. Harris - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 315--327.
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  11. Saving a Dynamic System: Sustainable Adaptation and the Balinese Subak.Thomas Hilde, Regan C., R. G. Matthew & Wiwik Dharmiasih - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 331--343.
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  12. Ritual Slaughtering Vs. Animal Welfare: A Utilitarian Example of (Moral) Conflict Management.Francesco Ferraro - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 305--314.
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  13. Veganism Without Animal Rights.Gary L. Francione & Anna Charlton - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 294--304.
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  14. Food, Welfare, and Agriculture: A Complex Picture.Simon Jenkins - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 274--283.
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  15. Animal Welfare.David Fraser - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 264--273.
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  16. The Ethics of Humane Animal Agriculture.James McWilliams - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 243--252.
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  17. Confinement Agriculture From a Moral Perspective: The Pew Commission Report.Bernard E. Rollin - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 253--263.
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  18. Food and Environmental Justice.Graeme Sherriff - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 230--239.
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  19. Ethical Consumerism: A Defense.Sabine Hohl - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 188--197.
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  20. Biodiversity and Development.John Vandermeer - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 211--218.
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  21. The Governance of Food: Institutions and Policies.Michiel Korthals - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 158--166.
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  22. Obesity and Coercion.Clement Loo & Robert A. Skipper - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 178--187.
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  23. Food at the Nexus of Bioethics and Biopolitics.Christopher Mayes - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 167--177.
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  24. Food Labeling and Free Speech.Matteo Bonotti - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 127--137.
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  25. Food Ethics in an Intergenerational Perspective.Michele Loi - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 138--147.
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  26. Health Labeling.Morton Ebbe Juul Nielsen - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 148--157.
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  27. Indigenous Peoples, Food, and the Environment in Northeast India.Sandra Albert - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 113--123.
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  28. Food Security at Risk: A Matter of Dignity and Self-Respect.Elena Irrera - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 103--112.
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  29. The Challenges of Dietary Pluralism.Emanuela Ceva, Chiara Testino & Federico Zuolo - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 93--102.
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  30. Understanding Anorexia at the Crossroads of Phenomenology and Feminism.Corine Pelluchon - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 82--90.
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  31. Meat and the Crisis of Masculinity.Thomas E. Randall - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 72--81.
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  32. Food and Technology.David M. Kaplan - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 38--47.
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  33. Women’s Work: Ethics, Home Cooking, and the Sexual Politics of Food.Mary C. Rawlinson - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 61--71.
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  34. Metaphoric Determinants of Food and Identity.Kendall J. Eskine - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 27--37.
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  35. Interactions Between Self, Embodied Identities, and Food: Considering Race, Class, and Gender.Lisa Jean Moore & Kayla Del Biondo - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 16--26.
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  36. What is Food? Networks, Not Commodities.Ileana F. Szymanski - 2017 - In Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Food Ethics. Routledge. pp. 7--15.
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  37. Why Buy Local?Benjamin Ferguson & Christopher Thompson - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (1):104-120.
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  38. Organic Agriculture.Andrzej Klimczuk & Magdalena Klimczuk-Kochańska - 2020 - In Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa & Péter Marton (eds.), The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies. Springer Verlag. pp. 1--7.
    Consumers are increasingly aware of the health- and safety-related implications of the food which they can buy in the market. At the same time, households have become more aware of their environmental responsibilities. Regarding the production of food, a crucial and multifunctional role is played by agriculture. The way vegetables, fruits, and other crops are grown and how livestock is raised has an impact on the environment and landscape. Operations performed by farmers, such as water management, can be dangerous for (...)
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  39. The Freegan Challenge to Veganism.Josh Milburn & Bob Fischer - forthcoming - In Ethical Diets and Animal Ethics — Beyond Extensionism.
    There is a surprising consensus, even among those who argue for veganism, that freeganism is permissible — that is, it’s permissible to eat animal-based foods that would otherwise go to waste. What’s more, Donald Bruckner has recently argued that vegans should be freegans. In this paper, we explore what the strict vegan can say by way of response. We offer a novel challenge to freeganism by drawing upon Sue Donaldson and Will Kymlicka’s ‘zoopolitical’ conception of animal rights, which supports, we (...)
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  40. In Defence of Backyard Chickens.Bob Fischer & Josh Milburn - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (1):108-123.
    Suppose that animals have rights. If so, may you go down to your local farm store, buy some chicks, raise them in your backyard, and eat their eggs? You wouldn't think so. But we argue, to the contrary, that you may. Just as there are circumstances in which it's permissible to liberate a slave, even if that means paying into a corrupt system, so there are circumstances in which it's permissible to liberate chickens by buying them. Moreover, we contend that (...)
