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  1. Dag Aasland (forthcoming). Towards a Re-Interpretation of Business: A Levinasian Approach to Ethics in Business. Levinas, Business Ethics.
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  2. Gabriel Abend (2013). The Origins of Business Ethics in American Universities, 1902-1936. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (2):171-205.
    The history of the field of business ethics in the U.S. remains understudied and misunderstood. In this article I begin to remedy this oversight about the past, and I suggest how it can be beneficial in the present. Using both published and unpublished primary sources, I argue that the business ethics field emerged in the early twentieth century, against the backdrop of the establishment of business schools in major universities. I bring to light four important developments: business ethics lectures at (...)
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  3. Accountability (2005). A Standard For Stakeholder Engagement. Philosophy for Business 22.
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  4. Alma Acevedo (2001). Of Fallacies and Curricula: A Case of Business Ethics. Teaching Business Ethics 5 (2):157-170.
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  5. James Agarwal & David Cruise Malloy (2000). The Role of Existentialism in Ethical Business Decision‐Making. Business Ethics: A European Review 9 (3):143-154.
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  6. Murat Akpinar & Zsuzsanna Vincze (2008). A Theory of Primary Stakeholder Contributions in Resolving Threats of Market Integration in the European Union. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:483-494.
    The review of literature on stakeholders reveals that there is need to understand more about firm-stakeholder relationships especially from stakeholders’ point of view. Market integration in the European Union (EU) provides an excellent context for increasing such understanding since it is creating opportunities and threats for firms and their stakeholders. This research aims to make a contribution in this direction by analyzing strategic responses of primary stakeholders to selected threat events in the history of Volkswagen (VW) since 1960.
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  7. Mohammad A. Ali (forthcoming). Stakeholder Salience for Stakeholder Firms: An Attempt to Reframe an Important Heuristic Device. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  8. Jörg Andriol (2000). Managing Social Risk Through Stakeholder Partnership Building. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 11:341-360.
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  9. Daniel Arenas, Josep M. Lozano & Laura Albareda (2007). Behind CSR. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:419-424.
    This paper argues for the existence of two levels of stakeholder dialogue: a micro and a macro level. The first is the one companies have with their own stakeholder groups, the second is a broader social debate among different agents about the role of business in society. The paper argues why the macro level matters for CSR and why it can be called a dialogue. It also underlines the importance of mutual perceptions in the macro-dialogue. For this purpose we present (...)
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  10. Joseph L. Badaracco (1997). The Internet, Intel and the Vigilante Stakeholder. Business Ethics: A European Review 6 (1):18-29.
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  11. Joseph L. BadaraccoJr (1997). The Internet, Intel and the Vigilante Stakeholder. Business Ethics 6 (1):18–29.
  12. M. Bandsuch & R. Winsor (2005). The URJCO Model of Stakeholder Management: A Practical Approach to Business Ethics. In Sheb L. True, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (eds.), Fulfilling Our Obligation: Perspectives on Teaching Business Ethics. Kennesaw State University.
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  13. Barbara R. Bartkus & Myron Glassman (2008). Do Firms Practice What They Preach? The Relationship Between Mission Statements and Stakeholder Management. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (2):207-216.
    The accuracy of corporate mission statements has not been well explored. In this study, the authors investigate the relationship between mission statement content and stakeholder management actions. Findings indicate that although social issues such as the environment and diversity are less frequently included, their mention in mission statements is significantly associated with behaviors regarding these issues. The study found no relationship between firms with mission statements that mention specific stakeholder groups (employees, customers, and community) and behaviors regarding these stakeholders. This (...)
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  14. Stephanie Bertels & Harrie Vredenburg (2005). Who Sits at the Table? A New Approach to Stakeholder Selection. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:293-297.
    When assembling a collaborative initiative, how do you select the appropriate stakeholders to promote collaborative success? We examine the limitations of thestakeholder theory approach to resolving this issue. Instead, we argue that the domain-based perspective and the notion of requisite variety both offer worthwhile perspectives on the issue of participant selection. Combining these perspectives, we pave the way for a theory of participant selection that focuses on evaluating collaborative resources and capabilities at the individual, organizational and domain levels.
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  15. Kelly D. Martin Beverly Kracher (2009). A Moral Evaluation of Online Business Protest Tactics and Implications for Stakeholder Management. Business and Society Review 114 (1):59-83.
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  16. Olivier Boiral & Iñaki Heras-Saizarbitoria (forthcoming). Managing Biodiversity Through Stakeholder Involvement: Why, Who, and for What Initiatives? Journal of Business Ethics.
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  17. Norman E. Bowie (2012). Book Reviews-Stakeholder Theory: The State of the Art, by R. Edward Freeman Et Al. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):179.
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  18. Norman E. Bowie (2012). Stakeholder Theory. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (1):179-185.
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  19. Steven N. Brenner (1993). The Stakeholder Theory of the Firm and Organizational Decision Making. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 4:405-416.
