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Summary Friedrich Nietzsche is a 19th century German philosopher. He began his career as a philologist. Due to illness he retired from active academic life as a philologist in the summer of 1879 and devoted himself fully to the writing of his philosophical works. Nietzsche is most famous for his word God is dead. While it is not clear whether this word implies atheism, agnosticism or depth-theism, it shows that theological, metaphysical and moral issues inform the work of Nietzsche. For a long time Nietzsche was considered a philosophical dilettante, a mystic or a poet-philosopher. This view has been significantly altered by Heidegger's Nietzsche lectures from 1936-44 which characterize him as a systematic, metaphysically-oriented philosopher. In the Anglo-American world works of scholars such as Arthur C. Danto and John Richardson have also shown that Nietzsche should be taken seriously as a philosopher. Aside from Nietzsche's metaphysics (which encompasses the concepts of will to power, eternal recurrence, Uebermensch and nihilism), the German philosopher provided an original interpretation and critique of Christian ethics and morality. This work is found in the two major works On The Genealogy Of Morals and Beyond Good And Evil. Throughout his work Nietzsche is in dialogue with the Western philosophical tradition, which he severely criticizes. True to the task of cultural physician he takes upon himself the difficult endeavour of becoming the bad conscience of Western civilization. His main philosophic interlocutors are the Platonic and Xenophonic Socrates, Plato, the Stoics, Kant, Hegel and Schopenhauer.
Key works Danto 1965 A good introduction to Nietzsche's work by a philosopher in the Anglo-American analytical tradition. Contributed to show Nietzsche is to be taken seriously philosophically. Deleuze & Hardt 2006 A continental reading of Nietzsche's philosophy which challenges the connections between Hegel and Nietzsche established by Heidegger's landmarks lectures on Nietsche. Heidegger 1961 Canonical reading of Nietzsche in the 20th century. This interpretation changed the map and made clear that Nietzsche was a philosopher and perhaps a metaphysician. Heidegger claims that Nietzsche over-turns Platonism and completes Western metaphysics. Löwith 1964 Loewith was a student of Heidegger and a philosopher in his own right. This book and Nietzsche's Philosophy of Eternal Recurrence constitute classical studies of Nietzsche's work based on the historical approach to scholarship.
Introductions Heidegger & Magnus 1967 Solomon & Higgins 1988 Leiter 2002
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  1. Introduction.Jessica N. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  2. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  3. Czas i chwila, pamięć i zapomnienie. Nietzscheańska koncepcja wiecznego powrotu.Przemysław Bursztyka - 2011 - In Pamięć w dobie internetu. pp. 45-70.
  4. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  5. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  6. Faits divers.Clément Rosset, Nicolas Delon & Santiago Espinosa - 2013 - Paris, France: Presses Universitaires de France.
    Gilles Deleuze, les vampires, Emil Cioran, Samuel Beckett, le dandysme, Friedrich Nietzsche, Raymond Roussel, Casanova, Arthur Schopenhauer, Jean-Luc Godard, Goscinny & Uderzo, Jean-Paul Sartre, Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Le réel, le double, l’illusion, le tragique, la joie, la musique, la philosophie, la politique, le péché, l’enseignement. Faits divers sont les miscellanées de Clément Rosset : le répertoire désordonné et jubilatoire de ses passions et de ses dégoûts, de ses intérêts et de ses bâillements, de ses tocades et de ses coups de (...)
  7. „Man vergilt einem Lehrer schlecht, wenn man immer nur der Schüler bleibt“: Ein neuer Blick auf Gasts Verhältnis zu Nietzsche.Fernando R. De Moraes Barros - 2018 - Nietzsche-Studien 47 (1):340-363.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Nietzsche-Studien Jahrgang: 47 Heft: 1 Seiten: 340-363.
  8. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  9. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  10. Nietzsche en España.Marco Parmeggiani & Fernando Fava - 2014 - In Guía de Nietzsche. Granada, Spain: Comares. pp. 285-312.
  11. The Choreography of the Soul: A Psychedelic Philosophy of Consciousness.Ed D'Angelo - manuscript
    This is a 2018 revision of my 1988 dissertation "The Choreography of the Soul" with a new Forward, a new Conclusion, a substantially revised Preface and Introduction, and many improvements to the body of the work. However, the thesis remains the same. A theory of consciousness and trance states--including psychedelic experience--is developed. Consciousness can be analyzed into two distinct but generally interrelated systems, which I call System X and System Y. System X is the emotional-visceral-kinaesthetic body. System X is a (...)