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  41. The Ethics of Eating Animals: Usually Bad, Sometimes Wrong, Often Permissible.Bob Fischer - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    Intensive animal agriculture wrongs many, many animals. Philosophers have argued, on this basis, that most people in wealthy Western contexts are morally obligated to avoid animal products. This book explains why the author thinks that’s mistaken. He reaches this negative conclusion by contending that the major arguments for veganism fail: they don’t establish the right sort of connection between producing and eating animal-based foods. Moreover, if they didn’t have this problem, then they would have other ones: we wouldn’t be obliged (...)
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  42. How to Help When It Hurts: ACT Individually (and in Groups).C. E. Abbate - 2020 - Animal Studies Journal 9 (1):170-200.
    In a recent article, Corey Wrenn argues that in order to adequately address injustices done to animals, we ought to think systemically. Her argument stems from a critique of the individualist approach I employ to resolve a moral dilemma faced by animal sanctuaries, who sometimes must harm some animals to help others. But must systemic critiques of injustice be at odds with individualist approaches? In this paper, I respond to Wrenn by showing how individualist approaches that take seriously the notion (...)
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  43. Meat Eating and Moral Responsibility: Exploring the Moral Distinctions Between Meat Eaters and Puppy Torturers.C. E. Abbate - 2020 - Utilitas 32 (4):398-415.
    In his influential article on the ethics of eating animals, Alastair Norcross argues that consumers of factory raised meat and puppy torturers are equally condemnable because both knowingly cause serious harm to sentient creatures just for trivial pleasures. Against this claim, I argue that those who buy and consume factory raised meat, even those who do so knowing that they cause harm, have a partial excuse for their wrongdoings. Meat eaters act under social duress, which causes volitional impairment, and they (...)
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  44. Review of Food, Animals, and the Environment: An Ethical Approach, by Christopher Schlottmann and Jeff Sebo. [REVIEW]Trevor Hedberg - 2020 - Essays in Philosophy 21 (1):120-123.
    This empirically rigorous textbook serves as an introduction to food ethics and an overview of the major issues currently discussed in this emerging subfield of environmental ethics. While the book may be too dense in places for introductory-level undergraduates, it is nonetheless a welcome addition to the scholarship in this area, since textbooks focusing specifically on food ethics remain relatively rare.
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  45. Valuing Animals as They Are—Whether They Feel It or Not.C. E. Abbate - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 28 (3):770-788.
    Dressing up animals in ridiculous costumes, shaming dogs on the internet, playing Big Buck Hunter at the local tavern, feeding vegan food to cats, and producing and consuming “knockout” animals, what, if anything, do these acts have in common? In this article, I develop two respect-based arguments that explain how these acts are morally problematic, even though they might not always, if ever, affect the experiential welfare of animals. While these acts are not ordinary wrongs, they are animal dignitary wrongs.
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  46. Veganism, (Almost) Harm-Free Animal Flesh, and Nonmaleficence: Navigating Dietary Ethics in an Unjust World.C. E. Abbate - 2019 - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Animal Ethics.
    This is a chapter written for an audience that is not intimately familiar with the philosophy of animal consumption. It provides an overview of the harms that animals, the environment, and humans endure as a result of industrial animal agriculture, and it concludes with a defense of ostroveganism and a tentative defense of cultured meat.
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  47. Food and the Association of Perceptions.S. K. Wertz - 2019 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):295-304.
    It has long been claimed and supposedly substantiated that there exists an association of ideas, but not of perceptions. Collingwood echoed this claim from Hume, but Hume later in the Treatise produced an association of impressions, so he came close to Hobbes’s position: human physiology has “trains of sense” and these are carried on in human thought—what we call “ideas”. A strong case can be made for this claim when we examine the phenomenon of food. Concerning food, I explore Chinese (...)
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  48. Investigating the Elasticity of Meat Consumption for Climate Mitigation: 4Rs for Responsible Meat Use.Sophia Efstathiou - 2019 - In Eija Vinnari & Markus Vinnari (eds.), Sustainable Governance and Management of Food Systems: Ethical Perspectives. Wageningen, Netherlands: pp. 19-25.
    Our main research question is how pliable Norwegian meat consumption practices are. However it is not any type of elasticity we are interested in. We are specifically interested in the scope for what we dub the “4Rs” of responsible meat consumption within existing food systems: 1. Reducing the amount of animal-based proteins used 2. Replacing animal-based protein with plant-based, or insect-based alternatives 3. Refining processes of utilization of animal-based protein to minimize emissions, loss and waste 4. Recognising animal-based protein as (...)
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  49. Food, Animals, and the Environment: An Ethical Approach; By Christopher Schlottmann and Jeff Sebo. [REVIEW]Kyle Johannsen - 2019 - Philosophy in Review 39 (4):206-8.
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  50. Food Waste: Addressing Our 160 Billion Pound Public Health Challenge with Policy and Business Interventions.Mathew Swinburne & Katie Sandson - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (S2):100-103.
    The United States wastes approximately 40% of its food supply. This article will examine the implications of this waste for food insecurity and climate change. It will also explore how the law and social entrepreneurship can be used to confront this public health challenge.
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