G. W. F. Hegel

Edited by Paul Redding (University of Sydney)
Assistant editor: Paolo Diego Bubbio (University of Western Sydney, Hawkesbury)
About this topic
Summary

Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831) is generally considered to be the most systematic philosopher within the movement of “German idealism” in the first decades of the Nineteenth Century. In his writings, and particularly in his popular lectures at the University of Berlin in the 1820s, Hegel attempted to elaborate a comprehensive and systematic philosophy from a “logical” starting point. He is perhaps most well-known for his social and political philosophy and for his teleological account of history, an account which was later taken over by Karl Marx and “inverted” into a materialist theory of an historical development culminating in communism. For most of the twentieth century, the “logical” and systematic side of Hegel's thought had been largely forgotten, but his political and social philosophy continued to attract interest and support. Since the 1970s, a degree of more general philosophical interest in Hegel’s systematic thought has also been revived, often treating Hegel’s philosophy in relation to the earlier “transcendental” idealism of Immanuel Kant.

Key works Hegel's first major publication was his Phenomenology of Spirit (Phänomenologie des Geistes) [Hegel 1977], published in 1807. Working through this work was meant to lift the reader from their naturally perspectival view of the world to the objective standpoint of philosophy or "science" (Wissenschaft). This work was followed by his Science of Logic (Wissenschaft der Logik) published in three volumes in 1812, 1813 and 1816 [Hegel 2010], and then, in 1817, his Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences, comprising a shortened "Logic" [Hegel 2010], a "Philosophy of Nature" [Hegel 1970] and a "Philosophy of Spirit" [Hegel 1970]. While occupying the chair of philosophy at the University of Berlin, Hegel gave multiple lecture series on the Philosophy of History [Hegel 2011], the History of Philosophy [Brown 2009, Brown 2006, Brown 2009], Aesthetics [Hegel 1998, Hegel 1998], and Philosophy of Religion [Hegel 2006].
Introductions Online encyclopedia articles: David A. Duquette, "Hegel's Social and Political Thought" [Duquette 2001]; Paul Redding, "G. W. F. Hegel" [Redding 2008]. Book-length introductory works: Frederick Beiser, Hegel [Beiser 2005]; Stephen Houlgate, An Introduction to Hegel: Freedom, Truth and History [Houlgate 2005]; Peter Singer, Hegel: A Very Short Introduction [Singer 2001]. Terry Pinkard, Hegel: A Biography [Pinkard 2000] provides a comprehensive introduction to all spheres of Hegel's philosophy presented in the context of his biography.
Related categories
Subcategories:
Hegel, Misc (320)

6703 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 6703
Material to categorize
  1. Hegel's Logic as Presuppositionless Science.Miles Hentrup - forthcoming - Idealistic Studies.
    In this article, I offer a critical interpretation of Hegel’s claims regarding the presuppositionless status of the Logic. Commentators have been divided as to whether the Logic actually achieves the status of presuppositionless science, disagreeing as to whether the Logic succeeds in making an unmediated beginning. I argue, however, that this understanding of presuppositionless science is misguided, as it reflects a spurious conception of immediacy that Hegel criticizes as false. Contextualizing Hegel’s remarks in light of his broader approach to the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. A Turning Point in Oxford Idealism.Philip T. Grier - 2019 - The Owl of Minerva 50 (1):1-45.
    As a young Victoria Scholar from South Africa studying at Oxford from 1931–33, Errol Harris encountered most of the prominent representatives of “Oxford Idealism” there. He discovered that, predominantly under the influence of Bradley, they were uniformly convinced that Hegel’s Naturphilosophie was a superfluous “addition” to his system, accomplishing nothing not already provided by the Science of Logic, and that, moreover, to treat Nature as a reality would introduce a fundamental contradiction into Hegel’s thought. In this general attitude they were (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Species Problem in Hegel's Philosophy of Nature.Martin Krahn - 2019 - The Owl of Minerva 50 (1):47-68.