  12. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  13. Nietzsche's Metaphysics of the Will to Power: The Possibility of Value by Tsarina Doyle.Thomas Lambert - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):284-290.
    Tsarina Doyle’s bold new effort to interpret Nietzsche as a metaphysician will be of interest to readers concerned with his views on metaphysics, metaethics, and the philosophy of mind. Doyle argues that Nietzsche proposes the metaphysics of the will to power in response to the problem of nihilism, which emerges via the recognition of the unjustifiability of a traditional presupposition about our values—namely, that they are objective and meaningful in virtue of “corresponding to value properties instantiated in a mind-independent and (...)
  14. Contesting Nietzsche by Christa Davis Acampora.Joel A. Van Fossen - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):295-300.
    In Contesting Nietzsche, Christa Davis Acampora analyzes the significance for Nietzsche’s thought of the ancient Greek agon. She aims to show why the agon is important for understanding several philosophical themes prevalent in Nietzsche’s work, including naturalism, agency, and responsibility. Acampora also argues that we should understand Nietzsche’s own engagement with other philosophical contestants as part of his own agonistic enterprise, highlighting Homer, Socrates, Paul, and Wagner as four such competitors. Acampora’s analysis of the agon is helpful for understanding how (...)
  15. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221-221.
    What is the future of Nietzsche studies? What are the most pressing questions its scholars should address? What texts and issues demand our urgent attention? And as we turn to these issues, what methodological and interpretive principles should guide us? The Journal of Nietzsche Studies recently put these questions to some of the most prominent names in Anglophone Nietzsche scholarship. Here, we bring you ten thoughtful responses, as a starting point for shaping discussions in these pages and elsewhere about the (...)
  16. Introduction. Berry - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221.
  17. Philosophy, Psychology, and Theory.Bernard Reginster - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):260.
    The manner in which Nietzsche presents his ideas has long baffled his readers. Some take it to indicate that he is not a pursuing a traditional sort of philosophical project; for instance, he is not building a comprehensive system, composed of distinctive theories in all of the main areas of philosophy, such as a theory of knowledge, of value, of language, and so on. According to some commentators, his philosophical message, so to speak, is not one that can be conveyed (...)
  18. Psychological Nihilism, Passions, and Neglected Works: Three Topics for Nietzsche Studies.Mattia Riccardi - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):266.
    In the last two decades or so, Anglophone Nietzsche studies have discussed extensively Nietzsche’s views on metaethics, naturalism, free will, art, and morality, among other topics. More recently, substantial work has been produced on his philosophical psychology, which had long been a neglected area. What should come next?A topic that I think is in need of philosophical reappraisal is Nietzsche’s diagnosis of nihilism. “Nihilism” is one of those terms that, though it appears only a few times in his published works, (...)
  19. Must We Choose Between Real Nietzsche and Good Philosophy? A Streitschrift.Tom Stern - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):277.
    When I began writing about Nietzsche, working within an Anglophone philosophy department, I found little to read about the methods and goals of the practice I was engaging in. This was very surprising to colleagues in other disciplines, for whom “methods” classes were standard fare. Within my discipline, conversely, pretty much nobody asked questions about methodology. Increasingly, this has become, to my mind, one of the greatest challenges facing philosophical Nietzsche scholarship: to give an account of itself. My guess is (...)
  20. Nietzsche: Old and New Questions. Clark - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):228.
    Let me begin by stating that I do not believe that there are topics that have been overdone in Nietzsche scholarship or that we need new shiny questions. I consider it likely that contributions can still be made on just about any topic, including such well-trodden ones as the nature of Nietzsche’s naturalism, his metaethics, his account of morality, and his claims about the sovereign individual, the bad conscience, and even perspectivism and truth. On the latter, just over a year (...)
  21. Why We Read Nietzsche.Andrew Huddleston - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):233.
    Our brief here is to highlight some of the most pressing questions for Nietzsche studies. I do not, for my part, focus on particular philosophical issues, such as Nietzsche’s views on topics in ethics, moral psychology, philosophy of action, and the like. Important avenues of study indeed are open here, and some remain underexplored. The matters I would instead like to flag are metaphilosophical: issues about Nietzsche’s own, often very distinctive, approach to philosophy and philosophical writing, and issues about how (...)
