General Philosophy of Science

Edited by Howard Sankey (University of Melbourne)
Assistant editor: Filippos Anastasios Papagiannopoulos (University of Western Ontario)
89 found
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1 — 50 / 89
  1. added 2017-05-27
    Aesthetic Values in Science.Milena Ivanova - forthcoming - Philosophy Compass.
  2. added 2017-05-26
    The Directionality of Distinctively Mathematical Explanations.Carl F. Craver & Mark Povich - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    In “What Makes a Scientific Explanation Distinctively Mathematical?” (2013b), Lange uses several compelling examples to argue that certain explanations for natural phenomena appeal primarily to mathematical, rather than natural, facts. In such explanations, the core explanatory facts are modally stronger than facts about causation, regularity, and other natural relations. We show that Lange's account of distinctively mathematical explanation is flawed in that it fails to account for the implicit directionality in each of his examples. This inadequacy is remediable in each (...)
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  3. added 2017-05-26
    Mechanistic Levels, Reduction, and Emergence.Mark Povich & Carl F. Craver - forthcoming - In Stuart Glennan & Phyllis McKay Illari (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Mechanisms and Mechanical Philosophy. Routledge.
    We sketch the mechanistic approach to levels, contrast it with other senses of “level,” and explore some of its metaphysical implications. This perspective allows us to articulate what it means for things to be at different levels, to distinguish mechanistic levels from realization relations, and to describe the structure of multilevel explanations, the evidence by which they are evaluated, and the scientific unity that results from them. This approach is not intended to solve all metaphysical problems surrounding physicalism. Yet it (...)
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  4. added 2017-05-26
    The Parliament of Things and the Anthropocene: How to Listen to ‘Quasi-Objects’.Massimiliano Simons - 2017 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 21 (2-3):1-25.
    Among the contemporary philosophers using the concept of the Anthropocene, Bruno Latour and Isabelle Stengers are prominent examples. The way they use this concept, however, diverts from the most common understanding of the Anthropocene. In fact, their use of this notion is a continuation of their earlier work around the concept of a ‘parliament of things.’ Although mainly seen as a sociology or philosophy of science, their work can be read as philosophy of technology as well. Similar to Latour’s claim (...)
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  5. added 2017-05-26
    Review of Carl Gillett's Reduction and Emergence in Science and Philosophy. [REVIEW]Elanor Taylor - 2017 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:N/A.
    Review of Carl Gillett's "Reduction and Emergence in Science and Philosophy.".
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  6. added 2017-05-26
    Making Sense of Interlevel Causation in Mechanisms From a Metaphysical Perspective.Beate Krickel - unknown
    According to the new mechanistic approach, an acting entity is at a lower mechanistic level than another acting entity if and only if the former is a component in the mechanism for the latter. Craver and Bechtel (2007) argue that a consequence of this view is that there cannot be causal interactions between acting entities at different mechanistic levels. Their main reason seems to be what I will call the Metaphysical Argument: things at different levels of a mechanism are related (...)
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  7. added 2017-05-26
    Saving the Mutual Manipulability Account of Constitutive Relevance.Beate Krickel - unknown
    Constitutive mechanistic explanations are said to refer to mechanisms that constitute the phenomenon-to-be-explained. The most prominent approach of how to understand this constitution relation is Carl Craver’s mutual manipulability approach to constitutive relevance. Recently, the mutual manipulability approach has come under attack (Leuridan 2012; Baumgartner and Gebharter 2015; Romero 2015; Harinen 2014; Casini and Baumgartner 2016). Roughly, it is argued that this approach is inconsistent because it is spelled out in terms of interventionism (which is an approach to causation), whereas (...)
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  8. added 2017-05-25
    Novelty Vs. Replicability: Virtues and Vices in the Reward System of Science.Felipe Romero - forthcoming - Philosophy of Science.
    The reward system of science is the priority rule (Merton, 1957). The first scientist making a new discovery is rewarded with prestige while second runners get little or nothing. Strevens (2003, 2011), following Kitcher (1990), defends this reward system arguing that it incentivizes an efficient division of cognitive labor. I argue that this assessment depends on strong implicit assumptions about the replicability of findings. I question these assumptions based on meta-scientific evidence and argue that the priority rule systematically discourages replication. (...)