    In this article, I argue that species are mutable in Hegel’s philosophy of biology. While scholars have argued for the compatibility of Hegel’s philosophy and Darwin’s theory of evolution, none have dealt with the ontological status of species in their respective accounts. In order to make the case that for Hegel species are mutable, I first deal with a textual problem that in the 1827 edition of the Encyclopedia, the species concept appears after the sexual relationship, whereas in the 1830 (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Thom Brooks and Sebastian Stein, Eds. Hegel’s Political Philosophy: On the Normative Significance of Method and System.Filip Niklas - 2019 - The Owl of Minerva 50 (1):106-116.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Hegel's Analysis of Egyptian Art and Architecture as a Form of Philosophical Anthropology.Jon Stewart - 2019 - The Owl of Minerva 50 (1):69-90.
    In his different analyses of ancient Egypt, Hegel underscores the marked absence of writings by the Egyptians. Unlike the Chinese with the I Ching or the Shoo king, the Indians with the Ramayana and the Mahabharata, the Persians with the Avesta, the Jews with the Old Testament, and the Greeks with the poems of Homer and Hesiod, the Egyptians, despite their developed system of hieroglyphic writing, left behind no great canonical text. Instead, he claims, they left their mark by means (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Molly Farneth. Hegel’s Social Ethics: Religion, Conflict, and Rituals of Reconciliation.Eric von der Luft - 2019 - The Owl of Minerva 50 (1):101-105.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Paolo Diego Bubbio. God and the Self in Hegel: Beyond Subjectivism.Philip T. Grier - 2019 - The Owl of Minerva 50 (1):91-100.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Species Problem in Hegel's Philosophy of Nature in Advance.Martin Krahn - forthcoming - The Owl of Minerva.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Jacques Derrida in Agamben's Philosophy.Virgil W. Brower - 2017 - In Adam Kotsko & Carl Salzani (eds.), Agamben's Philosophical Lineage. Edinburgh, UK: pp. 252-261.
  10. A Turning Point in Oxford Idealism in Advance.Philip T. Grier - forthcoming - The Owl of Minerva.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A Turning Point in Oxford Idealism.Philip T. Grier - forthcoming - The Owl of Minerva.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Idealism - New Dictionary of the History of Ideas Entry.Michael Baur - 2005 - In Maryanne Cline Horowitz (ed.), New Dictionary of the History of Ideas. Detroit, MI, USA: pp. 1078-1082.
  13. Hegel.Christopher Yeomans - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe (ed.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 356-363.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Tom Rockmore: Hegel, Idealism, and Analytic Philosophy. [REVIEW]Christopher Yeomans - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60:686-687.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Hegel Et L'hégélianisme. Par René Serreau. Coll. “Que Sais-Je?”, 1029. Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1962. 128 Pages. [REVIEW]Louis Valcke - 1965 - Dialogue 3 (4):451-451.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Hegel's Phenomenology: Dialogues on the Life of Mind. By J. Loewenberg, La Salle, Illinois, Open Court Publishing Co. 1965, Pp. Xv, 377. $12.50. [REVIEW]J. A. Doull - 1966 - Dialogue 5 (1):96-98.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Structures et mouvement dialectique dans la Phénoménologie de l'Esprit de Hegel. Par Pierre-Jean Labarrière. Aubier-Montaigne , Paris, 1968. 316 pages. [REVIEW]Yvon Gauthier - 1970 - Dialogue 8 (4):738-740.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Introduction to the Reading of Hegel: Lectures on the Phenomenology of Spirit. By Alexandre Kojève Edited by Allan Bloom. Translated From the French by James H. Nichols, Jr. New York and London: Basic Books, 1969. Pp. Xiv, 287. $8.50. [REVIEW]Michael Fox - 1972 - Dialogue 11 (3):444-447.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Hegel et le siècle des Lumières. Publié sous la direction de Jacques D'Hondt. Paris, Presses universitaires de France, 1974, 183 pages. [REVIEW]Théodore F. Geraets - 1975 - Dialogue 14 (4):706-707.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Hegel's Philosophy of History. By Burleigh Taylor Wilkins.Ithaca: Cornell University Press. 1974. Pp. 196. $7.50.Michael Fox - 1977 - Dialogue 16 (2):346-348.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Hegel's Philosophy of Subjective Spirit. By M. J. Petry. Dordrecht and Boston: D. Reidel, 1978. 