This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

84 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 84
  1. Sticks and Stones: A Reply to Warren.Jonathan E. Adler - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):639-655.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Is There a Right of Freedom of Expression?Larry Alexander - 2008 - Law and Philosophy 27 (1):97-104.
    In this provocative book, Alexander offers a sceptical appraisal of the claim that freedom of expression is a human right. He examines the various contexts in which a right to freedom of expression might be asserted and concludes that such a right cannot be supported in any of these contexts. He argues that some legal protection of freedom of expression is surely valuable, though the form such protection will take will vary with historical and cultural circumstances and is not a (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  3. L. W. Sumner, The Hateful and the Obscene:The Hateful and the Obscene.Larry Alexander - 2006 - Ethics 116 (4):809-813.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Insults, Free Speech and Offensiveness.David Archard - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):127-141.
    This article examines what is wrong with some expressive acts, ‘insults’. Their putative wrongfulness is distinguished from the causing of indirect harms, aggregated harms, contextual harms, and damaging misrepresentations. The article clarifies what insults are, making use of work by Neu and Austin, and argues that their wrongfulness cannot lie in the hurt that is caused to those at whom such acts are directed. Rather it must lie in what they seek to do, namely to denigrate the other. The causing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Book Censorship in France.David Armstrong & Thomas M. Burton - forthcoming - Journal of Information Ethics.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Recent Work in Freedom of Speech.Arthur John - 1997 - Philosophical Books 38 (4):225-234.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. SETTINGS OF PRESS FREEDOM AND PUBLIC OPINION IN HEGEL.Agemir Bavaresco & Paulo Roberto Konzen - 2009 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 50 (119):63-92.
    New settings for communication are being built, having, at one side, great corporations of television, radio, press and on line media, and at the other side the role of the independent / alternative press, understood as not bound to a private, public or state enterprise or to some economic group. It takes gradually shape the constitution of the opposition between the traditional media and the independent / alternative press, having as a material base the new technologies of information. How can (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. The Right of Free Expression.Fred R. Berger - 1986 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):1-10.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Business Ethics and Free Speech on the Internet.Brian Berkey - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-9.
    The unique role of the Internet in today’s society, and the extensive reach and potentially profound impact of much Internet content, raise philosophically interesting and practically urgent questions about the responsibilities of various agents, including individual Internet users, governments, and corporations. Raphael Cohen-Almagor’s Confronting the Internet’s Dark Side is an extremely valuable contribution to the emerging discussion of these important issues. In this paper, I focus on the obligations of Internet Service Providers and Web Hosting Services with respect to online (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Unmuzzle Us!Sanford Berman - 2005 - Journal of Information Ethics 14 (1):5-5.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Art and Freedom of Speech.Randall P. Bezanson - unknown
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Stanley, Jason. How Propaganda Works. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2015. Pp. 376. $29.95 (Cloth); $19.95 (Paper). [REVIEW]Renee Jorgensen Bolinger - 2017 - Ethics 127 (2):502-507.
  13. Commanding and Controlling Protest Crowds.Kylie Bourne - 2011 - Critical Horizons 12 (2):189-210.
    Police and authorities have increasingly adopted "command and control" strategies to the policing of intentionally peaceful protest crowds. These strategies work to close down access to a physical space in which a protest is to occur and thus in turn they effectively restrict the capacity of a citizen to engage in the democratic right of peaceful protest.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Imagination, Prophecy, and Morality: The Relevance and Limits of Spinoza's Theory of Political Myth.J. Brennan - 2014 - Télos 2014 (169):64-83.
    Myth presents us with two major problems: definition and usage. In this paper I focus on the latter problem and argue in defense of Spinoza’s theory of political myth as opposed to the dichotomy of “myth as progress” and “myth as regression.” Spinoza’s theory is preferable because it allows for a full-bodied understanding of myth, its legitimate uses and its dangers for slipping into superstition. Because myth plays on the imagination, the basest form of knowledge available to all people and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. A Transformative Theory of Religious Freedom.Corey Brettschneider - 2010 - Political Theory 38 (2):187-213.
    Religious freedom is often thought to protect not only religious practices but also the underlying religious beliefs of citizens. But what should be said about religious beliefs that oppose religious freedom itself or that deny the concept of equal citizenship? The author argues here that such beliefs, while protected against coercive sanction, are rightly subject to attempts at transformation by the state in its expressive capacities. Transformation is entailed by a commitment to publicizing the reasons and principles that justify the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. When the State Speaks What Should.Corey Brettschneider - 2010 - Perspectives on Politics.