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  9. added 2017-05-24
    Review of The Multiple Realization Book by Thomas W. Polger & Lawrence A. Shapiro (Oxford: Oxford University Press). [REVIEW]Tuomas K. Pernu - 2017 - Metapsychology Online Reviews 21.
  10. added 2017-05-22
    The Right to Ignore: An Epistemic Defense of the Nature/Culture Divide.Maria Kronfeldner - forthcoming - In Richard Joyce (ed.), Handbook of Evolution and Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 210-224.
    This paper addresses whether the often-bemoaned loss of unity of knowledge about humans, which results from the disciplinary fragmentation of science, is something to be overcome. The fragmentation of being human rests on a couple of distinctions, such as the nature-culture divide. Since antiquity the distinction between nature (roughly, what we inherit biologically) and culture (roughly, what is acquired by social interaction) has been a commonplace in science and society. Recently, the nature/culture divide has come under attack in various ways, (...)
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  11. added 2017-05-22
    Divide and Conquer: The Authority of Nature and Why We Disagree About Human Nature.Maria Kronfeldner - forthcoming - In Why we disagree about human nature. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The term ‘human nature’ can refer to different things in the world and fulfil different epistemic roles. Human nature can refer to a classificatory nature (classificatory criteria that determine the boundaries of, and membership in, a biological or social group called ‘human’), a descriptive nature (a bundle of properties describing the respective group’s life form), or an explanatory nature (a set of factors explaining that life form). This chapter will first introduce these three kinds of ‘human nature’, together with seven (...)
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  12. added 2017-05-21
    Arithmetic, Set Theory, Reduction and Explanation.William D'Alessandro - forthcoming - Synthese:1-31.
    Philosophers of science since Nagel have been interested in the links between intertheoretic reduction and explanation, understanding and other forms of epistemic progress. Although intertheoretic reduction is widely agreed to occur in pure mathematics as well as empirical science, the relationship between reduction and explanation in the mathematical setting has rarely been investigated in a similarly serious way. This paper examines an important particular case: the reduction of arithmetic to set theory. I claim that the reduction is unexplanatory. In defense (...)
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  13. added 2017-05-19
    Renormalizability, Fundamentality and a Final Theory: The Role of UV-Completion in the Search for Quantum Gravity.Karen Crowther & Niels Linnemann - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    Principles are central to physical reasoning, particularly in the search for a theory of quantum gravity (QG), where novel empirical data is lacking. One principle widely adopted in the search for QG is UV completion: the idea that a theory should (formally) hold up to all possible high energies. We argue---/contra/ standard scientific practice---that UV-completion is poorly-motivated as a guiding principle in theory-construction, and cannot be used as a criterion of theory-justification in the search for QG. For this, we explore (...)
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  14. added 2017-05-18
    Review Essay, Models and Exploratory Models. [REVIEW]Fiora Salis - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science.
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  15. added 2017-05-17
    The Heuristic Conception of Inference to the Best Explanation.Finnur Dellsén - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-22.
    An influential suggestion about the relationship between Bayesianism and Inference to the Best Explanation (IBE) holds that IBE functions as a heuristic to approximate Bayesian reasoning. While this view promises to unify Bayesianism and IBE in a very attractive manner, important elements of the view have not yet been spelled out in detail. I present and argue for a heuristic conception of IBE on which IBE serves primarily to locate the most probable available explanatory hypothesis to serve as a working (...)
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  16. added 2017-05-17
    Critical Citizens or Paranoid Nutcases: On the Epistemology of Conspiracy Theories.Daniel Cohnitz - 2017 - Utrecht: Universiteit Utrecht, Faculteit Geesteswetenschappen.
  17. added 2017-05-12
    Pluralism in Historiography. A Case Study of Case Studies.Katherina Kinzel - 2016 - In Tilman Sauer & Scholl Raphael (eds.), The Philosophy of Historical Case Studies. Springer. pp. 123-150.
    In history the same historical episodes can be reconstructed from multiple perspectives, leading to different interpretations and evaluations of the same events, and sometimes even to different factual claims. In this paper, I analyze what I call “historiographic pluralism” – situation of conflict between different case studies of the same episodes. I address two interrelated questions: First, which features of historical reconstruction and representation give rise to such conflicts? Second, can we assess rival historical case studies and decide between them, (...)