  22. Moral Critique and Philosophical Psychology.Paul Katsafanas - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):245.
    Given the richness of Nietzsche’s texts and the variety of his concerns, picking just a few key topics is no easy task. I am going to focus on two issues that are both obvious and elusive: obvious, because they are some of Nietzsche’s central concerns, and elusive, because the literature hasn’t yet come to terms with these topics. Nietzsche’s approach to these topics is distinctive, his arguments complex and interwoven, so that his discussions can appear incongruously varied, even contradictory.First, how (...)
  23. Nietzsche's Futurism.Paul S. Loeb - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):253.
    I would like to answer this question about the future of Nietzsche studies with a question about Nietzsche’s studies of the future. From the start of his career, with BT, until the end, with EH, Nietzsche was obsessed with imagining, anticipating, and shaping the future. Why is that? What is it about Nietzsche’s distinctive philosophical orientation that caused him to be so preoccupied in this way?We Nietzsche scholars have spent considerable time and energy dwelling on his historicist convictions and practices, (...)
  24. Perspectivism and Falsification: A Reply to Maudemarie Clark.Alexander Nehamas - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):214.
    When and for how long did Nietzsche accept the “falsification thesis”—a view that “seems to amount to a denial that any human belief is, or could be, true”?1 I believe that the thesis is already absent from the first edition of GS.2 Maudemarie Clark argues that my interpretation of the relevant passages of GS as well as of the scope and nature of perspectivism is mistaken.3 I don’t agree.I begin with a few remarks on GS 110, where Nietzsche writes, “Over (...)
  25. The Psychology of Perspectivism: A Question for Nietzsche Studies Now.R. Lanier Anderson - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):221.
    There are many pressing questions for Nietzsche studies at present, but I will attempt neither a systematic catalog nor any argument that one or two have greater immediacy than all others. Instead, I will sketch one issue that I find especially pertinent: the relation between perspectivism and Nietzsche’s core commitments in moral psychology. Work on this relation can build on certain significant results from the recent literature, but I believe that substantial progress remains to be made. I say that not (...)
  26. The Wisdom of Silenus: Suffering in The Birth of Tragedy.Katie Brennan - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):174.
    In BT Nietzsche famously claims that “only as an aesthetic phenomenon do existence and the world appear justified”.1 For Nietzsche, art has the potential to make life appear meaningful and worth living—art can justify life.2 Nietzsche looks to ancient Greek tragedy as an art form that was, historically speaking, particularly successful at affirming life. It provided the ancients with “metaphysical solace [...] the solace that in the ground of things, and despite all changing appearances, life is mighty and pleasurable”. For (...)
  27. More Modesty, Less Charity.Christopher Janaway - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):240.
    Suppose someone asks, “Where does Nietzsche stand in the debate between today’s error theorists and non-cognitivists?” Wouldn’t that be rather like asking what Bismarck’s policy is on the European Union or whether Mahler thinks MP3 streaming is killing live music? We could certainly pose a more careful, speculative kind of question, and ask what these figures from the late nineteenth century “would have thought” about today’s issues, and that exercise might be illuminating. But caveats apply: first, we should enter such (...)
  28. The Truth Is Terrible.Brian Leiter - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):151.
    Nietzsche famously says, in his unusual autobiography EH and elsewhere in his corpus,1 that “the truth is terrible,” and I would like to begin by canvassing the various considerations in support of that conclusion, both ones that Nietzsche explicitly acknowledged, and also others, offered in a Nietzschean spirit, that support his verdict.First, for Nietzsche, as for Schopenhauer before him, there are the terrible existential truths about the human situation. The fact that all of us are destined for oblivion only scratches (...)
  29. Nietzsche Studies as Historical Philosophizing.John Richardson - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (2):271.
    As to which of Nietzsche’s own topics is most important for Nietzsche scholars to address, I think the answer is clear: his critique of morality. This is his own idea of where his main importance lies. He also stresses the extreme difficulty of the task. It’s hard not just because the issues are so very complex, but because anyone who tries to evaluate morality is inhibited and misled by his or her own ingrained allegiance to it. We cannot find sufficient (...)
  30. Nietzsche's Negative View of Freedom.David E. Rowe - 2014 - Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy 1 (21):125-143.