  17. Civil Disobedience.Kimberley Brownlee - 2007 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  18. Freedom of Speech: Liberals Yersus Radicals.William Bruening - 1976 - Journal of Social Philosophy 7 (3):1-4.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Homosexuality and Freedom of Speech.R. D. Catterall - 1980 - Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):128-129.
  20. Ubuntuand Freedom of Expression.Colin Chasi - 2014 - Ethics and Behavior 24 (6):495-509.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. A Critical Response to Thomas Peard on Sexual Harassment and the Limits of Free Speech.J. Caleb Clanton - 2009 - Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):57-61.
  22. Here Comes a Chopper to Chop Off Your Head-Freedom of Expression Vs Censorship in America.E. Cline - 1995 - Journal of Information Ethics 4 (2):18-32.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Advertisements, Stereotypes, and Freedom of Expression.Moshe Cohen-Eliya & Yoav Hammer - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):165–187.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  24. Two Types of Self-Censorship: Public and Private.Philip Cook & Conrad Heilmann - 2013 - Political Studies 61 (1):178-196.
    We develop and defend a distinction between two types of self-censorship: public and private. First, we suggest that public self-censorship refers to a range of individual reactions to a public censorship regime. Second, private self-censorship is the suppression by an agent of his or her own attitudes where a public censor is either absent or irrelevant. The distinction is derived from a descriptive approach to self-censorship that asks: who is the censor, who is the censee, and how do they interact? (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Free Speech, Fair Trials, Lawyers and the Mediaan Overview of Recent Developments.Ian Cram - 1998 - Legal Ethics 1 (2):119-122.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Democratic Ideals and Media Realities: A Puzzling Free Press Paradox.Michael Kent Curtis - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (2):385-427.
    Freedom of speech, press, assembly, and petition have long been celebrated as crucial to democratic government. United States Supreme Court decisions have, quite rightly, justified strong protection of these freedoms because of their crucial role in the functioning of American democracy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW]de Bruin Boudewijn - 2008 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that the empirical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. The Philosophical Case For Pornography.Danny Frederick - manuscript
  29. Freedom: Positive, Negative, Expressive.Danny Frederick - 2016 - Reason Papers 38 (2):39-63.
    I apply Karl Popper’s conception of critical rationality to the question of personal fulfilment. I show that such fulfilment normally depends upon the person achieving positive freedom, and that positive freedom requires negative freedom, including freedom of expression. If the state has legitimacy, its central duty must be the enforcement of those rules that provide the best prospects for personal fulfilment for the people under its jurisdiction. The state is therefore morally debarred from suppressing freedom of expression. I consider and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Pornography and Freedom.Danny Frederick - 2011 - Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):84-95.
    I defend pornography as an important aspect of freedom of expression, which is essential for autonomy, self-development, the growth of knowledge and human flourishing. I rebut the allegations that pornography depraves and corrupts, degrades women, is harmful to children, exposes third parties to risk of offence or assault, and violates women ’s civil rights and liberties. I contend that suppressing pornography would have a range of unintended evil consequences, including loss of beneficial technology, creeping censorship, black markets, corruption and extensive (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory.Katharine Gelber - 2010 - Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
    Much of the most influential free speech scholarship emphasises that ‘political speech’ warrants the very highest standards of protection because of its centrality to self-governance. This central idea mitigates against efforts to justify the regulation of political speech and renders some egregiously offensive or harmful speech worthy of protection from a theoretical perspective. Yet paradoxically, in practice, in many liberal democracies such speech is routinely restricted. In this paper, I develop an argument that is compatible with both the argument from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32. Expression as Realization: Speakers' Interests in Freedom of Speech.Jonathan Gilmore - 2011 - Law and Philosophy 30 (5):517-539.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Freedom of Speech and Access to Mass Media.Joseph Grcic - 1988 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):51-58.
  34. Censorship and Free Speech.J. Healy, (ed.) - 2004 - The Spinney Press.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. The Radical Potential of Listening: A Preliminary Exploration.Lisa Heldke - 2007 - Radical Philosophy Today 5:25-46.