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  18. added 2017-05-12
    'Explicating Ways of Consensus-Making: Distinguishing the Academic, the Interface and the Meta-Consensus.Laszlo Kosolosky & Jeroen Van Bouwel - 2014 - In Carlo Martini (ed.), Experts and Consensus in Social Science. Berlin: Springer. pp. 71-92.
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  19. added 2017-05-11
    Situating Kant’s Pre-Critical Monadology: Leibnizian Ubeity, Monadic Activity, and Idealist Unity.Edward Slowik - 2016 - Early Science and Medicine 21:332-349.
    This essay examines the relationship between monads and space in Kant’s early pre-critical work, with special attention devoted to the question of ubeity, a Scholastic doctrine that Leibniz describes as “ways of being somewhere”. By focusing attention on this concept, evidence will be put forward that supports the claim, held by various scholars, that the monad-space relationship in Kant is closer to Leibniz’ original conception than the hypotheses typically offered by the later Leibniz-Wolff school. In addition, Kant’s monadology, in conjunction (...)
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  20. added 2017-05-10
    Kantian Essentialism in the Metaphysical Foundations.Lydia Patton - forthcoming - The Monist 100 (3).
    Ott (2009) identifies two kinds of philosophical theories about laws: top-down, and bottom-up. An influential top-down reading, exemplified by Ernst Cassirer, emphasized the ‘mere form of law’. Recent bottom-up accounts emphasize the mind-independent natures of objects as the basis of laws of nature. Stang and Pollok in turn focus on the transcendental idealist elements of Kant’s theory of matter, which leads to the question: is the essence of Kantian matter that it obeys the form of law? I argue that Kant (...)
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  21. added 2017-05-10
    A New Approach in Classical Electrodynamics to Protect Principle of Causality.Biswaranjan Dikshit - 2014 - Journal of Theoretical Physics and Cryptography 5:1-4.
    In classical electrodynamics, electromagnetic effects are calculated from solution of wave equation formed by combination of four Maxwell’s equations. However, along with retarded solution, this wave equation admits advanced solution in which case the effect happens before the cause. So, to preserve causality in natural events, the retarded solution is intentionally chosen and the advance part is just ignored. But, an equation or method cannot be called fundamental if it admits a wrong result (that violates principle of causality) in addition (...)
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  22. added 2017-05-09
    Three Barriers to Philosophical Progress.Jessica Wilson - 2017 - In Russell Blackford & Damien Broderick (eds.), Philosophy's Future: The Problem of Philosophical Progress. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley Blackwell. pp. 91--104.
    I argue that the present (if not insuperable) lack of fixed standards in philosophy is associated with three barriers to philosophical progress, pertaining to intra-disciplinary siloing, sociological rather than philosophical determinants of philosophical attention, and the encouraging of bias.
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  23. added 2017-05-09
    Ontic Structural Realism.Kerry McKenzie - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (4).
    Ontic structural realism is at its core the view that “structure is ontologically fundamental.” Informed from its inception by the scientific revolutions that punctuated the 20th century, its advocates often present the position as the perspective on ontology best befitting of modern physics. But the idea that structure is fundamental has proved difficult to articulate adequately, and what OSR's claimed naturalistic credentials consist in is hard to precisify as well. Nor is it clear that the position is actually supported by (...)
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  24. added 2017-05-08
    Measurement in Science.Eran Tal - 2015 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  25. added 2017-05-07
    Popper e o problema da predição prática.Eros Moreira De Carvalho - 2011 - Analytica 15 (02):123-146.
    The problem of rational prediction, launched by Wesley Salmon, is without doubt the Achilles heel of the critical method defended by Popper. In this paper, I assess the response given both by Popper and by the popperian Alan Musgrave to this problem. Both responses are inadequate and thus the conclusion of Salmon is reinforced: without appeal to induction, there is no way to make of the practical prediction a rational action. Furthermore, the critical method needs to be vindicated if one (...)
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  26. added 2017-05-07
    Popper e o problema da predição prática.Eros Moreira De Carvalho - 2011 - Analytica 15 (02):123-146.
