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Summary Friedrich Nietzsche is a 19th century German philosopher. He began his career as a philologist. Due to illness he retired from active academic life as a philologist in the summer of 1879 and devoted himself fully to the writing of his philosophical works. Nietzsche is most famous for his word God is dead. While it is not clear whether this word implies atheism, agnosticism or depth-theism, it shows that theological, metaphysical and moral issues inform the work of Nietzsche. For a long time Nietzsche was considered a philosophical dilettante, a mystic or a poet-philosopher. This view has been significantly altered by Heidegger's Nietzsche lectures from 1936-44 which characterize him as a systematic, metaphysically-oriented philosopher. In the Anglo-American world works of scholars such as Arthur C. Danto and John Richardson have also shown that Nietzsche should be taken seriously as a philosopher. Aside from Nietzsche's metaphysics (which encompasses the concepts of will to power, eternal recurrence, Uebermensch and nihilism), the German philosopher provided an original interpretation and critique of Christian ethics and morality. This work is found in the two major works On The Genealogy Of Morals and Beyond Good And Evil. Throughout his work Nietzsche is in dialogue with the Western philosophical tradition, which he severely criticizes. True to the task of cultural physician he takes upon himself the difficult endeavour of becoming the bad conscience of Western civilization. His main philosophic interlocutors are the Platonic and Xenophonic Socrates, Plato, the Stoics, Kant, Hegel and Schopenhauer.
Key works Danto 1965 A good introduction to Nietzsche's work by a philosopher in the Anglo-American analytical tradition. Contributed to show Nietzsche is to be taken seriously philosophically. Deleuze & Hardt 2006 A continental reading of Nietzsche's philosophy which challenges the connections between Hegel and Nietzsche established by Heidegger's landmarks lectures on Nietsche. Heidegger 1961 Canonical reading of Nietzsche in the 20th century. This interpretation changed the map and made clear that Nietzsche was a philosopher and perhaps a metaphysician. Heidegger claims that Nietzsche over-turns Platonism and completes Western metaphysics. Löwith 1964 Loewith was a student of Heidegger and a philosopher in his own right. This book and Nietzsche's Philosophy of Eternal Recurrence constitute classical studies of Nietzsche's work based on the historical approach to scholarship.
Introductions Heidegger & Magnus 1967 Solomon 1988 Leiter 2002
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  1. Existentialism and Monty Python: Kafka, Camus, Nietzsche, and Sartre.Edward Slowik - 2006 - In George Reisch & G. Hardcastle (eds.), Monty Python and Philosophy. Chicago, IL: Open Court: pp. 173-186.
    This essay utilizes the work of the comedy group, Monty Python, as a means of introducing basic concepts in Existentialism, especially as it pertains to the writings of Nietzsche, Sartre, and Camus.
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  2. A Nietzschean Theory of Emotional Experience: Affect as Feeling Towards Value.Jonathan Mitchell - forthcoming - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy.
    This paper offers a Nietzschean theory of emotion as expressed by following thesis: paradigmatic emotional experiences exhibit a distinctive kind of affective intentionality, specified in terms of felt valenced attitudes towards the (apparent) evaluative properties of their objects. Emotional experiences, on this Nietzschean view, are therefore fundamentally feelings towards value. This interpretation explains how Nietzschean affects can have evaluative intentional content without being constituted by cognitive states, as these feelings towards value are neither reducible to, nor to be thought along (...)
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  3. Nietzsche and Unamuno on Conatus and the Agapeic Way of Life.Alberto Oya - 2020 - Metaphilosophy 51 (2-3):303-317.
    Unamuno saw in his defense of religious faith a response to Nietzsche’s criticisms of the Christian, agapeic way of life. To Nietzsche’s claim that engaging in this way of life is something antinatural and life-denying, insofar as it goes against the (alleged) natural tendency to increase one’s own power, Unamuno responded that an agapeic way of life is precisely a direct expression of this natural tendency. Far from being something that goes against our natural inclinations, Unamuno says, an agapeic way (...)
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  4. In Praise of Depth: Or, How I Stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Hidden.Joshua Landy - 2020 - New Literary History 1 (51):145-76.