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  20. Steven N. Brenner, Michael E. Johnson-Cramer, John F. Mahon, Tim Rowley & Donna J. Wood (2005). Symposium. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:298-301.
    This panel considered the uses of and prospects for the stakeholder theory/approach. After 20 years of popularity, the stakeholder concept has still notemerged as a true theory. However, it offers some unique perspectives on business organizations and there is plenty of room to develop stakeholder theory and research. These session notes are offered to further the scholarly discussion.
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  21. Eric Brown (2013). Vulnerability and the Basis of Business Ethics: From Fiduciary Duties to Professionalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):489-504.
    This paper examines the role of vulnerability in the basis of business ethics by criticizing its role in giving a moral substantial character to fiduciary duties to shareholders. The target is Marcoux’s (Bus Ethics Q 13(1):1–24, 2003) argument for morally substantial fiduciary duties vis-à-vis the multifiduciary stakeholder theory. Rather than proceed to support the stakeholder paradigm, a conception of vulnerability is combined with Heath’s 2004) “market failure” view of the ethical obligations of managers as falling out of their roles as (...)
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  22. Jill A. Brown, Ann K. Buchholtz & Paul Dunn (2016). Moral Salience and the Role of Goodwill in Firm-Stakeholder Trust Repair. Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (2):181-199.
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  23. Anthony F. Buono (2003). A Review of Redefining the Corporation: Stakeholder Management and Organizational Wealth. [REVIEW] Business and Society Review 108 (2):279-284.
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  24. Jon Burchell & Joanne Cook (2013). Sleeping with the Enemy? Strategic Transformations in Business–NGO Relationships Through Stakeholder Dialogue. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (3):505-518.
    Campaigning activities of non-governmental organisations (NGOs) have increased public awareness and concern regarding the alleged unethical and environmentally damaging practices of many major multinational companies. Companies have responded by developing corporate social responsibility strategies to demonstrate their commitment to both the societies within which they function and to the protection of the natural environment. This has often involved a move towards greater transparency in company practice and a desire to engage with stakeholders, often including many of the campaign organisations that (...)
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  25. Harry J. Van Buren (2001). If Fairness Is the Problem, Is Consent the Solution? Integrating ISCT and Stakeholder Theory. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (3):481.
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  26. Kenneth D. Butterfield, Richard Reed & David J. Lemak (2004). An Inductive Model of Collaboration From the Stakeholder's Perspective. Business and Society 43 (2):162-195.
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  27. Jerry M. Calton (1992). What is at Stake in the Stakeholder Model? Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 3:410-429.
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  28. John Ehsman Cantrell, Elias Kyriazis & Gary Noble (2015). Developing CSR Giving as a Dynamic Capability for Salient Stakeholder Management. Journal of Business Ethics 130 (2):403-421.
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  29. Archie B. Carroll & Juha Näsi (1997). Understanding Stakeholder Thinking: Themes From a Finnish Conference. Business Ethics 6 (1):46–51.
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  30. Archie B. Carroll & Juha Nasi (1997). Understanding Stakeholder Thinking: Themes From a Finnish Conference. Business Ethics: A European Review 6 (1):46-51.
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  31. Thomas L. Carson (2005). The Morality of Bluffing: A Reply to Allhoff. Journal of Business Ethics 56 (4):399-403.
    In a recent paper that appeared in this journal Fritz Allhoff addresses the morality of bluffing in negotiations1. He focuses on cases in which people misstate their reservation price in negotiations, e.g., suppose that I am selling a house and tell a prospective buyer that $300,000 is absolutely the lowest price that I will accept, when I know that I would be willing to accept as little as $270,000 for the house rather than continue to try to sell it. Allhoff (...)
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  32. Carmelo Cennamo, Pascual Berrone & Luis R. Gomez-Mejia (2009). Does Stakeholder Management Have a Dark Side? Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):491-507.
    This article is a first attempt to line out the conditions under which executives might have a real self-interest in pursuing a broad stakeholder management (SM) orientation to enlarge their power. We suggest that managers have wider latitude of action under an SM approach, even when this is instrumental to financial performance. The causally ambiguity of the performance effects of idiosyncratic relationships with stakeholders not only makes SM strategy difficult for competitors to imitate but also increases managerial discretion. When managers (...)
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  33. Jennifer C. Chen & Robin W. Roberts (2010). Toward a More Coherent Understanding of the Organization–Society Relationship: A Theoretical Consideration for Social and Environmental Accounting Research. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (4):651-665.
    In this study we analyze the overlapping perspectives of legitimacy theory, institutional theory, resource dependence theory, and stakeholder theory. Our purpose is to explore how these theories can inform and be built upon by one another. Through our analysis we provide a broader theoretical understanding of these theories that may support and promote social and environmental accounting research. This article starts with a detailed analysis of legitimacy theory by bringing some recent critical discussions on legitimacy and corporations in the management (...)
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  34. Max B. E. Clarkson (1995). The Management of Stakeholder Relationships in Totalitarian and Democratic Societies. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 6:427-438.