    The problem of rational prediction, launched by Wesley Salmon, is without doubt the Achilles heel of the critical method defended by Popper. In this paper, I assess the response given both by Popper and by the popperian Alan Musgrave to this problem. Both responses are inadequate and thus the conclusion of Salmon is reinforced: without appeal to induction, there is no way to make of the practical prediction a rational action. Furthermore, the critical method needs to be vindicated if one (...)
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  27. added 2017-05-07
    Popper e o problema da predição prática.Eros Moreira De Carvalho - 2011 - Analytica 15 (02):123-146.
    The problem of rational prediction, launched by Wesley Salmon, is without doubt the Achilles heel of the critical method defended by Popper. In this paper, I assess the response given both by Popper and by the popperian Alan Musgrave to this problem. Both responses are inadequate and thus the conclusion of Salmon is reinforced: without appeal to induction, there is no way to make of the practical prediction a rational action. Furthermore, the critical method needs to be vindicated if one (...)
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  28. added 2017-05-05
    Who is Afraid of Scientific Imperialism?Roberto Fumagalli - forthcoming - Synthese:1-22.
    In recent years, several authors have debated about the justifiability of so-called scientific imperialism. To date, however, widespread disagreements remain regarding both the identification and the normative evaluation of scientific imperialism. In this paper, I aim to remedy this situation by making some conceptual distinctions concerning scientific imperialism and by providing a detailed assessment of the most prominent objections to it. I shall argue that these objections provide a valuable basis for opposing some instances of scientific imperialism, but do not (...)
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  29. added 2017-05-05
    Newman’s Objection is Dead; Long Live Newman’s Objection!Sebastian Lutz - manuscript
    There are two ways of reading Newman’s objection to Russell’s structuralism. One assumes that according to Russell, our knowledge of a theory about the external world is captured by an existential generalization on all non-logical symbols of the theory. Under this reading, our knowledge amounts to a cardinality claim. Another reading assumes that our knowledge singles out a structure in Russell’s (and Newman’s) sense: a model theoretic structure that is determined up to isomorphism. Under this reading, our knowledge is far (...)
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  30. added 2017-05-04
    Atheistic Induction by Boltzmann Brains.Bradley Monton - forthcoming - In Two Dozen (or so) Arguments for God: The Plantinga Project.
    I argue that naturalistic physics provides evidence for the failure of induction and that generates a new, thermodynamic, argument for the existence of God. I also have an epistemological epilogue on self-undermining arguments.
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  31. added 2017-05-01
    Inverse Functionalism and the Individuation of Powers.David Yates - forthcoming - Synthese:1-26.
    In the pure powers ontology (PPO), basic physical properties have wholly dispositional essences. PPO has clear advantages over categoricalist ontologies, which suffer from familiar epistemological and metaphysical problems. However, opponents argue that because it contains no qualitative properties, PPO lacks the resources to individuate powers, and generates a regress. The challenge for those who take such arguments seriously is to introduce qualitative properties without reintroducing the problems that PPO was meant to solve. In this paper, I distinguish the core claim (...)
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  32. added 2017-04-28
    Global Philosophy: What Philosophy Ought to Be.Nicholas Maxwell - 2014 - Exeter, UK: Imprint Academic.
    This book is about education, learning, rational inquiry, philosophy, science studies, problem solving, academic inquiry, global problems, wisdom and, above all, the urgent need for an academic revolution.
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  33. added 2017-04-27
    A caminho de uma filosofia sem alma. Uma abordagem psicofísica sobre a crítica da subjectividade de Nietzsche.Pietro Gori - forthcoming - Cadernos Nietzsche 2017.
    Friedrich Nietzsche’s criticism towards the substance-concept “I” plays an important role in his thought, and can be properly understood by making reference to the 19th century debate on the scientific psychology. Friedrich Lange and Ernst Mach gave an important contribution to that debate. Both of them thought about a “psychology without soul”, that is, an investigation that gives up with the old metaphysics of substance in dealing with the mind-body problem. In this paper I shall deal with Lange’s and Mach’s (...)