    In On Liberty, John Stuart Mill argues that free speech possesses value because listening is valuable: it can advance one’s own thinking and action. However, listening becomes difficult when one finds the views of a speaker to be wrong, repellant, or even simply naïve. Everyday wisdom would have it that such cases present the greatest opportunities for growth. Is there substance to this claim? In particular, is there radical political value to be found in listening to others at the very (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Do You Mind If I Speak Freely?Lisa Heldke - 1991 - Social Theory and Practice 17 (3):349-368.
    In this paper, I develop a way to conceive of free speech that begins by redefining speech. My definition affirms the fact that speaking is an activity that goes on among people in a community. Speaking, I will suggest, is an activity that involves not only the present speaker, but also others who act as listeners and potential speakers. I contend that liberal conceptions of free speech have often proven ill equipped to address certain free speech issues, precisely because they (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Democracy, Paternalism, and Campaign Finance.Adam Hosein - forthcoming - Public Affairs Quarterly.
  38. Transparency, Corruption, and Democratic Institutions.Graham Hubbs - 2014 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 9 (1):65-83.
    This essay examines some of the institutional arrangements that underlie corruption in democracy. It begins with a discussion of institutions as such, elaborating and extending some of John Searle’s remarks on the topic. It then turns to an examination of specifically democratic institutions; it draws here on Joshua Cohen’s recent Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals. One of the central concerns of Cohen’s Rousseau is how to arrange civic institutions so that they are able to perform their public functions without (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan Hurley - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):165-218.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  40. Bypassing Conscious Control: Media Violence, Unconscious Imitation, and Freedom of Speech.Susan L. Hurley - 2006 - In S. Pockett, W. Banks & S. Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press.
    Why does it matter whether and how individuals consciously control their behavior? It matters for many reasons. Here I focus on concerns about social influences of which agents are typically unaware on aggressive behavior.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41. Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech.Susan L. Hurley - 2006 - In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. pp. 301-337.
  42. Freedom of Speech : Why Freedom of Speech Includes Hate Speech.Daniel Jacobson - 2007 - In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Freedom of Speech Acts? A Response to Langton.Daniel Jacobson - 1995 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (1):64-78.
  44. There's No Such Thing as Heresy (and It's a Good Thing, Too): William of Ockham on Freedom of Speech.Sharon Kaye - 1998 - Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (1):41–52.
  45. Freedom of Speech Abridged?: Cultural, Legal and Philosophical Challenges.Anine Kierulf & Helge Rønning (eds.) - 2009 - Nordicom.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Whither Academic Freedom?E. R. Klein - 2002 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):41-53.
    Academic freedom has become the enemy of the individual professors working in colleges and universities across the United States. Despite its historical (and maybe even essential) roots in the First Amendment, contemporary case law has consistently shown that professors, unlike most members of society, have no rights to free speech on their respective campuses. (Ironically, this is especially true on our State campuses.) Outlined is the dramatic change in the history of the courts from recognizing “academic freedom” as a construct (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Pornography and Free Speech.Rae Langton - 2000 - The Philosophers' Magazine 11 (11):41-42.
  48. Rhetoric and Anti-Semitism.Lawrence Lengbeyer - 2004 - Academic Questions 17 (2):22-32.
    Given that charges of anti-Semitism, racism, and the like continue to be potent weapons of moral and intellectual critique in our culture, it is important that we work toward a clear understanding about just what sorts of conduct and circumstances constitute these moral offenses. In particular, can criticism of a state (such as Israel), or other social or political institution or organization (such as the NAACP), ever amount to anti-Semitism, racism, or other bigotry against the people represented by or associated (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. The Solution to the Real Blackmail Paradox: The Common Link Between Blackmail and Other Criminal Threats.Ken Levy - 2007 - Connecticut Law Review 39:1051-1096.
    Disclosure of true but reputation-damaging information is generally legal. But threats to disclose true but reputation-damaging information unless payment is made are generally criminal. Many scholars think that this situation is paradoxical because it seems to involve illegality mysteriously arising out of legality, a criminal act mysteriously arising out of an independently legal threat to disclose conjoined with an independently legal demand for money. -/- But this formulation is not quite right. The real paradox raised by the different legal statuses (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50. Book Review:Liberalism Divided: Freedom of Speech and the Many Uses of State Power. Owen M. Fiss. [REVIEW]Robert Justin Lipkin - 1997 - Ethics 107 (4):737-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 84