3 Volumes, Clvii + 174, 677, 502 Pp. [REVIEW]H. S. Harris - 1979 - Dialogue 18 (4):600-606.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Hegel in His TimeJacques D'Hondt Translated by John Burbidge, with Nelson Roland and Judith Levasseur Peterborough, on, and Lewiston, NY: Broadview Press, 1988. Xiv + 224 P. [REVIEW]H. S. Harris - 1990 - Dialogue 29 (4):602-603.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Freedom and the End of Reason: On the Moral Foundations of Kant's Critical Philosophy, Richard L. Velkley, University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1989.Onora O'Neill - 1990 - Hegel Bulletin 11 (1-2):84-88.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Hegel's Analysis of Egyptian Art and Architecture as a Form of Philosophical Anthropology in Advance.Jon Stewart - forthcoming - The Owl of Minerva.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Role of Skepticism in the Emergence of German Idealism.Michael Baur - 1999 - In Michael Baur & Daniel Dahlstrom (eds.), The Emergence of German Idealism. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 63-91.
    According to Immanuel Kant’s well-known account of his own intellectual development, it was the skeptic David Hume who roused him from his dogmatic slumber. According to some popular accounts of post-Kantian philosophy, it was the soporific speculation of the idealists that quickly returned German philosophy to the Procrustean bed of unverifiable metaphysics, where it dogmatically slept for half of the nineteenth century. This popular picture of post-Kantian German philosophy receives some apparent support from the relevant evidence. After all, Kant had (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Dialectic and Gospel in the Development of Hegel's ThinkingStephen Crites University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998, Xvii + 572 Pp., $65.00. [REVIEW]Paul Redding - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):852-854.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Hegel Et l'Idéalisme allemandJean-Louis Vieillard-Baron Collection «Histoire de la Philosophie» Paris, Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 1999, 386 P. [REVIEW]Éric Guay - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):835-838.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Hegel, naissance d'une philosophie. Une biographie intellectuelleHorst Althaus Traduit de l'allemand par Isabelle Kalinowski Paris, Éditions du Seuil, 1999, 607 p. [REVIEW]Éric Guay - 2000 - Dialogue 39 (4):832-835.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Hegel And Schelling on the Path of Aristotelian Ascent.Chandler D. Rogers - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
  30. The Blackwell Companion to Hegel.Michael Baur & Stephen Houlgate (eds.) - 2011 - Blackwell.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. From Kant’s Highest Good to Hegel’s Absolute Knowing.Michael Baur - 2011 - In Michael Baur & Stephen Houlgate (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Hegel. Malden, MA, USA: pp. 452-473.
    Hegel’s most abiding aspiration was to be a volkserzieher (an educator of the people) in the tradition of thinkers of Moses Mendelssohn (1729-1786), Gotthold Ephraim Lessing (1729-1781), and Friedrich Schiller (159-1786). No doubt, he was also deeply interested in epistemology and metaphysics, but this interest stemmed at least in part from his belief (which Kant also shared) that human beings could become truly liberated to fulfill their vocations as human beings, only if they were also liberated from the illusions and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Hegel and the Classical Pragmatists: Prolegomenon to a Future Discussion.Michael Baur - 2014 - In Judith Green (ed.), Richard J. Bernstein and the Pragmatic Turn in Contemporary Philosophy: Rekindling Pragmatism's Fire. New York, NY, USA: pp. 39-52.
    As Richard Bernstein has suggested, there is a very rich and interesting story to be told about how the classical pragmatists (Dewey, Peirce, and James) understood G. W. R Hegel, made use of Hegel, and ultimately distanced themselves from Hegel. That story cannot be told here. Indeed, the story is so rich and complicated that even its beginnings cannot be told here. But what can be provided, perhaps, is a limited, though hopefully illuminating, perspective on a few salient aspects of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Introduction to G.W.F. Hegel Key Concepts.Michael Baur - 2014 - In G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts. New York: pp. 1-13.