    In recent years, some prominent scholars have been making a surprising claim: examining literary texts for hidden depths is overblown, misguided, or indeed downright dangerous. Such examination, they’ve warned us, may lead to the loss of world Heidegger warned of (Gumbrecht), to the world-denying metaphysics Nietzsche warned of (Nehamas), or to the suspicious form of hermeneutics Ricoeur warned of (Best, Marcus, Moi). This paper seeks to suggest that, though the concerns are understandable, there’s ultimately nothing to worry about. The fact (...)
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  5. A Modern Polytheism? Nietzsche and James.Jordan Rodgers - 2020 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 34 (1):69-96.
    Polytheism is a strange view to hold in modernity. Connected as it is in the popular imagination with archaic, animistic, magical, prescientific systems of thought, we don’t hesitate much before casting it into the dustbin of history. Even if we are not monotheists, we are likely to think of monotheism as the obviously more plausible position. The traditional arguments for the existence of God, which have been enormously influential in Western philosophy of religion, do not necessarily rule out polytheism but (...)
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  6. »Political Correctness« als Sklavenmoral? Zur politischen Theorie der Privilegienkritik.Karsten Schubert - 2020 - Leviathan 48 (1):29-51.
    (English below) Rechte Intellektuelle berufen sich oft auf Nietzsches Konzept der Sklavenmoral, um damit ihre Kritik an ‚political correctness‘ zu untermauern. Diese Verschaltung von Nietzsches Sklavenmoral und ‚PC‘-Kritik ist zutreffend, wie die systematische Analyse ihrer gemeinsamen Elemente zeigt, die zu einer Neubeschreibung von ‚PC‘-Kritik als Privilegienverteidigung führt. Im Gegensatz zur rechtsnietzscheanischen ‚PC‘-Kritik zeigt der linksnietzscheanische Begriff des privilegienkritischen ‚politischen Urteilens‘, dass Politik ein Kampf um Macht und Ansprüche ist, wobei der politische Raum und seine Diskurse immer verregelt und ein Verteilungssystem (...)
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  7. Nietzsche's Search for Philosophy: On the Middle Writings by Keith Ansell-Pearson, And: Nietzsche's Free Spirit Works: A Dialectical Reading by Matthew Meyer.Paul Franco - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):139-144.
    There was a time in the not too distant past when one would be obliged to begin a review like this with a comment about the relative neglect of Nietzsche’s middle works, HH, D, and GS. That time now seems to be well behind us. In recent years, there has been a spate of scholarly books devoted to these works, including Ruth Abbey’s Nietzsche’s Middle Period, Michael Ure’s Nietzsche’s Therapy: Self-Cultivation in the Middle Works, Jonathan Cohen’s Science, Culture, and Free (...)
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  8. Unpublished Fragments From the Period of Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Summer 1882–Winter 1883/84) by Friedrich Nietzsche.Robin Small - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):133-139.
    The Stanford University Press edition of Nietzsche’s works in English translation continues here with the Nachlass from what is described as “the period of Thus Spoke Zarathustra.” Based on the edition of Giorgio Colli and Mazzino Montinari, it corresponds to volume 10 of their Sämtliche Werke: Kritische Studienausgabe and to volume 7/1 of their Kritische Gesamtausgabe: Werke, which appeared in 1976. Colli and Montinari’s editorial apparatus has been included, and the translators, Paul S. Loeb and David F. Tinsley, have added (...)
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  9. The German Online Editions of Nietzsche's Works: A User's Perspective.Marc Colsen - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):98-119.
    Suppose you are a student or an aspiring scholar taking your first steps into the labyrinthine world of Nietzsche text editions. You have been told two things. First, when reading, quoting, or referring to a Nietzsche text, use the most reliable text version available. There is a long history of textual forgeries and inaccuracies, so your choice of text version matters. Second, when interpreting Nietzsche’s work, avoid one-sidedness or cherry-picking. If you encounter tensions or contradictions, don’t try to smooth them (...)
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  10. Nietzsche's "Great Politics" and Zarathustra's New Peoples.Birte Loschenkohl - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):21-45.
    [...] Revaluation of all values: that is my formula for the highest act of humanity’s self-reflection, an act that has become flesh and genius in me. [...] I am a bearer of glad tidings as no one ever was before; I am acquainted with incredibly elevated tasks, where even the concept of these tasks has been lacking so far; only from me onwards are there new hopes. With all this I am at the same time necessarily a man of calamity. (...)
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  11. Nietzsche's The Gay Science: An Introduction by Michael Ure.Matthew Meyer - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):120-125.