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  35. Don Clifton & Azlan Amran (2011). The Stakeholder Approach: A Sustainability Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):121-136.
    This article considers the stakeholder approach (SHA) to organisational management through the lens of what it means for humans to live sustainably on the Earth (that is, for there to be a sustainable world). In particular, the article considers if the SHA, as it is presented in mainstream academic and management literature, is supportive of corporate practices that advance the achievement of a sustainable world. The analysis shows the SHA to have significant failings in this regard when viewed against key (...)
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  36. James J. Cordeiro & Manish Tewari (2015). Firm Characteristics, Industry Context, and Investor Reactions to Environmental CSR: A Stakeholder Theory Approach. Journal of Business Ethics 130 (4):833-849.
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  37. Elisabet Garriga Cots (2011). Stakeholder Social Capital: A New Approach to Stakeholder Theory. Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (4):328-341.
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  38. Andrew Crane, Ciaran Driver, John Kaler, Martin Parker & John Parkinson (2005). Stakeholder Democracy: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary View. Business Ethics 14 (1):67–75.
  39. Andrew Crane, Ciaran Driver, John Kaler, Martin Parker & John Parkinson (2005). Stakeholder Democracy: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary View. Business Ethics: A European Review 14 (1):67-75.
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  40. Andrew Crane, Dirk Matten & Jeremy Moon (2004). Stakeholders as Citizens? Rethinking Rights, Participation, and Democracy. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):107-122.
    This paper reviews and analyses the implications of citizenship thinking for building ethical institutional arrangements for business. The paper looks at various stakeholder groups whose relation with the company changes quite significantly when one starts to conceptualize it in terms of citizenship. Rather than being simply stakeholders, we could see those groups either as citizens, or as other constituencies participating in the administration of citizenship for others, or in societal governance more broadly. This raises crucial questions about accountability and democracy (...)
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  41. Andrew Crane & Trish Ruebottom (2011). Stakeholder Theory and Social Identity: Rethinking Stakeholder Identification. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):77-87.
    In this article, we propose an adaption to stakeholder theory whereby stakeholders are conceptualized on the basis of their social identity. We begin by offering a critical review of both traditional and more recent developments in stakeholder theory, focusing in particular on the way in which stakeholder categories are identified. By identifying critical weaknesses in the existing approach, as well as important points of strength, we outline an alternative approach that refines our understanding of stakeholders in important ways. To do (...)
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  42. Donal Crilly (2011). Cognitive Scope of the Firm: Explaining Stakeholder Orientation From the Inside-Out. Business and Society 50 (3):518-530.
    This dissertation abstract and the reflection commentary present the work of Dr. Donal Crilly. The dissertation addresses stakeholder orientation of the firm through an “inside-out” perspective. The dissertation abstract explains the research questions, setting, and methods. The reflection commentary discusses the author’s views of research process as a junior scholar.
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  43. Refik Culpan & John Trussel (2005). Applying the Agency and Stakeholder Theories to the Enron Debacle: An Ethical Perspective. Business and Society Review 110 (1):59-76.
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  44. Nicolas M. Dahan, Jonathan P. Doh & Jonathan D. Raelin (2015). Pivoting the Role of Government in the Business and Society Interface: A Stakeholder Perspective. Journal of Business Ethics 131 (3):665-680.
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  45. Cedric Dawkins (2015). Agonistic Pluralism and Stakeholder Engagement. Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (1):1-28.
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  46. F. G. A. de Bakker & F. den Hond (2007). The Politics of Stakeholder Influence: Introduction to the Special Issue. Business and Society 47 (1):8-20.
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  47. Frank de Bakker & Frank den Hond (2008). Introducing the Politics of Stakeholder Influence: A Review Essay. Business and Society 47 (1):8-20.
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  48. M. Deck (1994). Essay in the Toronto Conference: Reflections on Stakeholder Theory. Business and Society 33 (1):108-10.
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  49. Robbin Derry (2012). Reclaiming Marginalized Stakeholders. Journal of Business Ethics 111 (2):253-264.
    Within stakeholder literature, much attention has been given to which stakeholders "really count." This article strives to explain why organizational theorists should abandon the pursuit of "Who and What Really Counts" to challenge the assumption of a managerial perspective that defines stakeholder legitimacy. Reflecting on the paucity of employee rights and protections in marginalized work environments, I argue that as organizational researchers, we must recognize and take responsibility for the impact of our research models and visions. By confronting and rethinking (...)
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  50. Nicholas Dew & Saras D. Sarasvathy (2007). Innovations, Stakeholders & Entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):267-283.
    In modern societies entrepreneurship and innovation are widely seen as key sources of economic growth and welfare increases. Yet entrepreneurial innovation has also meant losses and hardships for some members of society: it is destructive of some stakeholders’ wellbeing even as it creates new wellbeing among other stakeholders. Both the positive benefits and negative externalities of innovation are problematic because entrepreneurs initiate new ventures before their private profitability and/or social costs can be fully recognized. In this paper we consider three (...)
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