    The thought of G. W. F. Hegel (1770 -1831) has had a deep and lasting influence on a wide range of philosophical, political, religious, aesthetic, cultural and scientific movements. But, despite the far-reaching importance of Hegel's thought, there is often a great deal of confusion about what he actually said or believed. G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts provides an accessible introduction to both Hegel's thought and Hegel-inspired philosophy in general, demonstrating how his concepts were understood, adopted and critically transformed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Hegel and Hermeneutics.Michael Baur - 2014 - In G.W.F. Hegel: Key Concepts. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 208-221.
    Understood in its widest sense, the term “hermeneutics” can be taken to refer to the theory and/or practice of any interpretation aimed at uncovering the meaning of any expression, regardless of whether such expression was produced by a human or non-human source. Understood in a narrower sense, the term “hermeneutics” can be taken to refer to a particular stream of thought regarding the theory and/or practice of interpretation, developed mainly by German-speaking theorists from the late eighteenth through to the late (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. The Religious Dimension in Hegel's Thought. By Emil L. Fackenheim. Bloomington, Indiana University Press, 1967, Pp. Xiii, 274. $8.50. [REVIEW]J. A. Doull - 1968 - Dialogue 7 (3):483-491.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Hegel, Philosophe de l'Histoire vivante. Par Jacques D'Hondt. P.U.F., Paris, 1966. Pp. 486.Louis Valcke - 1968 - Dialogue 7 (3):480-483.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. L'Arc et le cercle. l'Essence du langage chez Hegel et Hölderlin. Par Yvon Gauthier. Coll. Essais pour notre temps. Paris, Desclée de Brouwer, 1969. [REVIEW]J. Taminiaux - 1971 - Dialogue 10 (1):146-149.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Hegel’s Philosophy of Religion.Walter Jaeschke & Peter C. Hodgson - 1980 - The Owl of Minerva 11 (4):1-6.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Aakash Singh Rathore and Rimina Mohapatra. Hegel’s India: A Reinterpretation, with Texts. [REVIEW]Eric von der Luft - 2016 - The Owl of Minerva 48 (1-2):170-174.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Ethical Theory of Hegel: A Study of the Philosophy of Right. By Hugh A. Reyburn. Oxford: The Clarendon Press, 1921; Reprinted 1967. Pp. Xx, 271. $3.85. [REVIEW]Michael Fox - 1968 - Dialogue 7 (1):144-145.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. G. W. F. Hegel: Gesammelte Werke. Band 12. [REVIEW]John Burbidge - 1981 - The Owl of Minerva 13 (2):7-7.
    The second volume of Hegel’s Science of Logic, containing “The Doctrine of the Concept”, first appeared in 1816, three years after the second book of the first volume, and just prior to the Heidelberg Encyclopaedia. After Hegel’s death it was republished in the first collected edition with minor changes in punctuation. There remain no manuscripts.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Hegel and the Human Spirit: A Translation of the Jena Lectures on the Philosophy of Spirit with CommentaryBetween Kant and Hegel: Texts in the Development of Post-Kantian Idealism. [REVIEW]Clark Butler - 1987 - The Owl of Minerva 19 (1):105-112.
    Earlier in the century, Richard Kroner in Von Kant bis Hegel gave us an orderly reconstruction of the development from Kant to Hegel. He thematized German idealism sympathetically from the inside, aiming to present it in and for itself. But a writer such as Kroner prefers a logical march of concepts, thus paying comparatively less attention to the often strange empirical details of intellectual history. The danger is that with such a writer the school’s self-consciousness, its being-for-itself, might be a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. G.W.F. Hegel: Rechtsphilosophie. [REVIEW]T. M. Knox - 1975 - The Owl of Minerva 7 (1):4-4.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. G. W. F. Hegel: Gesammelte Werke. Band 8: Jenaer Systementwürfe III. [REVIEW]H. S. Harris - 1977 - The Owl of Minerva 9 (1):5-7.