    Michael Ure’s introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s The Gay Science is a welcome contribution to the secondary literature. He provides a clear and coherent account of this complex text and situates his interpretation within Nietzsche’s larger oeuvre and philosophical project. Ure advances an original thesis—GS is Nietzsche’s attempt to revive an ancient understanding of philosophy as a way of life—that will be of interest to scholars more generally, and yet he still succeeds in introducing the text to the novice reader. Although (...)
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  12. Nietzsche on the Function and Creation of Value Systems.Iain Morrisson - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):67-97.
    We know from D and elsewhere that Nietzsche rejects the idea that values are mind-independent. He writes, “[T]here is nothing good, nothing beautiful, nothing sublime, nothing evil in itself, but [...] there are states of soul in which we impose such words upon things external to and within us”.1 But Nietzsche never supplements this position with an account of how evaluative properties are imposed.2 Though he often suggests that values originate with drives and affects, specific or systematic details on precisely (...)
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  13. Nietzsche on the Decadence and Flourishing of Culture by Andrew Huddleston. [REVIEW]Tom Stern - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):125-133.
    Andrew Huddleston’s book sets out a vision of Nietzsche as a philosopher of culture. His approach sheds light on some familiar problems and opens up a new way of thinking about cultural criticism. Nietzsche’s concern, he argues, lies with both the instrumental and final value of both individuals and whole cultures. In terms of the Anglophone secondary literature, this places Huddleston between Leiter, who tends to suggest that individuals are all that matters, and Young, who tends to suggest that communities (...)
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  14. Letter From the Editor.Jessica N. Berry - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):vii-vii.
    Dear Readers,In this issue, several authors contribute their insights on social and political themes in Nietzsche: Robert Miner looks to the works of the “middle period” to add nuance to Nietzsche’s critical attitude to socialism; Birte Loschenkohl asks again what Nietzsche has in mind with his enigmatic call for “great politics,” arguing that Zarathustra holds the key to understanding his vision; and Sacha Golob looks back to the second Untimely Meditation to analyze Nietzsche’s views on education and the role that (...)
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  15. Nietzsche as Critic and Proponent of Socialism: A Reappraisal Based on Human, All Too Human.Robert Miner - 2020 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 51 (1):1-20.
    The picture of Nietzsche as a thinker who simply disdained socialism dies hard. Routinely assimilating Nietzsche to right-wing movements, popular journalism continues to reinforce this picture of his thought.1 Scholarly readers of Nietzsche have not generally made this crude mistake. Nonetheless, interpreters who regard Nietzsche’s thought as essentially nonpolitical generally ignore the passages in his works that mention socialism, perhaps assuming that what he says about the topic is superficial and merits little attention. “Anti-political” readings that see Nietzsche as intensely (...)
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  16. The Vienna Circle’s Responses to Lebensphilosophie.Andreas Vrahimis - forthcoming - Logique Et Analyse.
  17. Foucault and the Two Approaches to Biopolitics.Marco Piasentier - 2018 - In Hannah Richter (ed.), Biopolitical Governance Race, Gender and Economy. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 21-39.
    What is biopolitics? What kind of relationship does biopolitics establish between politics and biology? Although the etymology of the term ‘biopoli- tics’ seems to suggest a straightforward meaning resulting from the relation- ship between biological life and politics, the current literature is characterised by a wide variety of definitions. As the social theorist Thomas Lemke notes in his thoughtful introduction to this field of research, ‘[p]lural and divergent meanings are undoubtedly evoked when people refer to biopolitics’ (Lemke 2011, 2). Lemke (...)
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  18. Travolta’s Elvis-Man and the Nietzschean Superman.Ian Schnee & Bence Nanay - 2007 - In K. Silem Mohammad & Richard Greene (eds.), Quentin Tarantino and Philosophy. Chicago: Open Court.
    Vincent Vega from Pulp Fiction and the Nietzschian Superman!!!
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  19. Winckelmann’s Apollo, Nietzsche’s Dionysus.Babette Babich - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):187-218.
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  20. Wilamowitz Vs. Winckelmann.Louis A. Ruprecht - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):169-186.
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  21. Heidegger, Nietzsche, and the Problem of Ποίησις.Holger Schmid - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):75-88.
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  22. Nietzsche and the Magisterial Tradition.James Q. Whitman - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):153-168.
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  23. A Tremendous Chasm.Helmut Müller-Sievers - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):15-34.