  31. Moral Relativism and Perspectival Values.Pietro Gori & Paolo Stellino - 2018 - In António Marques & João Sàágua (eds.), Essays on Values and Practical Rationality. Ethical and Aesthetical Dimensions. Bern/New York: pp. 155-174.
    The paper explores the issue of moral relativism in Nietzsche, and tries to argue that Nietzsche's attitude towards moral values does not support a radical relativism according to which since (i) every moral interpretation is relative to a judging perspective, and (ii) an absolute viewpoint is lacking, then (iii) every moral interpretation seems to be as true, valid or justified as the others. On the contrary, Nietzsche's perspectivism leaves space for a rank order among values, whose establishment is considered by (...)
  32. Nietzsche and Plato on Unity and Disunity of the Soul.Mattia Riccardi - manuscript
  33. Nietzsche’s Genealogy: A Textbook Parody.Andrew Inkpin - 2018 - Nietzsche Studien Gesamtregister Bände 1-20 47 (1):140-166.
    Given its apparently scholarly form, the Genealogy of Morals is often read as a succinct, relatively systematic, and canonical exposition of Nietzsche’s mature views on morality. This article argues, however, that the work was intended as a parody of a scholarly treatise and examines how this parody is best understood. It begins by surveying some evidence that supports reading the Genealogy as a ‘textbook’ presentation of Nietzsche’s views. It then develops an exegetic case for reading it as a work of (...)
  34. On Nietzsche’s Music and Words.David Blair Allison - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):135-160.
  35. Nietzsche, Dionysus, and the Virtual.Christoph Cox - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):161-170.
  36. Music and Words.Friedrich Nietzsche - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):125-134.
  37. Nietzsche’s Birth of Tragedy.David Blair Allison - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):47-60.
  38. Nietzsche’s Archilochus and the Lyric Subject.Babette Babich - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):85-122.
  39. Rhythm and Rhetoric in Nietzsche.Angèle Kremer-Marietti - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):73-84.
  40. Nietzsche and the Homeric Question.David Rapport Lachterman - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):27-45.
  41. On the Theory of Quantitifying Rhythm.Friedrich Nietzsche - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):63-71.
  42. Nietzsche and the Birth of Tragedy.Günter Wohlfart - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):13-26.
  43. Reading Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy.Babette Babich - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):1-2.
  44. The Birth of Tragic Thought.Friedrich Nietzsche - 2016 - New Nietzsche Studies 10 (1):1-12.
  45. Science and Two Kinds of Knowledge: Nietzsche, Schopenhauer, and the Ignorabimus-Streit.Timothy Stoll - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (3):519-549.
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Nietzsche’s conception of scientific explanation that promises to resolve the apparent tension between his insistence on the veracity of such explanations, and his frequent attempts to impugn their cognitive reach. Nietzsche follows earlier nineteenth-century critiques of science in claiming that science yields only factual or “descriptive” knowledge, not understanding. The paper concludes that the conception of descriptive knowledge is robust and compatible with Nietzsche’s commitment to the truth and rigor of scientific theories. The (...)
  46. Foucault and the Two Approaches to Biopolitics.Marco Piasentier - 2018 - In Hannah Richter (ed.), Biopolitical Governance Race, Gender and Economy. Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 21-39.
  47. The Nietzschean Self: Moral Psychology, Agency, and the Unconscious by Paul Katsafanas. [REVIEW]Richard Elliott - 2016 - Agonist - A Nietzsche Circle Journal 10:92 - 100.
  48. Figures Philosophiques du Conflit.Andreas Wilmes & Joan-Antoine Mallet (eds.) - 2015 - Paris, France: L'Harmattan.
    L'ambition de cet ouvrage est d'illustrer à la fois comment la philosophie conceptualise le conflit et comment elle s'efforce d'en résoudre les dangers inhérents. Plutôt que de proposer un aperçu purement abstrait de la notion de « conflit », l'ensemble des travaux se focalise sur la confrontation des philosophes à des problèmes historiques tels que la guerre, la dissension sociale, la tyrannie, ou encore le sport. -/- .
  49. David Storey, Naturalizing Heidegger: His Confrontation With Nietzsche, His Contributions to Environmental Philosophy. [REVIEW]Chad Engelland - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2015:09.11.
  50. ‘Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art’, Mark Anderson. [REVIEW]Bethany Parsons - 2015 - Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 27:166-170.
    Book review of Mark Anderson's 'Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art' for Pli, the Warwick Journal of Philosophy.
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