    I began my review of volume 6 of the new critical edition by saying that from the three volumes published we could see how the editors planned to deal with almost all the problems that they faced. I shall not be tempted into any rash statement of this kind again; for it is clear that every volume brings its own special problems with it. The present volume contains the manuscript that Hegel wrote for a course on “Realphilosophie” which he probably (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. “Logic Camp” - A Summer Seminar on Hegel’s Greater Logic.Kevin M. Clark - 1988 - The Owl of Minerva 20 (1):123-123.
    Eight scholars answered the call printed in both issues of volume 19 of The Owl to “bone up for Loyola” by attending a week-long seminar devoted to the study of Hegel’s Science of Logic. The seminar was held at Windy Pine, a summer retreat of the Trent University Canadian Studies Program, on Kushog Lake in Ontario’s Haliburton Highlands. A half dozen rustic cabins lining a rocky, wooded cove provided a delightful setting for the exercise of both mind and body. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. G. W. F. Hegel: The Difference Between Fiche’s and Schelling’s System of PhilosophyFaith and Knowledge. [REVIEW]Errol E. Harris - 1979 - The Owl of Minerva 11 (2):8-9.
    With the resurgence in recent years of Hegelian studies a veritable spate of new translations have appeared of that philosopher’s works. For a long time we have had Wallace’s inimitable version of the lesser Logic and the main text of the Philosophy of Mind. We have had also Johnson and Struther’s translation of the greater Logic, Baillie’s Phenomenology, the History of Philosophy done by E. S. Haldane and The Philosophy of History by Sibree, not to mention various fragmentary editions of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  47. In Memory of H.B. Acton.T. M. Knox - 1974 - The Owl of Minerva 5 (4):2-2.
    H.B. Acton, professor successively in South Wales, London, and Edinburgh, died in June 1974 when he was just sixty-six. His loss is deeply lamented by his friends, not least by students of Hegel; and they extend their profound sympathy to his widow. He was much interested in political, economic and social questions, and his publications on these matters are expressive of a humane and liberal outlook. His remarkable short book on Kant’s moral philosophy shed fresh light on a well-worn topic, (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. G. W. F. Hegel. Natural Law. [REVIEW]Duncan Forbes - 1976 - The Owl of Minerva 8 (2):7-2.
    Professor Knox’s translation is, as one would expect, excellent. Even so, understanding this text will present difficulties to anyone who is anything less than expert not only in the philosophy of Hegel, but in those of Kant, Fichte and, especially, Schelling, because Hegel’s philosophy in 1802–3 was still by no means fully-fledged. The result is that the usual difficulties of Hegelian terminology are compounded by the infusion of the terminology and philosophical programme of Schelling; one’s tendency to interpret the text (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. G. W. F. Hegel: An Introduction to the Science of Wisdom. [REVIEW]Michael Fox - 1975 - The Owl of Minerva 7 (1):7-3.
    Professor Rosen’s meaty and detailed study of Hegel’s attempt to create a “scientific” metaphysics, though far from being truly introductory, is a tour de force. Gathering together central theses from the Science of Logic, Encyclopedia, and Phenomenology, he not only provides the reader with fresh and penetrating expositions, but also highlights the theme-and-variation structure of Hegel’s incredibly broad-ranging and restless dialectical peregrinations. In so doing, Rosen displays a degree of erudition and mastery of both Hegel and his commentators that is (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion. Volume 2. Determinate Religion. [REVIEW]Errol E. Harris - 1990 - The Owl of Minerva 22 (1):113-116.
    It is hardly surprising that the translation of Part Two of Hegel’s Vorlesungen über die Philosophie der Religion should be the last of the three volumes to appear. Part Two, on determinate religion, is the longest, the most complicated, and, in its various versions, the most diverse of the three parts of Hegel’s Religionsphilosophie, and it must have required much more effort and attention to detail on the part of the editor and translators than either of the other two parts.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 6703