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  24. Greek Music-Drama.Friedrich Nietzsche - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):1-13.
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  25. The Dionysian Worldview.Friedrich Nietzsche - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):135-151.
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  26. Übersehen: An Architecture of Tragic Vision.Gary Shapiro - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):103-132.
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  27. The ‘Optics’ of Science, Art and Life.Tracy Burr Strong - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):89-102.
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  28. Liberating Art’s Knowledge From Metaphysics in Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy.Dieter Jahnig - 2017 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (3-4):35-74.
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  29. The Intellectual Relationship Between Nietzsche and Freud.Richard Waugaman - 1973 - Psychiatry 36:458-467.
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  30. Nietzsche’s Goethe: In Sickness and In Health.Nicholas Martin - 2013 - Publications of the English Goethe Society 77:113-124.
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  31. Nietzsche’s Napoleon: The Higher Man as Political Actor.Paul F. Glenn - 2001 - The Review of Politics 63:129-158.
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  32. Nietzsche’s Immoralism.Philippa Foot - 1994 - In Richard Schacht (ed.), Nietzsche, Genealogy, Morality: Essays on Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals. Berkeley: The University of California Press. pp. 3-14.
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  33. Nietzsche and Romanticism: Goethe, Hölderlin, and Wagner.Adrian Del Caro - 2013 - In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 108-133.
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  34. The Influence of Nietzsche on Freud’s Ideas.A. H. Chapman & Mirian Chapman-Santana - 1995 - British Journal of Psychiatry 74:251-253.
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  35. Nietzsche's Value Monism: Saying Yes to Everything.John Richardson - 2015 - In Manuel Dries & Peter Kail (eds.), Nietzsche on Mind and Nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 89-119.
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  36. Newton Contra Alt-Right Nietzsche: Dionysus as Androgynous Black Panther.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - The Pluralist.
    In this article, I channel the autobiography of Black Panther cofounder Huey P. Newton, entitled Revolutionary Suicide, against the misogyny of the alt-right movement today. Both Newton and the alt-right have been powerfully influenced by Nietzsche, but one way of grasping the central difference between them is by comparing their conceptions of Dionysus. While the alt-right sticks closer to Nietzsche’s conception, which minimizes the god’s androgyny, Newton’s thought resonates with that androgyny, thereby bringing him closer to the most influential Dionysus (...)
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  37. An Interpretation of Nietzsche's On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life by Anthony K. Jensen.Jeffrey Church - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):332-335.
    The second of Nietzsche's UM, "On the Uses and Disadvantage of History for Life", is one of his most celebrated and influential works, profoundly shaping the work of Continental theorists such as Martin Heidegger, Michel Foucault, and Paul de Man. For all the immense attention paid to this little text, philosophers and scholars have focused mainly on Nietzsche's reflections on culture, overlooking the text's epistemological concerns. Jensen's commentary rectifies this omission and succeeds admirably not only in analyzing the often cryptic (...)
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  38. Nietzsche's Culture of Humanity: Beyond Aristocracy and Democracy in the Early Period by Jeffrey Church.Rachel Cristy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):336-342.
    Jeffrey Church's book Nietzsche's Culture of Humanity is a flawed but nonetheless significant contribution to the still fairly scant Anglophone literature on Nietzsche's early works. The book argues for two major intertwined theses and a third, less central one. The first thesis is that Nietzsche distinguishes between two types or layers of culture: national culture, which Nietzsche characterizes in §1 of the first essay of UM as "unity of artistic style in all the expressions of the life of a people," (...)
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  39. The Deed Is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action by Aaron Ridley.Lisa Hicks - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):342-347.
    Aaron Ridley's The Deed Is Everything: Nietzsche on Will and Action uses the notion of expressivism to draw together several strands of Nietzschean thought into a view that both challenges and complements previous accounts of agency in general and previous secondary-literature accounts of Nietzsche's view of agency in particular. The book consists of an introduction, six chapters, and a conclusion. In this review, I briefly discuss each chapter with a particular focus on Ridley's distinction between the "letter" and the "spirit" (...)
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  40. Nietzsche on the Origin of Conscience and Obligation.Avery Snelson - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):310-331.