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  34. added 2017-04-25
    On the Justification of Deduction and Induction.Franz Huber - forthcoming - European Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    The thesis of this paper is that we can justify induction deductively relative to one end, and deduction inductively relative to a different end. I will begin by presenting a contemporary variant of Hume (1739; 1748)'s argument for the thesis that we cannot justify the principle of induction. Then I will criticize the responses the resulting problem of induction has received by Carnap (1963; 1968) and Goodman (1954), as well as praise Reichenbach (1938; 1940)'s approach. -/- Some of these authors (...)
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  35. added 2017-04-24
    Scientific Realism and Antirealism.Liston Michael - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Scientific Realism and Antirealism Debates about scientific realism concern the extent to which we are entitled to hope or believe that science will tell us what the world is really like. Realists tend to be optimistic; antirealists do not. To a first approximation, scientific realism is the view that well-confirmed scientific theories are approximately true; … Continue reading Scientific Realism and Antirealism →.
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  36. added 2017-04-21
    Make-Believe and Model-Based Representation in Science: The Epistemology of Frigg’s and Toon’s Fictionalist Views of Modeling.Poznic Michael - 2016 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):201-218.
    Roman Frigg and Adam Toon, both, defend a fictionalist view of scientific modeling. One fundamental thesis of their view is that scientists are participating in games of make-believe when they study models in order to learn about the models themselves and about target systems represented by the models. In this paper, the epistemology of these two fictionalist views is critically discussed. I will argue that both views can give an explanation of how scientists learn about models they are studying. However, (...)
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  37. added 2017-04-19
    Justifying the Special Theory of Relativity with Unconceived Methods.Seungbae Park - forthcoming - Axiomathes:1-10.
    Many realists argue that present scientific theories will not follow the fate of past scientific theories because the former are more successful than the latter. Critics object that realists need to show that present theories have reached the level of success that warrants their truth. I reply that the special theory of relativity has been repeatedly reinforced by unconceived scientific methods, so it will be reinforced by infinitely many unconceived scientific methods. This argument for the special theory of relativity overcomes (...)
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  38. added 2017-04-19
    Does Scientific Progress Consist in Increasing Knowledge or Understanding?Seungbae Park - forthcoming - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-11.
    Bird (2007) argues that scientific progress consists in increasing knowledge. Dellsén (2016a) objects that increasing knowledge is neither necessary nor sufficient for scientific progress, and argues that scientific progress rather consists in increasing understanding. Dellsén also contends that unlike Bird’s view, his view can account for the scientific practices of using idealizations and of choosing simple theories over complex ones. I argue that Dellsén’s criticisms against Bird’s view fail, and that increasing understanding cannot account for scientific progress, if acceptance, as (...)
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  39. added 2017-04-19
    David Marshall Miller.Representing Space in the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Pp. Xiii+235. $90.00. [REVIEW]Patrick J. Boner - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (1):172-173.
  40. added 2017-04-18
    Grounding-Mechanical Explanation.Kelly Trogdon - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies:1-21.
    I argue that there is an important similarity between causation and grounding. In particular I argue that, just as there is a type of scientific explanation that appeals to causal mechanisms—causal-mechanical explanation—there is a type of metaphysical explanation that appeals to grounding mechanisms—grounding-mechanical explanation. The upshot is that the role that grounding mechanisms play in certain metaphysical explanations mirrors the role that causal mechanisms play in certain scientific explanations. In this light, it becomes clear that grounding-mechanical explanations make crucial contributions (...)
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  41. added 2017-04-12
    On Treating Past and Present Scientific Theories Differently.Seungbae Park - forthcoming - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    Scientific realists argue that present theories are more successful than past theories, so present theories will not be superseded by alternatives, even though past theories were superseded by alternatives. Alai (2016) objects that although present theories are more successful than past theories, they will be replaced by future theories, just as past theories were replaced by present theories. He contends, however, that past theories were partly true, and that present theories are largely true. I argue that Alai’s discrimination between past (...)
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  42. added 2017-04-11
    Philosophy of History and History of Philosophy of Science.Thomas Uebel - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    hilosophy of history and history of philosophy of science make for an interesting case of “mutual containment”: the former is an object of inquiry for the latter, and the latter is subject to the demands of the former. This article discusses a seminal turn in past philosophy of history with an eye to the practice of historians of philosophy of science. The narrative turn by Danto and Mink represents both a liberation for historians and a new challenge to the objectivity (...)