    The second essay of Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality (GM) offers a naturalistic and developmental account of the emergence of conscience, a faculty uniquely responsive to remembering and honoring obligations. This article attempts to solve an interpretive puzzle that is invited by the second essay's explanation of nonmoral obligation, prior to the capacity to feel guilt. Ostensibly, Nietzsche argues that the conscience and our concept of obligation originated within contractual (“creditor-debtor”) relations, when creditors punished delinquent debtors (GM II:5). However, this interpretation, (...)
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  41. Nietzsche's Attack on Belief: Doxastic Skepticism in The Antichrist.Jessica N. Berry - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):187-209.
    Nietzsche's Antichrist is subtitled "A Curse on Christianity." In its last numbered section, he pronounces his "eternal indictment" of two millennia of tradition: —Now I have come to the end and I pronounce my judgment. I condemn Christianity, I indict the Christian church on the most terrible charges an accuser has ever had in his mouth. I consider it the greatest corruption conceivable, it had the will to the last possible corruption. [...] I want to write this eternal indictment of (...)
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  42. Making Knowledge the Most Powerful Affect: Overcoming Affective Nihilism.Kaitlyn N. Creasy - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):210-232.
    In an 1881 letter, Nietzsche remarks incredulously that he is "utterly amazed" to have found in Spinoza "a precursor" with whom he shares an "overtendency [...] to make knowledge the most powerful affect."1 It is this tendency to assign knowledge and ways of knowing the functional role of an affect that I intend to investigate as a means of overcoming affective nihilism.2 In particular, it is by participating in certain practices of self-knowledge and introducing oneself, experimentally, to new sites and (...)
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  43. Strangers to Ourselves: Self-Knowledge in Nietzsche's Genealogy.Tom R. Hanauer - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):250-271.
    There is a wide scholarly consensus that Nietzsche's GM contains two principal projects. First, GM aims to explain—historically and psychologically—how some of morality's central strands emerged and evolved into their contemporary forms; and, second, GM aims to provide a critical assessment of the value of morality itself. Brian Leiter captures this consensus when he writes, "By investigating the origin of morality Nietzsche hopes to undermine morality or, more precisely, to loosen the attachment of potentially great human beings to this morality."1 (...)
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  44. Nietzsche's Transformation of the Problem of Pessimism in Human, All Too Human.Scott Jenkins - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):272-291.
    Book I of HH would seem to announce the end of Nietzsche's concern with the philosophical pessimism that shapes BT and figures prominently in HL. In BT he endorses the pessimistic thesis that the best thing for a human being is to die soon, while he announces in HH that the even the words "optimism" and "pessimism" are outdated since they play a role in a theological discourse that is gradually dying out. This change is connected with another, namely Nietzsche's (...)
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  45. Three Modes of History in On the Genealogy of Morality.Daisy Laforce - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):292-309.
    Nietzsche's GM 1 is now a recognized masterpiece, but there are still widely varying views about its historical aims and methods.2 What is clear is that Nietzsche's decision to call this work a "genealogy" signals that its purpose is to trace morality's ancestors in the history of human valuing.3 It is also generally agreed that this genealogy is intended to serve a critical function, as Nietzsche himself says, "we need a critique of moral values, for once the value of these (...)
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  46. Nietzsche and Shame.Joel A. Van Fossen - 2019 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 50 (2):233-249.
    In the preface to GS, Nietzsche famously exclaims, "Those Greeks were superficial—out of profundity!".1 And he attributes one aspect of this profound superficiality to the Greeks' "respect for the bashfulness [Scham] with which nature has hidden behind riddles and iridescent uncertainties". For Nietzsche, both the Greeks' shame and their respect for shame played important and healthy psychological and social roles. So, Nietzsche praises shame in the sense that "care [Scham] for one's reputation" is characteristic of noble types and a "highly (...)
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  47. On Opera.Bernard Williams - 2006 - New Haven: Yale University Press.
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  48. Nietzsche's Revaluation of Socrates.Christopher C. Raymond - 2019 - In Christopher Moore (ed.), Brill's Companion to the Reception of Socrates. Leiden, Netherlands: pp. 837–80.
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  49. Nietzsche.Andrew Huddleston - 2019 - In John Shand (ed.), Blackwell Companion to 19th Century Philosophy. Oxford:
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  50. Nietzsche on Magnanimity, Greatness, and Greatness of Soul.Andrew Huddleston - forthcoming - In Sophia Vasalou (ed.), The Measure of Greatness: Philosophers on Magnanimity. Oxford, UK:
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