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  43. added 2017-04-10
    Must Understanding Be Coherent?Kareem Khalifa - 2016 - In Stephen Grimm, Christoph Baumberger & Sabine Ammon (eds.), Explaining understanding: new perspectives from epistemology and philosophy of science. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 139-164.
    Several authors suggest that understanding and epistemic coherence are tightly connected. Using an account of understanding that makes no appeal to coherence, I explain away the intuitions that motivate this position. I then show that the leading coherentist epistemologies only place plausible constraints on understanding insofar as they replicate my own account’s requirements. I conclude that understanding is only superficially coherent.
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  44. added 2017-04-08
    Can Modal Skepticism Defeat Humean Skepticism?Peter Hawke - 2017 - In Bob Fischer Felipe Leon (ed.), Modal Epistemology After Rationalism. Dordrecht: Synthese Library. pp. 281-308.
    My topic is moderate modal skepticism in the spirit of Peter van Inwagen. Here understood, this is a conservative version of modal empiricism that severely limits the extent to which an ordinary agent can reasonably believe “exotic” possibility claims. I offer a novel argument in support of this brand of skepticism: modal skepticism grounds an attractive (and novel) reply to Humean skepticism. Thus, I propose that modal skepticism be accepted on the basis of its theoretical utility as a tool for (...)
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  45. added 2017-04-08
    Philosophy of Symmetry.Sarukkai Sundar - 2004 - Shimla: Indian Institute of Advanced Study.
    The idea of symmetry is one of the most important and pervasive ideas, occurring in disciplines ranging from the sciences to the arts. Symmetry is manifested very widely in the natural world as seen in the intricate shapes, patterns and colours of both inanimate and animate beings. It is a guiding principle in modern physics and is an integral part of many important works in architecture, sculpture, music, painting and so on. -/- This booksdiscuss some of the essential themes that (...)
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  46. added 2017-04-07
    Abductive Two-Dimensionalism: A New Route to the A Priori Identification of Necessary Truths.Biggs Stephen & Wilson Jessica - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Epistemic two-dimensional semantics (E2D), advocated by Chalmers (2006) and Jackson (1998), among others, aims to restore the link between necessity and a priority seemingly broken by Kripke (1972/1980), by showing how armchair access to semantic intensions provides a basis for knowledge of necessary a posteriori truths (among other modal claims). The most compelling objections to E2D are that, for one or other reason, the requisite intensions are not accessible from the armchair (see, e.g., Wilson 1982, Melnyk 2008). As we substantiate (...)
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  47. added 2017-04-07
    Quasi-Factive Belief and Knowledge-Like States.Michel J. Shaffer - forthcoming - Lexington Books.
    This book is addresses a topic that has received little or no attention in orthodox epistemology. Typical epistemological investigation focuses almost exclusively on knowledge, where knowing that something is the case importantly implies that what is believed is strictly true. This condition on knowledge is known as factivity and it is, to be sure, a bit of epistemological orthodoxy. So, if a belief is to qualify as knowledge according to the orthodox view it cannot be false. There is also an (...)
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  48. added 2017-04-07
    Unification Strategies in Cognitive Science.Marcin Miłkowski - 2017 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 48 (1):13–33.
    Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary conglomerate of various research fields and disciplines, which increases the risk of fragmentation of cognitive theories. However, while most previous work has focused on theoretical integration, some kinds of integration may turn out to be monstrous, or result in superficially lumped and unrelated bodies of knowledge. In this paper, I distinguish theoretical integration from theoretical unification, and propose some analyses of theoretical unification dimensions. Moreover, two research strategies that are supposed to lead to unification are (...)
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  49. added 2017-04-06
    Miguel Á. Granada, Patrick J. Boner, and Dario Tessicini, Eds. Unifying Heaven and Earth: Essays in the History of Early Modern Cosmology. Barcelona: Publicacions I Edicions de la Universitat de Barcelona, 2016. Pp. 356. €30.00. [REVIEW]Aviva Rothman - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
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  50. added 2017-04-06
    David Bronstein. Aristotle on Knowledge and Learning: The Posterior Analytics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. Xiii+272. $74.00. [REVIEW]Owen Goldin - forthcoming - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
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